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Friday, July 7
 

09:00

Day 1 PhD/Graduate Programme
Overview of the programme
Introduction to System Thinking in Practice (STiP) theoretical lineages and traditions; implications for research practices (the PFMS heuristic) 

Chairs
avatar for Chris Blackmore

Chris Blackmore

Senior Lecturer in Environmental & Development Systems, The Open University, UK
Particularly interested in social learning systems and communities of practice. Currently teaching and doing research. At the OU I chair Masters level courses on systems thinking in practice and environmental decision making. Also working on CADWAGO project...climate adaptation and... Read More →
avatar for Assoc.Prof. Dr. Ika Darnhofer

Assoc.Prof. Dr. Ika Darnhofer

Institute of Agricultural and Forestry Economics, BOKU (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences)
PhD (Graduate) Course Leader: Systems Thinking in Research Practice, 7 – 14 July | | My research focus is on management and decision making on family farms.Although I appreciate the value of the various tools of neoclassical economics for informing farm management on the short-term and for commercial farms, I find they are limited in their ability to capture the... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU)
ISSS Past President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Nadarajah Sriskandarajah

Prof. Nadarajah Sriskandarajah

Emeritus, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Friday July 7, 2017 09:00 - 18:00
BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, University of Vienna Gregor-Mendel-Straße 33, 1180 Wien, Austria
 
Saturday, July 8
 

09:00

Day 2 PhD/Graduate Programme
Introducing and using systems, tools, techniques, methods and methodologies combined with group work; Articulating your PFMS model.

Chairs
avatar for Chris Blackmore

Chris Blackmore

Senior Lecturer in Environmental & Development Systems, The Open University, UK
Particularly interested in social learning systems and communities of practice. Currently teaching and doing research. At the OU I chair Masters level courses on systems thinking in practice and environmental decision making. Also working on CADWAGO project...climate adaptation and... Read More →
avatar for Assoc.Prof. Dr. Ika Darnhofer

Assoc.Prof. Dr. Ika Darnhofer

Institute of Agricultural and Forestry Economics, BOKU (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences)
PhD (Graduate) Course Leader: Systems Thinking in Research Practice, 7 – 14 July | | My research focus is on management and decision making on family farms.Although I appreciate the value of the various tools of neoclassical economics for informing farm management on the short-term and for commercial farms, I find they are limited in their ability to capture the... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU)
ISSS Past President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Nadarajah Sriskandarajah

Prof. Nadarajah Sriskandarajah

Emeritus, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Saturday July 8, 2017 09:00 - 18:00
BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, University of Vienna Gregor-Mendel-Straße 33, 1180 Wien, Austria
 
Sunday, July 9
 

09:00

Day 3 PhD/Graduate Programme
Views from history of the systems field; the role of systemic design and institutions in leading and enabling ‘system change’. Protocols for the group-based systemic inquiry and final presentation.

Chairs
avatar for Chris Blackmore

Chris Blackmore

Senior Lecturer in Environmental & Development Systems, The Open University, UK
Particularly interested in social learning systems and communities of practice. Currently teaching and doing research. At the OU I chair Masters level courses on systems thinking in practice and environmental decision making. Also working on CADWAGO project...climate adaptation and... Read More →
avatar for Assoc.Prof. Dr. Ika Darnhofer

Assoc.Prof. Dr. Ika Darnhofer

Institute of Agricultural and Forestry Economics, BOKU (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences)
PhD (Graduate) Course Leader: Systems Thinking in Research Practice, 7 – 14 July | | My research focus is on management and decision making on family farms.Although I appreciate the value of the various tools of neoclassical economics for informing farm management on the short-term and for commercial farms, I find they are limited in their ability to capture the... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU)
ISSS Past President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Nadarajah Sriskandarajah

Prof. Nadarajah Sriskandarajah

Emeritus, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Sunday July 9, 2017 09:00 - 18:00
BOKU, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, University of Vienna Gregor-Mendel-Straße 33, 1180 Wien, Austria

10:00

Morning Workshop: 3057 Systems Basics: Systemic solutions with evidence-based medicine for better concentrations - the systems thinking for everyone's mind through the teaching of Buddha on the eastern systems science of Five Aggregates 系統論基礎工作坊:循證醫學提高專注力
System Basics workshop Sunday morning
The ability to concentrate has grown in importance in the ever speeding pace of modern society. The feedback cycle of information and matter are getting faster and faster. Moreover, multi-tasking has become a fundamental prerequisite for daily work. Furthermore, quality of services and quantity of serving duration keep increasing. All these factors require our good concentration. Research has been carried out to evaluate different treatments using evidence-based medicine methodologies. One of the treatments is the observation of one’s breath, namely Anapana, and its extension to the observation of the bodily sensations called Vipassana. In this workshop we will practice the mini version of the treatment.
From the analysis of the practice, we will try to find the common structure and relationship that can be generalized using systems thinking which could help us understand how our minds work. Research has shown that this systems thinking is rooted from the teaching of Buddha.
The application of system theory requires the understanding of ourselves and of each other, the nature, and the past and future possibilities in a systemic way. That is, we need to understand both the structure and dynamics of our physical body systems, and of our mental mind observations. Research shows that the composition of our body and that of our mind may be explained by the same system theory relating to energy, matter, life and information. We employed this simple ancient system theory as taught by Buddha to investigate how our naturally systemic-structured mind arbitrarily developed all the non-systemic and problematic way of thinking.  We use our body to experience the world around us but our mind is the one which is observing and making decisions to change the world. System theory sees the world as composing of observers, decision makers, systems, the environment, the boundaries and relationships between them.  There are in effect two opposite forces in the world that constantly interact with each other, creating a flow of energy, matter and information between systems and the environment. On one hand we have the disorder force governed by the second law of thermodynamics that drives everything into an equilibrium state with maximum entropy. On the other hand we have the organizational force governed by the constraints of a system that drives the system into a particular desired steady state with a low entropy.
Our minds are both the observer and the decision maker confronting a major problem. Throughout our life we look for satisfaction that brings happiness. Our government has been relying on economics to achieve this but 80% of the time we are dissatisfied with the people and situations around us, giving rise to craving, aversion and ignorance in our minds and creating all sorts of problems in our society. This is called suffering in the teaching of Buddha, and he offered us a three step solution for our mind. In this workshop we will investigate the systemic view of these three steps, namely self-protection, concentration and purification of mind. We will also investigate a 10-day Vipassana mental healthcare program for people of all religions including scientific communities. It is believed that such a program could bring happiness, peace and harmony for our society.
Is death the end of our lives or just the beginning of another new life? A system undergoes a transition of system state upon death, but will the system continue in other forms at other places? Or will it just terminate totally? What are the possible new system states and are they sustainable? In this workshop we will investigate the sustainability of Heaven, Hell, Earth and Nibbana (null).  We will also investigate the way to prepare ourselves to transit into these states.  
Keywords: Evidence-based medicine 循證醫學,Vipassana mental healthcare內觀靜坐, Buddha middle path (middle way) 佛法中觀,Concentration 集中力, self-protection 戒,Purification of our minds 淨化心靈,organizational force組織力, entropy熵, second law of thermodynamics熱力學第二定律, Energy-Matter Life-Information 能量物質-信息生命,Craving Aversion Ignorance Wisdom 貪嗔癡智, feedback 反饋, Happiness 快樂, Harmony 和諧, Health and system thinking Special Integration Groups SIG 健康與系統思維特別整合分組, Eastern Systems Thinking 東方系統思維,Heaven and Hell 天堂與地獄, Life and Death 生死, Nibbana 涅槃, Unification o f nature and man 天人合一, 80% of the time are spent on 20% of the satisfactions in life 人生不如意事十常八九, Spirituality and Systems 靈性與系統
Supporting Agencies: Ancient Balance Medicine Research and Education Fund Foundation Ltd.



Chairs
Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Thomas Wong

Thomas Wong

SIG Chair: Health and Systems Thinking, Ancient Balance Medicine Education Centre
SIG Chair: Health and Systems ThinkingBachelor of Engineering with First Class Honours in ITBachelor of Traditional Chinese MedicineMaster of Engineering in TelecommunicationTherapist of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deep Tissue pain therapy (1991-now)Chair of Health and Systems Thinking... Read More →


Sunday July 9, 2017 10:00 - 12:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 124, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:00

Full-Day INCOSE Workshop: 3247 Towards the Unification of Systems Science and Systems Engineering
Systems Modelling and Systems Engineering SIG  In this workshop on-going efforts to improve the understanding of unifying concepts and paradigms are presented.  The workshop will be presented in three Modules.
Module 1: Unification has been a clear goal of the College Publication Systems Series that involves a cooperative effort involving the BCSSS as well as Stevens Institute of Technology.  Highlights of some of the unifying concepts and paradigms that have evolved in the series will be presented. 
Module 2:  An important unifying concept is the notion of the “systemist”.  Characteristics of how a systemist deals with any situation, problem or opportunity are presented.  The systemist approach is based on an innovative “Systems Tree” that identifies an epistemology, ontology and semantics of systems, as well as how to move from thinking to an effective value added action (axiology).  In the workshop, highlights of this unifying innovative explanation of the role of the systemist is presented.
Module 3: The systemist approach to unification will be illustrated by presenting some of the highlights of a new volume in preparation for the Systems Series that addresses biological and medical systems.
Target audience There are no special requirements as this workshop will be useful to professionals, faculty and students alike.  It is expected that the participants will attend the entire workshop in order to obtain a well-rounded view of concepts, principles and multiple paradigms that will useful in their future activities.
Size of the group
From min 6 to max 40 people. A max of 40 people (5 groups of 8 people) if we do some practice during sessions (particularly session 2)
Duration – Full day workshop 8 hours as followed
6 hours
+ 90’ break for lunch
+ 15’ break in the morning
+ 15’break in the afternoon



Chairs
avatar for Dr. Harold W. (Bud) Lawson

Dr. Harold W. (Bud) Lawson

Professor Emeritus, Lawson Konsult AB
Harold "Bud" Lawson (born 1937) is a software engineer, computer architect and systems engineer. Lawson is credited with the 1964 invention of the pointer.[1] In 2000, Lawson was presented the Computer Pioneer Award by the IEEE [2] for his invention. | In July, 2010 he published... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Brigitte Daniel Allegro

Brigitte Daniel Allegro

Retired - Systems Thinking Consulting, Systems Thinking Conculting
Brigitte Daniel Allegro Senior Expert Adviser in Systems Thinking and Dependability - Design & Art teacher - Independent consultant and author (art books & systems thinking books) and also… grandmother. Brigitte built her experience on dependability concerns, systems engineering... Read More →
avatar for Gary Smith

Gary Smith

Senior Systems Engineer, Airbus Defence and Space
SIG Chair: Knowledge and Systems Sciences | | Analytical Chemist, Systems Analyst, Software Engineering, Engineering Project Management, Commercial Project Management, International Working, Process Improvement, IT, Defence and Security and Biological Systems experience. | | Specialties:Systems... Read More →


Sunday July 9, 2017 10:00 - 17:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:00

Full-Day Workshop: 3248 A New Way of Thinking - Introduction to Systems Thinking & Easy-to-Use Systems Tools
Introduction to afternoon workshops, especially for industry people: Evolutionary Learning Laboratories; Participatory information gathering and integrating different mental models, Causal Loop Diagrams, Bayesian Networks, Sensimod, identification of leverage points and systemic interventions to manage complex problems in any area of interest. What will I get out of the Workshop?
  • Understand what is Systems Thinking, complex systems, multi-dimensional nature of issues facing managers, etc.
  • Appreciate interconnectedness between different components of systems
  • Awareness of easy-to-use systems tools
  • Practical experience to unravel complexity and how to find long-term systemic solutions
  • How to develop systemic policies and management plans 
Who should be attending this unique Learning Experience?

EVERYONE
regardless of your background; top and middle managers; students in all fields of study; decision makers and takers
– especially those who will attend workshops during the following week who seek a better understanding of systems thinking and approaches.

Modelling by Non-Modellers

  • Participatory Systems Analysis
  • Mechanisms for integrating different types and forms of knowledge, data (if available) and experiential knowledge of all people involved
  • Quantification of uncertainties in complex systems
  • Determining how to manage systemically (not to fall into the trap of treating symptoms)
  • Performing rapid diagnostic and sensitivity analysis – which factors have the biggest effect on the system as a whole
Cost: SUNDAY registration fee
Note:
Price includes:
  • Registration;
  • Text Book Systems Thinking for Everyone (Hard or electronic copy);
  • Seminars and tutoring by top systems scientists

Please make payment directly to ISSS as part of your registration for the conference. 



Chairs
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →
avatar for Dr Nam Nguyen

Dr Nam Nguyen

Director Australia & SE Asia, Malik Institute for Complexity Management, Governance and Leadership (Malik Institute), Switzerland
Nam Nguyen is a Director (Australia and Southeast Asia) of the Malik Institute, St. Gallen, Switzerland (one of the world’s leading organisations for holistic general management, leadership, governance and transformation solutions). | Nam is also a Honorary Visiting Research... Read More →

Sunday July 9, 2017 10:00 - 17:00
Ground Floor, Room HI 8, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:00

Full-Day Workshop: 3249 Illuminating patterns for coping with complexity with special focus on visualization and distributed analytics
The workshop should become a platform for an interdisciplinary communication between system experts and specialists for human-computer interaction, cognitive science, pattern oriented design and visual analytics.

The main target is to facilitate synergies between different areas of academic research and praxis in order to develop a generic framework of patterns to support analytical processes in coping with complexity.
The workshop will create an opportunity to gain insights in dynamic interactions between visualizing and sense constructing techniques, practical application of patterns and cybernetic design.

Speakers
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Gabriele Harrer-Puchner  Dipl. Geol.

Gabriele Harrer-Puchner Dipl. Geol.

Expert Sensitivity Analysis, Associate Malik St.Gallen
avatar for Maria Lenzi

Maria Lenzi

independent consulter, Lenzi Modeling&Simulation
about beauty of life, complexity, chaos, order, patterns, diagrams and art of science


Sunday July 9, 2017 10:00 - 17:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

Afternoon Tutorial: 3110 A Broad Survey of the Fragmented Domains of Systems Pathology: GST as a Unifier
ABSTRACT: We are particularly interested in ourselves as humans. When our human systems dysfunction, experience pathology, or fail we pay special attention. Illness and death of ourselves or our loved ones may be the most important events in our lives. This has resulted in the vast enterprise of medicine – a nearly $2 trillion/year industry in the U.S. alone.
But all systems experience dysfunction not just humans. If we can study our human body systems using medical science, perhaps we can use a general systems approach to study pathologies of ALL systems, at ALL scales and discover the primary, underlying causes of pathology of systemness in general. Patterns of how things work could become patterns of how things don’t work informing all the fragmented domains with meaningful new remedies for all kinds of dysfunctions not yet recognized as similar.
We will present a general-systems-based, top-down, new Systems Pathology enabled by Systems Processes Theory (SPT). This new approach has significant potential for integrating the many separated domains of conventional systems pathology. We advocate learning from the 5000-year history of conventional medicine by joining its lessons and practices to this new GST approach to Systems Pathology. This tutorial will present descriptions of the widest possible range of domains of “systems” pathology from the conventional discipline-based to the isomorphic and transdisciplinary (including SPT, LST, Systems Dynamics, other systems thinking tools & techniques, systems engineering traditions, risk & failure analysis, cell/molecular biology, and conventional, anatomical pathology). For each domain, we will present an exemplar approach, researcher, or collaboration and its results. But also for each we will try to relate its current status to the potential unification of Systems Pathology using SPT.
This tutorial will also act as an Introduction to the ISSS’17 Joint SIG Sessions on Systems Pathology and Systems Biology/Evolution because this conference will serve as the second official event (with the previous INCOSE IW’17 in Jan) for the founding of a new professional society, the International Society for Systems Pathology (ISSP). The tutorial will end with a presentation of a Manifesto for Systems Pathology, By-Laws and Articles of Incorporation for the new ISSP, and a call for Founding Members.


Chairs
avatar for Len Troncale

Len Troncale

SIG Chair: Systems Biology and Evolution, SIG Chair: Systems Pathology, California State Polytechnic University
SIG Chair: Joint Session(s): Systems Pathology and Systems Biology & Evolution (see below for information)Dr. Len Troncale is Professor Emeritus of Cell and Molecular Biology, and past Chairman of the Biology Department at California State Polytechnic University. He is also Director... Read More →

Sunday July 9, 2017 14:00 - 17:00
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

Afternoon Workshop: 3058 Systems Basics: Systemic solutions with evidence-based medicine for relief from Insomnia - the systems thinking for everyone's body through Traditional Chinese Medicine on the eastern systems science of Taichi Yin-Yang Five Elemen
System Basics workshop Sunday afternoon
Insomnia has become a modern city sickness. Research has been carried out to evaluate different Traditional Chinese Medicine treatments using evidence-based medicine methodologies. The cause of insomnia may come from one or more of the five elements systems, including the Wood mental system, the Fire emotional system, the Metal behavioural system, the Water spiritual system, and the Earth physical system (with one or more of its five sub-systems).
From this analysis we will try to find the common structure and relationship that can be generalized using systems thinking which could be applied to treat different sickness and promote healthcare. Research has shown that this systems thinking is rooted in the fundamental concept in traditional Chinese culture since around 500BC. The concept is also embedded in the teaching of Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The traditional Chinese system theories under investigation include the Taichi yin-yang system theory, the Five systems theory of the human mind, and the Traditional Chinese Medicine differential diagnosis-cure process. These theories are found to be related to different modern system theories including Viable system model.
Taichi yin-yang system theory describes the relationship between any two entities (element/process) at any level of interest. It concerns the quantitative and qualitative changes between the entities. This is related to causal loop diagram (CLD) in system dynamics which uses reinforcing loop and balancing loop. The observer is not specified in the theories, but the perspectives of the observer actually determine the entities, the unit of quantitative changes, and the ratio of qualitative changes. The Five systems theory of the human mind is one of the important concepts developed in the teaching of Buddha. The Five systems are: awareness, perspective, sensation, action and physical object. These five systems can be used to describe the properties of the observer and the decision maker.
The Traditional Chinese Medicine differential diagnosis-cure process is a practical systemic process that has been used daily for more than 2000 years. It is believed that the whole macroscopic-microscopic spectrum of systems can be suitably accommodated. The system state identification involves three pairs of direction-forming spectrums. The Superficial and Internal spectrum gathers information between the boundary and the system. The Cold and Hot spectrum gathers information between the form and function, or matter and energy within the system. The Deficient and Excess spectrum gathers information between the environment and the system. Strategy can then be formulated to regulate and maintain the system.
Keywords: Evidence-based medicine 循證醫學,Insomnia 失眠,Five aggregates systems of human mind 五蘊系統,  Traditional Chinese medicine differential diagnosis-cure process 中醫辨證論治系統,Confucius Golden Mean 儒家中庸之道,Taoism 道家思想,Buddha middle path (middle way) 佛法中觀, Yin-Yang Five Elements i ± 1 System 陰陽五行天地人系統, General System Theory 廣義系統論, Health and system thinking Special Integration Groups SIG 健康與系統思維特別整合分組, Eastern Systems Thinking 東方系統思維,Causal loop diagram CLD,  quantitative and qualitative changes, System dynamics, Viable system model VSM,Unification of nature and man 天人合一, Cold-Hot spectrum 寒熱譜, Deficient-Excess spectrum 虛實譜, Superficial-Internal spectrum 表裏譜
 
Supporting Agencies: Ancient Balance Medicine Research and Education Fund Foundation Ltd.
 


Chairs
Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Thomas Wong

Thomas Wong

SIG Chair: Health and Systems Thinking, Ancient Balance Medicine Education Centre
SIG Chair: Health and Systems ThinkingBachelor of Engineering with First Class Honours in ITBachelor of Traditional Chinese MedicineMaster of Engineering in TelecommunicationTherapist of Traditional Chinese Medicine Deep Tissue pain therapy (1991-now)Chair of Health and Systems Thinking... Read More →


Sunday July 9, 2017 14:00 - 17:00

19:00

#ISSS2017 Official Opening & Gala Event @ Rathous (Town Hall, Vienna)
FORMAL EVENING GALA OPENING IN RATHAUS

ENTRANCE AT Lichtenfelsgasse 2, Feststiege 1.

DRESS CODE:  MINIMUM Smart Business Dress
UNDERGROUND STATION:  RATHAUS



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If you need to purchase a ticket, please:
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** Click on this event to say that you are attending  **
THE INVITATION

We have the pleasure of inviting you to the #ISSS2017 Official Opening and Gala Dinner at the Rathaus Wein.
The Office of the Mayor of the City of Vienna welcome the participants of the #ISSS2017 World Conference to Vienna.
This prestigious black tie/evening event will officially open the Conference including the presentation of the #ISSS2017 Student Awards.
Built in the late 19th century the Festival Hall was the biggest hall in the country where theoretically 1,500 couples can waltz simultaneously.
We hope that you will be able to join us to savour the wonderful Viennese food, wine, music and hospitality under 16 magnificent chandeliers and watched over by four great Viennese composers:  Mozart, Haydn, Gluck and Schubert on the walls to commence this eminent gathering of scientists, researchers, businessmen and government.
Dress:    Black Tie / Evening attire
Cost:       The Event is free for full-week attendees and US$49 for additional tickets.


Chairs
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan

ISSS Team
avatar for Dr. Jennifer Wilby

Dr. Jennifer Wilby

Vice President Admin, ISSS
In 1978 Wilby started working in urban planning, followed by database programming and textbook publishing. From 1994-97 she worked as a Research Assistant in the Centre for Systems Studies at the University of Hull and then from 1997-99 at the University of Lincoln. From 1999 to 2004... Read More →
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →


Sunday July 9, 2017 19:00 - 20:30
Rathaus (Town Hall), Vienna Friedrich-Schmidt-Platz 1, 1010 Wien, Austria
 
Monday, July 10
 

07:15

#ISSS2017 Vienna Roundtable
Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below) | | Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science... Read More →

Monday July 10, 2017 07:15 - 08:30
Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Sciences Paulanergasse 13, 1040 Wien, Austria

08:00

Morning Registration Desk Open
Foyer

Monday July 10, 2017 08:00 - 13:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

08:45

Day 1 Introduction: From State Affairs to Viable Democracies in a Changing World to Risk and Crisis Management and the Freedom and Security of Citizens
Government & Governance Day

Political institutions and governments, from regional to national and supra-national scale, are applying advanced approaches in politics to tackle large-scale multi-stakeholder complex issues. The conference will showcase examples of legislation and investment decision processes enabled through systems thinking and systems design, highlighting the pressing problems of financing states in the transformation of the economy, of migration & sociodemographic changes leading to heterogeneous citizenships, and the aim of developing integrative and reflected societies in a vivid science and political practice dialogue.

The conference will critically assess the opportunities to strengthen communities based on the principle of mutual solidarity (Solidargemeinschaften) and social justice in today’s world, and subsequent people´s participation processes in the public sphere, as well as the areas of conflict in newly regulated societies and applied digital surveillance while meeting the demands of protection, security and freedom of citizens.


Monday July 10, 2017 08:45 - 09:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:30

Conference Opening: ISSS Vice President, Dr Jennifer Wilby
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Jennifer Wilby

Dr. Jennifer Wilby

Vice President Admin, ISSS
In 1978 Wilby started working in urban planning, followed by database programming and textbook publishing. From 1994-97 she worked as a Research Assistant in the Centre for Systems Studies at the University of Hull and then from 1997-99 at the University of Lincoln. From 1999 to 2004... Read More →


Monday July 10, 2017 09:30 - 09:35
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:35

Conference Opening: ISSS President, Professor Ockie Bosch
Speakers
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →


Monday July 10, 2017 09:35 - 09:45
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:45

Conference Opening: ISSS Vice President Conference, Stefan Blachfellner
Speakers
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan


Monday July 10, 2017 09:45 - 10:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:00

Keynote Science: 'Inclusive Systemic Thinking supporting the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda' - Dr Anne Stephens & Dr Ellen Lewis
#3168 Inclusive Systemic Thinking supporting the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda (PLENARY)

Anne Stephens and Ellen Lewis will focus on their recent work conducted in Panajachel, Guatemala, exploring the place-based, local responses to the UN Sustainable Development Goals and monitoring and evaluation mechanisms that contribute to the building of global governance systems in the Agenda 2030 era. They will introduce their GEMs Framework (Gender equality, Environments and voices from the Margins).


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Ellen Lewis

Dr. Ellen Lewis

Senior Partner, Ethos of Engagement Consulting
Dr. Ellen Lewis: is a bilingual native speaker (English/Spanish) global organization development (OD) consultant and systems thinker with 30 years’ experience in gender equality, change management, governance and leadership, capacity building, program design, evaluation and strategic... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Anne Stephens

Dr. Anne Stephens

Senior Researcher, The Cairns Institute, James Cook University
Anne Stephens is a Lecturer and Senior Researcher with the College of Arts, Society and Education and the Cairns Institute at James Cook University. | Anne has a PhD in Sociology from the University of Queensland (2012). Her field of interest is in gender and critical systems thinking... Read More →


Monday July 10, 2017 10:00 - 10:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:30

Keynote Practice: Nikolaus von Peter, EC Transport
Speakers
avatar for Nikolaus von Peter

Nikolaus von Peter

Member of Cabinet, Transport, European Commission
Responsibilities | Maritime transport, including maritime safety and ports | Sustainable and intelligent transport | Transport innovation and research | Non-portfolio: | Energy and Climate action | Maritime Affairs and Fisheries and Environment | Research, Science and Innovation... Read More →


Monday July 10, 2017 10:30 - 11:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:00

11:15

Break / Networking
Monday July 10, 2017 11:15 - 11:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:30

Government & Governance Panel Session: Dr. Erhard Busek, DI Johannes Gollner, Prof, Ulrike Guerot, Prof. Allena Leonard
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Erhard Busek

Dr. Erhard Busek

Founding Member, European Center for Environmental Economy (ECEE)
Born in Vienna, Austria, on March 25, 1941, Erhard Busek received his law degree from the University of Vienna in 1963. During his studies, he also served as Chairman of the Austrian Youth Council. | | He began his professional career 1964 as legal adviser to the Association of... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Ulrike Guérot

Prof. Ulrike Guérot

Founder & Director, European Democracy Lab
Ulrike Guérot is Founder and Director of the European Democracy Lab at the European School of Governance in Berlin. She writes about European Democracy and global Europe, has taught at renowned universities in Europe and the US and has 20 years experience in the European think tank... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Allenna Leonard

Dr. Allenna Leonard

Principal, Complementary Set, Cwarel Isaf Institute
Allenna Leonard is an independent consultant in Toronto who worked with Stafford Beer from the early eighties to his death in 2002. She works with non-profit and business organizations applying cybernetic approaches and models, primarily although not wholly those of Stafford Beer... Read More →


Monday July 10, 2017 11:30 - 12:15
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

12:15

12:30

Lunch
Monday July 10, 2017 12:30 - 14:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

2998 Positive Systems Science: Bringing Together Positivity, Complexity, and Temporality
Positive Systems Science (PSS) explicitly brings together the strength-based lens of positive psychology with the complex, holistic lens of systems science, with the ultimate goal of bringing about desired change that supports the wellbeing of human social systems. This presentation opens an interdisciplinary conversation about how positivity, complexity, and temporality come together.
The field of positive psychology focuses on positivity, including understanding and building happiness, the “good life”, and optimal functioning in individuals, organizations, and broader communities. Among the psychological sciences, it is one of the most applied areas, successfully connecting with researchers, professionals, policy makers, and the general public.
Systems science incorporates complexity, considering aspects such as feedback, unintended consequences, dynamic associations, and changes that occur within any given system. It has developed a range of tools that can be used to understand and address the complexity of human life.
Underlying practice and research in both of these fields is temporality – how factors and events unfold, interplay, and change over time.
Systems science and positive psychology both have strengths and weaknesses, and we suggest that the synthesis of the two perspectives will create frameworks, tools, and applications that are greater than either perspective alone. Such an approach does not simply identify and address existing problems, but generates pathways toward yet unimagined futures.
We will show how existing areas of research and practice reflect aspects of PSS, including youth development, organizational scholarship, public health, and social ecology. These examples illustrate the PSS framework and begin to link relevant areas of scholarship and practice.

Chairs
avatar for Dr. John Vodonick

Dr. John Vodonick

SIG Chair: Systemic Ethics, Exploratory Group: Business Systems Laboratory, Two Ravens Consulting
I teach, write and consult in the areas of corporate social responsibility, change management, organizational design and social ethics. Most organizations come to a place in their evolution when the needs of the stakeholders are not being met and if that continues to be the norm the... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
AP

Ass. Prof. Lindsay Oades

Director, Centre for Positive Psychology, University of Melbourne


Monday July 10, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3013 Maturity Models in Systems Research and Practice
In 2016, a team of scholars met in a gathering sponsored by the International Federation for Systems Research (IFSR), to discuss how systems research could support the increase of systems literacy worldwide. Members of this team developed a conceptual model of the role of systems research in developing such literacy. One consideration this model identified was that people engage with the “systems world” from the vantage point of numerous roles: systems scientist, systems researcher, system engineer, systems philosopher, etc.. Each of these roles demands particular competencies with respect to systems theory and practice. Future research must be done to identify the competencies particular to each role. Alongside such research, there is a need to identify a maturity profile for each role – how we can assess the degree to which a person is effectively executing the competencies required to do good systems work.
Maturity models are utilized in several industries, in the attempts to cultivate and evaluate people’s ability to effectively execute complex tasks . This paper will examine current thought about the value and pitfalls of maturity models. To further the IFSR ‘s work of promoting world class systems research, it will identify principles and exemplars that can guide the development of maturity models for the varied roles people take in the systems world.

Monday July 10, 2017 14:00 - 14:30

14:00

3033 Applications of Systems Thinking in Sustainability Assessment Methods: The Case for Alternative Vehicle Options
Assessing sustainability of systems requires integration of various approaches, methods, and disciplines. Although Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) has been a widely accepted method to assess environmental sustainability of products, processes, and goods, it has some limitations such as isolated way of assessing the environmental impacts with no consideration of social and economic impacts. In this regard, LCA method has been transforming into a new framework known as life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA), which proposes improvement in three dimensions: (1) inclusion of social and economic indicators in addition to the environmental impacts, (2) broadening the scope of analysis from product-level impacts to quantification of macro-level economy-wide impacts, (3) deepening the assessment mechanisms to capture and understand the interrelations, feedback mechanisms, rebound effects, scenario-analysis, stakeholder involvement, and uncertainties. In this study, challenges related to these dimensions, applications from recent literature, and future perspectives are discussed along with a case study and a comprehensive literature review. According to the literature review, there is a lack of collaboration among the environmental, social, and economic disciplines. Among the applications of LCSA studies, only few (3 out of 56) studies were able to quantify sustainability impacts at global scale, meaning encompassing complex supply chains at global level. Furthermore, rebound and feedback effects of the system-of-interest were not studied sufficiently. In terms of methods applied in the field of LCSA, there were a high degree of diversity among the tools, methods, and approaches. In this regard, there is a strong need for developing a common system language and bringing tools, disciplines, and methods to overcome challenges associated with assessing sustainability. As a case study, life cycle sustainability assessment of alternative vehicle technologies, in the U.S. is conducted using a system dynamics model in which economic, social, and the environmental impacts of various alternative vehicle types are quantified until 2050. The proposed model captured complex dynamic relationships between economy, society, the environment, and the U.S. transportation. Alternative vehicle options include including battery electric vehicles (BEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and internal combustion vehicles (ICVs). Extreme customer choice scenarios are tested for each vehicle type to compare their maximum potential impacts. BEVs are found to be a better alternative for most of sustainability impact categories in long run, while they are economically not preferable until mid-2020s. Analysis results revealed that any alternative vehicle option, alone, cannot reduce the rapidly increasing atmospheric temperature and the negative impacts of the global climate change, even though the entire fleet is replaced with the most environmental friendly vehicle option. In addition, the impacts from feedbacks within the society, economy, and the environment are found to be smaller compared to exogenous drivers such as existing and expected trends in population, economy, and global warming. This study exemplifies the advancements in life cycle assessment methods and aims to strengthen the transformation of the current sustainability assessment methods by considering all of the inherent mutual and dynamic relationships in the environmental, social, and economic aspects.

Monday July 10, 2017 14:00 - 14:30

14:00

3061 A Systems View of Violence and Some Paradoxes in Working with Violent Abusers
This paper commences with a theoretical underpinning of the nature of violence from a systems perspective, exploring the interactions between parts and wholes where boundaries are transgressed or vital flows are disrupted. A case study of Rangi, a perpetrator of family violence, who is a composite of people the author has worked with over the years, is then used to demonstrate how systems principles can be used to understand the nature of human violence on an individual level and to inform ways of working with clients aiming to reduce the frequency and severity of violence in their lives and the people around them. The focus then shifts to structural violence imposed on the parts of the system by the whole. First, this is examined at a societal level, then returning to the case study of Rangi, there is an exploration of structural violence within the criminal justice system revealing paradoxes to be confronted in working with violent clients.

Monday July 10, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

14:00

WORKSHOP: 'Interconnected thinking for climate protection' - Gabriele Harrer
Gabriele HarrerInterconnected thinking for climate protection A co-operative and system oriented process between citizens and political administration. New approaches are necessary to allow peoples participation to meet the demands of citizens and political administration. Currently society is coping with the complexity of climate change and the objectives of CO2-reduction-targets. Smaller communities are the basis of the future viability of regions and countries. If measures are developed in an interactive and transparent process, their implementation and acceptance will define the paths for a future development of viability. In this pilot project, citizens learn to apply and implement systemic approaches on complex issues of all kind. After a playful introduction into systems thinking with the strategic simulation game ecopolicy®, the participants will apply the Malik Sensitivity Model® and develop and validate measures for their municipality on this systemic basis. Making the complexity of decision making processes and the interconnection of measures understandable, measures will be implemented rather fast and strengthen the mutual solidarity and further developments. The pilot project in Murg, Germany is part of an European Project. The unique project will be worked out as a template for an easy applicable, systems based participatory approach for communal activities in order to cope with climate protection).

Chairs
avatar for Gabriele Harrer-Puchner  Dipl. Geol.

Gabriele Harrer-Puchner Dipl. Geol.

Expert Sensitivity Analysis, Associate Malik St.Gallen

Monday July 10, 2017 14:00 - 17:30
SR 122 Institut für Computertechnik, TU Wien

14:00

Afternoon Registration Desk Open
Foyer, Campus Gusshaus

Monday July 10, 2017 14:00 - 17:30
Foyer G

14:30

2997 Systems Science Goes to the Movies: Using Positive Psychology to Bring Systems Science to Everyone AND 2995 A Re-Envisioning of Leverage Points using Positive Psychology
Positive psychology provides a platform for bringing systems science to life. The field has rapidly captured the attention of researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and the general public. We suggest that positive psychology can add value to systems science by making tools and theories more useable, practical, and engaging.

Positive psychology examines what makes a good life. The field has developed numerous interventions and strategies to help people thrive. However, there is a tendency to focus on individuals, ignoring the complex context in which the person resides. Systems science has much to offer to research and practice in positive psychology, and yet the terms and concepts can be inaccessible.

The creativity of positive psychologists can help make systems tools and theories more approachable. For example, the Pixar movie “Inside Out” illustrates multiple perspectives within and between each character (personified as joy, sadness, anger, fear, and disgust characters within each person’s head), inter-relationships of the system (e.g., actions by the emotions impact how Riley behaves, and experiences impact the structure within Riley’s brain), and unintended consequences of a given action. This workshop will illustrate how movies and other mediums can strip away jargon and illustrate key systems principles in a more accessible manner.

Monday July 10, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3027 Understanding Human Activity Systems: A Study using Systems Principles
Heuristic methods have provided, to differing degrees of success, the means to design and manage the human activity systems that support the realization of engineered systems. However, as the complexity of engineering systems has increased, the effectiveness of the heuristic methods to design and manage the realization of the system has decreased. Furthermore, the constrains that heuristic methods inherently possess limit their evolution and the ability of systems and engineering managers to understand how emergence in human activity systems rises and how can it be managed. Von Bertalanffy argued that deriving a theory of universal principles applying to systems in general is imperative. Considering that human activity systems are notional systems, which express purposeful human activities and can be used to study possible changes in complex real-world situations, then a team is defined as the elemental form of a human activity system. In this case, a team is an emergent result of individuals joining into human activity systems. In this research, the authors propose to study teams using systems principles Rousseau proposed. Gaining understanding of the principles that drive the emergence of the capabilities of teams and human activity systems will assist systems and engineering managers efficiently design and manage complex human activity systems.

Monday July 10, 2017 14:30 - 15:00

14:30

3094 Applying System Dynamics: Case Management Implementation in an Argentinean Justice of Peace Court
This article explores how systems dynamics combined with employee empowerment can be used to reduce timeframes on key stages in court proceedings. This analysis is done from the empirical perspective of a Justice of Peace Court in Argentina, where the researcher and the team of The Lobos City Justice of Peace Court, the practitioners, worked together towards a common goal using action research as methodology. The implementation took place between February 2014 and May 2017 and the key research objectives were to explore on how collective transformation, as a motor for time reduction, can be enhanced through four forms of engagement: creation of awareness, self-implementation of innovative methodologies, understanding systems dynamics and building “Team Pride” as a core value. The article is structured as follows.

Initially, it is presented the background story of the project in Lobos City Justice of the Peace Court, then, by combining insights from the case and previous literature, the author unpacks the four forms of engagement. The stages of implementation are presented including in-depth interviews and workshops, results and feedback loop. To test the hypothesis, the author performed a non-parametric Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon test, comparing two data sets (previous and during the implementation timeframes). Finally, a set of conclusions are discussed and presented together with potential areas for further considerations like challenges of implementation in courts with higher amount of cases.

Monday July 10, 2017 14:30 - 15:00

14:30

3185 I'm Against the Grand Plan
Grand plans can be seductive. A grand political plan to save the country. A grand scientific plan to save the planet. A grand plan to lose that last fifteen pounds. But I don’t believe in grand plans. I believe only in try and fail and try again. Inspect and adapt. Try something, mess it up and fix it. Venture outside your comfort zone and learn something.

In this talk, Daryl will look at how certain trends in software development, known as “iterative and incremental” might help with academic work in systems thinking. Several prominent systems thinkers have lamented how hard it is to teach systems thinking models. Why is that? Is it because the students are not prepared? Or because we are teaching the wrong way? Join Daryl for an interactive dialogue on this topic.

Monday July 10, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:00

2996 From the Science of Positive Psychology to Systemic Solutions for Education: Strategically using Language to Positively Impact Mindsets
ABSTRACT: Positive education is a relatively new area which applies the science of positive psychology to education. It emphasizes well-being and academic achievement as complementary goals of education. Yet the educational context is complex and dynamic, and simplistic psychological interventions can be ineffective at best and harmful at worst when this complexity and the underlying structures of the system are ignored.
Systems science provides theories and tools that adequately recognize the complexity of educational systems. Yet although the field acknowledges that mindsets are a key lever for change, it lacks strategies to successfully shift those mindsets, many of which are formed and solidified through the adolescent years.
This presentation will illustrate how language provides one avenue for bridging the systems perspective with the science of positive psychology to positively impact mindsets at both individual and collective levels within educational settings. Language enables social interactions and provides a sense of meaning and connection amongst people. How a person speaks says a lot about who they are, where they are from, and the experiences they have had. Slight word changes can significantly change the meaning of a sentence or the tone of a conversation.
Notably, simple shifts in language play an important role in shifting an individual’s mindset from resistance to possibility, and in shifting a school’s culture from welfare to well-being. Drawing on several case studies, we illustrate how the strategic use of a common, positive language offers a strategic approach for shifting individual and collective mindsets in a sustainable, positive manner.

Monday July 10, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:00

3028 Integration of Sustainability Performance Indicators and the Viable System Model Toward a Sustainable Systems Assessment Methodology
Reports on the progress of sustainability research have increased significantly during the past decades. The developmental milestones of sustainability are consistent with the post-normal versus traditional science, where trans-disciplinary and policy/action research are among the important criteria to be added to traditional analysis approach. This requires a new perspective to look at the problem at hand: we are no longer considering a group of users with common and self-interested goals when defining the scope of sustainability studies. This in turn requires sustainability indicators that can capture largely diverse but relevant measurements to completely represent the different perspectives that must be fulfilled, and methodologies that focus on heuristics, systemic stability, control, and feedback, versus traditional optimization for mechanistic problems. The present study attempts to build upon current established connection between sustainability and viability, specifically how the Viable System Model offers a framework for organizational systems to consistently perform self-adapting mechanisms to cope with internal and external sustainability challenges, and how these capabilities can help organizations achieve their sustainability development goals. A sustainability assessment model that integrates both the sustainability indicators approach and Viable System Model has also been developed and presented here.

Monday July 10, 2017 15:00 - 15:30

15:00

3092 A Practical Application of Critical Systems Thinking to Improve a Business Intelligence System’s Business Requirements
This article explores how systems dynamics combined with employee empowerment can be used to reduce timeframes on key stages in court proceedings. This analysis is done from the empirical perspective of a Justice of Peace Court in Argentina, where the researcher and the team of The Lobos City Justice of Peace Court, the practitioners, worked together towards a common goal using action research as methodology. The implementation took place between February 2014 and May 2017 and the key research objectives were to explore on how collective transformation, as a motor for time reduction, can be enhanced through four forms of engagement: creation of awareness, self-implementation of innovative methodologies, understanding systems dynamics and building “Team Pride” as a core value. The article is structured as follows.


Monday July 10, 2017 15:00 - 15:30

15:00

3134 The ∞2 Model of Multidimensional Intelligences Theory
In the intelligent web era, the measure of intelligence can no longer depends on the linear model. The various multidimensional measurements, such as integer dimension, topological dimension, fractional dimension, negative dimension, etc., shoud be taken into serious account. Based on these multidimensional measurement, we could further apply grand multidimensional design–a meta-ontology (or upper, fundamental ontology) to integrate human wisdom and compassion into machine knowledge. The ∞2 model represented as a multidimensional intelligences theory with meta-ontology could help realize the grand multidimensional design. In this paper, the author will first pinpoint the advent of multidimensional super-intelligent era which might come much sooner than we could imagine. With deeper understanding of the core concept of the super-intelligent era, the author will then highlight the significance of human adaptability to multidimensional thinking. Secondly, the author will compare 20 contemporary available meta-ontology or upper ontologies, and trace their deficiency in responding to the creative design of the grand multidimensional measurements. Thirdly, towards a dynamic semantic web, the author will apply a dynamic multidimensional matrix to describe the ∞2 model of multidimensional intelligences theory. The dynamic multidimensional matrix is based on the multidimensional nonlinear language, which has been shown in the TV series Earth Final Conflict (1997) and in the film Arrival (2016). It might provide great possibilities to resolve the constraints imposed by small display media and linear language. By further research and applications, it is expected that machine knowledge and human wisdom and compassion could be more delicately integrated by synthesizing the most general 42 elements in the ∞2 model of multidimensional intelligences theory. The author contends that the ∞2 model of multidimensional intelligences theory will promote the integration of human-machine smart era, accelerate multi-level jump of the multidimensional intelligences, and nurture the new universe of ubiquitous web of things and beings.

Monday July 10, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3205 Supply Chain Network Risk Management
The importance of integrated risk management of supply chains is increasing as well as the dependence of critical or stategic infrastructures. Especially the dependence of energy supply and the information and communication technologies increases rapidly. On the other side new threats like Cyberthreats occured. Therefore the existing risk management systems fall too short and cannot match the existing complexity.

Within this publication there are some necessary steps explained for the development of an integrated Supply Chain Risk Monitoring and Supply Chain Risk Rating Model. The basis is a standardised categorisation system and then the red thread is explained with a bottom up process.

The goals are to develop an integrated Risk Monitoring and Risk Rating Model for defined Clusters as well as for the Supply Chain as a whole and the description of a Supply Chain Network Risk Monitoring System as well as a Supply Chain Network Risk Rating System. The background of these considerations are the improvement of the strategic and operational decision making process via innovative systems and models.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3000 Systemic Construction of a Space Launching Base in Mexico
The Mexican State, educational institutions and research centers have made efforts to found organisms, programs and projects, in order to promote spatial technological development, which appear and disappear without reaching the objective for which they were founded.
In order to achieve technological development, it is necessary to integrate government-academia-industry, and it is the Mexican Space Agency, an agency of the Mexican State which is responsible for carrying out this activity; Nevertheless the Agency establishes what must be done to reach the technological development but does not mentioned how to achieve it. For this reason, designing a systemic model was proposed which allows the integration of scientific research in companies based on market goals, objectives and strategies.
The systemic model has three stages within which are five phases and within them are eight subphases: The three stages are: input (I); Box (B); Output (O); O = IB, that is, I and B can be adjusted to achieve O. Holding fixed I and O. B will have infinite solutions. Ideally B = O / I = 1 in practice will be less than 1. Therefore the systemic model for the development of the Mexican special system has infinite solutions.
It is proposed that spatial technological development begins with the construction of a spatial launch base as ground conditions exist for space launches and would attract different companies such as satellite constructors, space launchers, fuel producers, tourism services, etc.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:00 - 16:30

16:00

3020 Liminal Consciousness - A Systemic Theory for 'Altered States of Consciousness'
Academic psychology focuses mainly on research regarding rational consciousness, while other forms of consciousness are first and foremost marginalized as ‘altered states of consciousness’. The indication of ‘altered states of consciousness’ consistently reproduces: firstly the positing of rational consciousness as a primal given; secondly the fixation on a (consciousness)process as a state; thirdly the mistake, to characterize something as ‘altered’ which is defined by constant alteration; fourthly a dichotomization of ‘normal’ and ‘altered’, which conceals the ongoing reproduction of rational consciousness; and fifthly the suggestion that non-rational consciousness is epistemically inferior, illegitimate and deviant. This paper aims to make a contribution to solving those problems, by focusing central aspects of autopoietic systems theory and the fundamental term liminality, which are then combined to a new theory of non-rational consciousness. In this paper the term ‘liminal consciousness’ is used, which refers to forms of a psychic system that are less focused on points of reference, rather they converge to the limit of (temporary) omission of its autopoiesis. This concept is not thought of as a dichotomous category, but rather as a continuously increasing omission of the reproduction of self-referential structures. Three basic possibilities are identified, which can lead to liminal consciousness: a focus on self-reference, a focus on external-reference, or a short-circuit of concentration by focusing on the occurrence of thoughts. Within this framework many forms of consciousness, e.g. those ‘invited’ by ecstatic or meditative practice, can be conceptualized, without relying on religious, reductionist or mystic terms. This paper recommends the use of the term ‘liminal consciousness’ over ‘altered states of consciousness’, to improve the connectivity of communication within the scientific system.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:00 - 16:30

16:00

3059 System Thinking for Global Political Citizenship Education
Humans are political animals but need to be better ones, because like all other animals, indeed all life forms, they are connected, through their various social systems of all types and at all levels, more closely than ever before with a planet’s subsystems increasingly interlocking in a global system. Their role as political animals is crucial because politics remains the authoritative distribution of values. In a global society lacking an equivalent world government, humans are everywhere performing political activities on different levels, from households to villages, from cities to provinces, from states to suprastate entities, from individual economic transactions to membership in organizations interacting with other organizations, that, in the context of globalization, cannot help affecting the lives of others around the world. Because all political decisions matter, it is necessary in constructing a global society as a system for humans to cultivate their political citizenships, and for others to help them understand what the needs of a sustainable future for the earth require them to take into consideration in their political choices from the perspective of system theory.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3140 Socio-Technical System Wholeness: A Theoretical Model Applied to Global Security Problems
Researchers and practitioners continue to study the causes of high-consequence events such as terrorist attacks or catastrophic failures of complex socio-technical systems. These studies have relevance to postulated and real events and are important, but limited. Analyses focusing on linear causal pathways are common in vulnerability and probabilistic risk analyses. These linear pathways typically focus on individual human error or technical system malfunctions. The linear approach is limited in its value as broader systemic issues can remain hidden.

A new model is proposed using an integral approach that describes vulnerability from a systemic wholeness perspective. Wholeness is a concept that has many meanings, from various academic and practical perspectives. This paper offers a new definition of the wholeness concept that draws from earlier ideas but is distinct in its application. The model can be used to focus attention on many integrated systemic domains simultaneously in a continuous and ongoing process. The model's foundation is a four-quadrant framework that describes subjective, objective, inter-objective, and inter-subjective domain spaces. Vulnerabilities or systemic deficiencies within these spaces are described using the metaphors of system holes and shadow aspects. Collection and depiction of these deficiencies allow for analysis, revealing common patterns of concern. Clarifying inter-organizational relationships is also important and highlights the need for clear systemic and sub-systemic boundary definitions.

Improvement of industrial, community, or infrastructure security requires a perpetual process that is described by a dynamic dimension to the wholeness model, drawing from methods employed in participatory action research. This paper presents the main points of the wholeness model, shows how deficiencies are analyzed, and provides examples of characteristic patterns of concern.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3032 Enlarging the System Boundary of Sustainability Assessment of Production and Consumption: A Global Intra-National Analysis
With a globalized economy, while consumption of products takes place in some parts of the world, manufacturing and consumption occur in different parts of the world. However, the scope of the traditional sustainability assessment studies is predominantly at product level and does not address macro-level impacts and cannot capture a majority of upstream supply chain impacts due to narrowly defined ‘System Boundaries’, which is also known as the cut-off criteria. To promote sustainable consumption and production policies and to understand the social, economic and environmental effects of consumption, there is a dire need to capture whole sustainability impacts across international supply chains using a systemic approach. The importance of consideration of all indirect supply chain-related impacts (is also called economy-wide macro-level analysis) within the sustainability science is emphasized in the past as inter-related global sustainability issues require more holistic approaches in which the macro-level impacts (economy-wide, or global) covering entire supply chain is essential to reveal sustainability impacts of products, services, or systems. This is because process-based models involve a limited number of processes without tracing the entire supply chains of products, and the inclusion or exclusion of processes is decided on the basis of subjective choices, which create the so-called system boundary problem. Past studies on the environmental footprint of sectors also showed that process-based models neglecting indirect regional and global supply chains suffer from significant truncation errors, which can be of the order of 50% or higher.

At this point, Multi Region Input–Output (MRIO) models can be a better modelling approach in the estimation of sustainability impacts of production and consumption at global scale. MRIOs can be a superior method for extending the scope from a regional economy to global economy. This research will discuss the importance of enlarging the system boundary in sustainability assessment of production and consumption from micro level to macro-level analysis. A web-based Global Carbon Footprint Accounting Tool (GCAT, http://s3-lab.sehir.edu.tr/gcat) will be introduced for presenting real case studies for sustainability analytics of manufacturing and service industries from world’s major economies. Finally, we discuss the importance of integrated system-based methods for advancement of sustainability assessment framework towards regional and global level analysis using multi-region input-output analysis that is capable of quantitatively capturing macro-level social, environmental, and economic impacts.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3001 Associative System to Predict Structures in the Ionosphere
Communications are the most important part of our daily life. The ionosphere play an important role in communications due to the conditions of the ionosphere can affect severely the transmitting and receiving information. Therefore, we propose an intelligent system that can predict accurately structures in the ionosphere. We use a morphological associative model. The obtained results of effectiveness from the Leave One out, Hold Out and Ten-Fold Cross validation test were: 89.45%, 97.77% and 95.83%, respectively, when we use only the max memory because min memory showed a bad performance.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:30 - 17:00

16:30

3066 What Drives the Systems? From Conatus to Dynamics: Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Kant
I will highlight the concepts of conatus and dynamics in Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Kant. These philosophers’ ideas are sometimes referred to as precursors of modern systems theories, or cybernetics.

First, I will analyse the idea of conatus in Hobbes’s theory, comparing it with those of Descartes and Spinoza. For Hobbes, conatus is motion through the length of a point and a small beginning, which causes interaction between matter. All natural and social systems then begin to move automatically. Conatus is thus just a trigger of motion.

After I discuss the transition from the notion of conatus to that of dynamics in Leibniz’s thought, I will illuminate Kant’s in both his pre-Critical and mature philosophical works. His idea is that the soul has a dynamical relation with the body, making it the prime power to move the body. Kant then examines the phenomena of the world from this viewpoint of dynamical interrelation. Thus, it lies behind the systems of recognition, which is formed simultaneously with the natural and social systems, according to Kant’s philosophy.

The interaction between elements in systems is essential to modern complex systems theory. I would like to say that these philosophers, especially Hobbes and Kant, are pioneers of complex systems theory.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:30 - 17:00

16:30

3108 University for Business and Technology Knowledge Center: Making Local Knowledge Visible
In setting the aspirational vision for University for Business and Technology, founder Dr. Edmond Harjrizi sought to educate Kosovo students to become active contributors to the society and at the workplace, within the country, the Baltic region, and beyond. For historical reasons, success initially depended on inviting lecturers and scholars from abroad, as reflected in the university’s brand statement, ‘American European Education’. Now, after more than a decade of successfully educating Kosovo graduates and developing Kosovo instructors, the University plans to further awareness and promote usage of university produced knowledge, within the institution and throughout the country, in a Knowledge Center.
This UBT Knowledge Center initiative extends the founding vision of national development through higher education. Reflective of its institutional maturity, the University now produces considerable local knowledge, including but not limited to faculty publications and presentations, student paper and reports, and commissioned studies and reports. In the first stage of this initiative to enhance visibility and accessibility of local knowledge, computer science students developed the code for a repository of UBT faculty publication and presentation references, which now serves as the platform for the Kosovo national faculty bibliography.
In this second phase of making local knowledge visible, the University will create a repository system and associated workflows for acquisition, organization, and dissemination of student research projects, faculty research papers, and community research reports. This initiative acknowledges a university’s responsibility to foster democratic civil society and regional economic growth, as well as further smart business practices and higher education efficiencies. Since local knowledge, identity, and learning are necessarily situated, Kosovo students, faculty, staff, and administrators serve as domain experts and international educators from Sweden and the United States serve as design facilitators.
After two years of planning activities, initiation of human-centered design for the UBT Knowledge Center commenced in April 2017 in a graduate level Information Systems Analysis, Design, and Modeling course at the Pristina campus. Soft systems design tools guided exploration of essential questions related to the why, what, and how of this national innovation generator. Since this initiative acknowledges the social context of learning – that knowledge is acquired and understood through action, interaction, and sharing with others, soft systems models and processes explored social relationships necessary for information exchange and knowledge creation enabled by technology.

In this paper, a pedagogical model is presented for initiating student learning about systems thinking ideas and tools, such as the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) Rich Picture and PQR technique. Student projects illustrate application of these tools to advance local knowledge visibility within prototype UBT Knowledge Center environments. Course evaluations reveal students’ success in advancing knowledge ecosystem design through soft systems. One student expressed this as now “my life will have two eras, before SSM and after SSM”.

Concluding reflections explore implications for the University’s knowledge vision, including consideration of interrelationships between university and society which develop new and more complex ways for working with people, information, and technology. This necessarily includes educating graduates to curate, interpret, and use information to create knowledge, which preserves intellectual, cultural, national, and regional resources for future generations.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3145 Analyzing Protracted Conflict Systems: A Comparative Study of State and Non-State Actors
This study applies the systems approach to the study of protracted conflicts (PCs). The goals of this study are to demonstrate the usefulness of a systemic view-point and to reveal differences in the interactions among state actors, and between state actors and Non-State Actors (NSAs). In other words, this study intends to investigate whether PCs involving NSAs have a different dynamic than those involving state actors alone. The importance of such an inquiry is that identifying differences in interaction patterns between the two kinds of PCs should assist decision-makers in forming suitable policies and in increasing control over events in world politics. For instance, if we could tell that NSAs are more prone than states to attack as a response to a demonstration of power, we would know that we must manage situations with NSAs differently than with states.

In order to broaden the field of PC research, this study sets forth a new conceptual framework that combines knowledge from various disciplines, including international relations, mathematics, physics and engineering. Contemporary research on PCs is largely influenced by 'political realism' which considers only states as main actors that determine the political events in the world system, while leaving the influence of other actors aside. The framework offered by this study is designed to supplement existing research on PCs by broadening it to include NSAs as active participants, enabling researchers to understand the role of both types of actors in PCs dynamic. Accordingly, it offers and applies new concepts that allow for the investigation of those interactions as processes of international systems that contain both states and NSAs as actors. In doing so, it highlights the interactions between states, and between states and NSAs, as chains of interrelated actions. A mathematical analysis of those interaction chains would uncover behavioral differences between state-only PCs and PCs with NSAs. The new concepts include 'Protracted Conflict System' (PCS), 'process bifurcations', 'process stability' and 'dangerousness'.

The study establishes a new dataset containing time-series of salient events from the Israel-Arab PC between 1947-1962, as reported by The New York Times. Each time-series is dyadic and contains actions played by both sides of the dyad. A dyad is the smallest international system, containing only two actors, and therefore is the simplest to describe and analyze. The analysis of dyadic systems allows for a more nuanced investigation that may teach the investigator specific details regarding the relationship between the two actors that would not have been found in systems with more actors, mainly because of the multiplicity of actions that may cancel one another out.

In addressing the differences between state-only PCs and ones with NSAs, the study hypothesizes that they occur in the following areas: 1. Interaction patterns, 2. Causality mechanisms, 3. Process stability levels, and 4. Dangerousness levels. Results have shown that regarding interaction patterns and causal mechanisms PCs with and without NSAs do indeed behave differently. However, regarding process stability and dangerousness, both types of PCs show much resemblance. This indicates that at the basic level of causes of processes, state-only PCs and PCs with NSAs have significant differences; however, at the level of the effects, they behave similarly. Further research should address other PCs and longer spans of time in order to validate these results. Even so, these preliminary results indicate that states and NSAs behave differently in the global political arena. Therefore, it is my hope that this study will aid decision makers in determining how to respond to different types of conflict, as well as motivate the application of the systems approach in uncovering more important traits of world politics.

Monday July 10, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3239 RISK Management in SMEs in Czech Republic
Intelligent tourism is difficult to define not only because there are different interpretations according to the researcher focus and the resources target but also because it is a newly topic with difficulty for its practical application. However, lately, some authors have been working on the generation of general elements that characterize this kind of tourism activity, such as the technological utilization, social benefits, sustainability relevance, and products design. This study constitutes a theoretical approach from the systems thinking to analyze the scope of the system of intelligent tourism in order to identify some of the elements and relations through the purpose of a holistic interpretation.

Monday July 10, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3002 Generic Early Warning Signals for Critical Transitions: An Assessment of the Signals' Utility as a Predictive Management Tool
Complex systems range from business entities to the climate. Complex systems have tipping points at which a small perturbation can trigger a critical transition leading to an emergence at an alternate stable state. Although there are differences in the nature of complex systems, their behaviors exhibit universal characteristics as they near tipping points. Among such characteristics are common generic early warning signals that precede critical transitions. The signals include: critical slowing down in which the rate of recovery from perturbations decreases over time; an increase in the variance of the state variable; an increase in the skewness of the state variable; an increase in the autocorrelations of the state variable; flickering between different states; and characteristic spatial patterns, such as an increase in spatial correlations over time. Presence of such signals has significant management implications, as the identification of the signals prior to the tipping point could allow management to identify intervention points. Despite the applications of the generic early warning signals in various fields, such as studies on fisheries, semiconductor research, and studies on epileptic seizures, a review of literature did not identify any applications in the area of managing student program withdrawal at the undergraduate level in distance universities, hence the research gap. This area could benefit from the application of generic early warning signals because the program withdrawal rate amongst distance university students is higher than the program withdrawal rate at face-to-face conventional universities. The program withdrawal problem presents an existential crisis for distance universities especially since, in some jurisdictions, public funding is dependent on the volume of students who persist and complete their courses. The proposed generic early warning signals for critical transition are not without controversy. Some researchers have argued that the identification of variables to which the generic signals were applied can only be accomplished post hoc, and that in some of the analyzed case studies the generic early warning signals remained absent despite the critical transitions. This is referred to as false negatives. Literature also suggests that the risk of false positives exists, where the signals are identified despite the absence of a critical transition. This research assessed the generic early warning signals through an intensive case study of undergraduate program student withdrawal at a Canadian distance university. The university is non-cohort based due to its system of continuous course enrolment where students can enrol in a course at the beginning of every month. The university’s student population therefore consists largely of adult learners given its convenient system of asynchronous distance learning which allows students to pursue individualized study. The assessment of the signals was achieved through the comparison of the incidences of generic early warning signals among students who withdrew or simply became inactive in their undergraduate program of study, the true positives, to the incidences of the generic early warning signals among graduates, the false positives. Research findings showed support for the signal pertaining to the rise in flickering which is represented in the increase in the student’s non-pass rates prior to withdrawing from a program; moderate support for the signals of critical slowing down as reflected in the increase in the time a student spends in a course; and moderate support for the signals on increase in autocorrelation and increase in variance in the grade variable. The findings did not support the signal on the increase in skewness of the grade variable. The assessment of the signals suggests that the signals, with the exception with the increase of skewness, could be utilized as a predictive management tool and potentially add one more tool in addressing the student program withdrawal problem.

Monday July 10, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3080 The Structure of Reality: An Emergent Hierarchy of Autonomous Levels?
This paper starts with a question: is the structure of reality a hierarchy of autonomous levels emerging from the increasing complexity of matter through evolution? I will critique this deeply held conviction in the field of systems thinking, and I will argue that a different world-image is possible. Indeed, I will suggest that my alternative world-image is a more accurate depiction of the structure of the universe. My argument will be unfolded in four parts. First, I will claim that the forerunners of the idea of emergent levels can be found in the British emergentist movement of the 1920s (Alexander 1920; Morgan 1923). Second, I will argue that the idea of hierarchical levels first enterer the biological world in the early 1930s (via the work of von Bertalanffy 1928 [1933]) and was later in the 1950s extended to the rest of the cosmos (Bertalanffy 1949 [1953]; Boulding 1956). Third, that the ideas of a ‘hierarchical order’ and ‘general systemology’ could have been suggested to Bertalanffy by Hartmann’s early “theory of categories” (1923, 1926). Fourth, I will introduce Hartmann’s “theory of fundamental categories” (1940), which is devoted to the structure of reality. Finally, in contrast to these ideas, I will argue for a structure of the universe that is not constituted by an emergent hierarchy of autonomous levels at all.

Monday July 10, 2017 17:00 - 17:30

17:00

3088 State Policies for the Technological Development of the Space System
The Technological Management (TM) is defined as: the decisions that the State adopts on the policies, plans programms, etc. relating to the creation, diffusion, use and transfer of space technology in order to achieve Technological Development (TD).

In Mexico the government, educational institutions and research centers have made efforts to found organisms, programms and projects, in order to foster space DT, which arise and disappear without achieving the objective for which they were founded.

The main purpose of the TM is the TD. To achieve this, integration is necessary concerning government-academia-industry in order to reduce political, economical and social conflicts.

For this reason, a Systemic Model (SM) for the Technological Development of the Mexican Space System (TDMSS) is proposed, allowing the integration of scientific research in companies based on market goals, strategies and objectives.

The MS has three stages: the first is the input (I), consisting of the analysis of the satellite system in the International and National context; The second, box (B), consisting of: diagnosis, proposal, planning to carry out the proposal;

The third relative to the output (O), in this case is the satellite TD. O = IB, ie, I and B can be adjusted to achieve O.

Monday July 10, 2017 17:00 - 17:30

17:00

17:30

3003 From Science to Systemic Solutions
Human imagination through mental processes of symbol manipulation in the mind produces a range of ideas for expression of thoughts in terms of a large variety of models for representations, communications, and prediction of events and states of parts of the empirical world such as the arts, entertainments, rules and regulations for coexistence in a society, explanatory hypotheses driven by curiosity such as the sciences and so on. This kind of thinking has been going on at all levels for facilitating survival, promoting development of human intellectual endeavours and trying to aid the construction of projects on a small, every day basis to large scale i.e. engineering driven by purposive activities of humans within social and technical scenarios.
This programme of work has been going on for millennia only the details changing, mostly through paradigm changes of concepts as the means for grasping parts of the world of interest. The last major change was the Renaissance, another is taking place now.
Pre Renaissance thinking, with the possible exception of Archimedes, had been by and large speculative along lines of philosophical contemplation, mysticism, superstition, religious beliefs etc. All kinds of thoughts had been acceptable until conventional science of physics entered the scene. Although conventional science had been propounding explanatory hypotheses of more or less generality, it only accepts those, particular instances of which can be verified by models resulting in falsification, or not, of the hypothesis itself. Mathematical models having been proved most suitable for this purpose.
Conventional science has been immensely successful in producing such hypotheses for the satisfaction of curiosity, discovering new materials and products, generating teaching schemes and affecting social changes. However, its theories are symmetrical in time, thus, it could just cope when faced with irreversibility, its invariants are restricted to qualitative and quantitative properties of a single, selected object involved in highly repeatable phenomenon, it operates in many domains and as such has failed engineering as a provider of knowledge base etc. A paradigm change beckons.
The question of problem solving in technical - social scenarios emerged in an organised manner for the first time during the 2nd WW when convoys of escorted ships crossed the Atlantic and moving enemy aircraft had to be shot down giving rise to operational research and control theory. The post WW period saw rapid, further development of interest in the ‘systemic or structural view’ evolving towards divers, speculative attempts with many ill defined models and approaches which currently still prevail.
This view rejected conventional science in its entirety branded as reductionist. The view of new science of systems retains science’s methodology of problem solving and its structure of ‘general principles plus models’ but with ‘systemic or structural content’ for modelling and designing structures with multiple agents in static and dynamic states which constitutes a paradigm change and supplements current thinking.
The advantages of this approach are:
Based on the universality of the structural/systemic view.
Availability of operational models directly applicable to analysis and design of scenarios.
Accommodation of conventional science of physics in systems science resulting in a possible, unified view of the scientific enterprise.
Being part of and aiding conventional and systems engineering.
Accommodating effects of emotions, will, prejudices, ambitions etc. on activities of human beings.
Construction of novel teaching schemes to suit problem solving.
Modification of views on parts of knowledge such as chemistry.
Rooted in existing knowledge.
Adding linguistics to supplement mathematics as a symbolism for modelling.
Supplements mode of thinking by professionals and others in society.

The presentation describes the scheme of human intellectual endeavour and the ‘new science of systems’ in problem solving supplying material for sorely needed debate.

Monday July 10, 2017 17:30 - 18:00

17:30

3046 Ethical Regulators and SuperEthical Systems
The Good Regulator Theorem proved that every effective regulator of a system must be a model of that system, and the Law of Requisite Variety dictates the range of responses that an effective regulator must be capable of. However, having an internal model and a sufficient range of responses is insufficient to ensure effective regulation, let alone ethical regulation. And whereas being effective does not require being optimal, being ethical is absolute with respect to a particular ethical schema.

This paper takes the Good Regulator Theorem, and unifies it with the Law of Requisite Variety and seven other requisites. The resulting Ethical Regulator Theorem has implications for designing and certifying explicitly ethical systems. It claims that the following nine requisites are necessary and sufficient for a cybernetic regulator to be effective and ethical:

Truth is not just about information that the regulator receives as inputs or treats as facts, but also the reliability of any interpretations of such information. If the regulator’s information sources or interpretations are unreliable, and cannot be error-corrected, then the integrity of the system is in danger. And if the perceptions of the regulator can be manipulated, it can be tricked into making decisions that are ineffective or unethical.

Variety in the range of possible actions must be as rich as the range of potential disturbances or situations. This is The Law of Requisite Variety.

Predictability requires a model that can be used to select the actions that will give the best outcome. This is the Good Regulator Theorem.

Purpose is expressed as unambiguously prioritized goals.

Ethics are expressed as unambiguously prioritized values that have a higher priority than the goals for purpose. By always obeying the relevant highest priority ethical imperatives, the regulator is guaranteed to act ethically within the scope of the ethical schema. Because ethical schemas vary between legislative jurisdictions, they are handled as plug-ins.

Intelligence must be applied to the previous five requisite types of information to select the most rational and effective ethical action from the set of possible actions.

Influence is the existence of pathways to transmit the effects of the selected actions to the regulated system. This is not a property of the regulator itself, but a function of the connectivity relationships that span from the regulator’s outputs to elements of the regulated system and its environment.

Integrity of the regulator and all its subsystems must be assured. Monitoring mechanisms must identify if an ethical imperative is violated and, if necessary, automatically notify the appropriate authorities, preserve evidence, and activate an ethical fail-safe mode.

Transparency is defined by the Law of Ethical Transparency, which states “For a system to be truly ethical, it must be possible to prove retrospectively that it acted ethically with respect to the appropriate ethical schema.”

Integrity and Transparency are codependent because we require integrity of transparency, and transparency of integrity.

Because this theorem is independent of the ethics schema that is used, it provides a basis for systematically evaluating the adequacy of existing or proposed designs for systems that make decisions that can have ethical consequences; regardless of whether the systems are human, machines, or cyberanthropic hybrids.

In addition, a new framework is proposed for classifying cybernetic systems, which highlights the existence of a possibility-space bifurcation in our future time-line, and the implementation of “super-ethical” systems is identified as an urgent moral imperative for the human race to avoid a technological dystopia. Concrete actions are proposed to steer our future towards a cyberanthropic utopia.

Monday July 10, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3194 Resilience Management: from Fukushima Disaster to Boiling Oceans and Viral Spread
We reviews the necessity of ‘resilience based on disaster management’ (Chroust, G., 2015). Firstly, it examines non-resilience, showing the current status of nuclear fuel debris, contaminated water and radioactive waste after the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, since when radioactive contamination has damaged the local community and socio-economic systems. Secondly, it presents evidence of global spread of super-typhoons and unusual weather patterns, with the location of maximum typhoon intensity having moved northward by approximately 150-200 km compared to 1982, and at the same time expanded due to the ‘boiling ocean’ effect. Thirdly: it considers ir-resilience, ‘global ocean warming’ through the multiplier effects of hydrospheric and CO2 atmospheric warming. Finally: it discusses un-resilience, arising from the spread of infectious tropical diseases to the northern hemisphere caused by global ocean warming, as part of the irreversible environmental change caused by our artificial systems, which will increase the risk and crisis of disasters for all human beings. Re-consideration of our living systems is therefore necessary to create awareness of the ‘five functions of resilience management’ for all-round sustainability.

Monday July 10, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3206 VR On-Site
Effective training is a cornerstone of disaster preparedness. Quality, consistency and frequency of training are shown to impact self-perceived disaster readiness of first responder units. However, barriers such as time, cost and safety limit the extent to which large groups of responders can be brought up to established standards, particularly related to integrated disaster team response skills and experience. This is particularly evident during events involving large-scale mobilization of population-based healthcare and public health resources where skills learned through training impact directly the actual response. Although large-scale events like the 2011 earthquake in Japan or the 2001 attacks in New York City have highlighted the need for additional emphasis on disaster response training and exercises, preparedness efforts have continued to focus primarily on three conventional training methods: 1) didactic, classroom-based teaching; 2) web-based training that consists primarily of pre-recorded, user-paced presentation material; and 3) reallife drills and tabletop exercises. While all of the above are long-established valid approaches, classroombased teaching and web-based presentations lack the realism offered by real-life drills. On the other hand, real-life drills are often inconsistent because of an inability to vary levels of stressful events and the extent of time and resources required to design, execute and review such drills. The advent of technologicallybased approaches through virtual reality (VR) environments holds significant promise in its ability to bridge the gaps of other established training formats. VR-based systems encompass a wide array of technical capabilities ranging from non-immersive computer-based setups to fully immersive and highfidelity platforms where participants wear head mounted displays (HMD) for 3D scene viewing and use 3D input devices (joystick, gamepad) for interaction in controlled environments.

Monday July 10, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

18:00

18:30

 
Tuesday, July 11
 

07:15

#ISSS2017 Vienna Roundtable
Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below) | | Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science... Read More →

Tuesday July 11, 2017 07:15 - 08:30
Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Sciences Paulanergasse 13, 1040 Wien, Austria

08:00

Morning Registration Desk Open
Foyer

Tuesday July 11, 2017 08:00 - 13:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

08:45

Day 2 Introduction: From Money to Value Creation to Reinventing Economy in the Energy Transition
Economy Day

Our re-regionalized and globalized economies are in need of innovative alternative economic models (e.g. socioecological models, economies for the common good). The conference will bridge advances in macro-economics from an academic perspective, like outlooks into new value assessments beyond the GDP with Thermodynamics- and Evolutionary Economics, and current advances of Impact Investments for conscious business practices. Business and industry leaders will meet political decision makers and start a conversation underpinned with the latest insights gathered by systems scientists and practitioners.

The conference will additionally highlight successful practice in the areas of Bioeconomies, Circular Economies (e.g. Cradle to Cradle) and large scale resilient and resource-efficient supply chains / value networks, innovative energy productions and advances in renewable energy resources from a scientific as well as applied perspective, in industrialized and developing countries to address the need for the energy transition.


Tuesday July 11, 2017 08:45 - 09:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:00

Keynote Science: "Social Value and Money" - Professor Dr. Hardy Hanappi
Speakers
avatar for Univ.Prof. Mag. Dr. Hardy Hanappi

Univ.Prof. Mag. Dr. Hardy Hanappi

Institute for Mathematical Methods in Economics, TU Wien
Professor, Ad Personam Jean Monnet Chair for Political Economy of European Integration, Insitute for Mathematical Methods in Economics, University of Technology Vienna


Tuesday July 11, 2017 09:00 - 09:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:30

Keynote Practice: Dr. Charly Kleissner
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Charly Kleissner

Dr. Charly Kleissner

Co-Founder, KL Felicitas Foundation, Toniic
Dr. Charly Kleissner is an impact investor. He believes that the fundamental and deeper meaning of wealth is to make a positive contribution to humanity and the planet. He insists that the best impact investments integrate financial return and social/environmental impact. And he argues... Read More →


Tuesday July 11, 2017 09:30 - 10:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:00

Keynote Science: Prof. Dr. Andre Martinuzzi
Speakers
avatar for Prof. Dr. André Martinuzzi

Prof. Dr. André Martinuzzi

Head of Institute, Vienna University, Institute for Managing Sustainability
Evaluation, CSR, Sustainable Development, Knowledge Brokerage Sustainable development is an important challenge for our time - one which we at the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration wish to thoroughly analyse. Here, the topic is addressed from a variety of... Read More →


Tuesday July 11, 2017 10:00 - 10:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:30

Keynote: Q&A
Tuesday July 11, 2017 10:30 - 10:45
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:45

Break / Networking
Tuesday July 11, 2017 10:45 - 11:15
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:15

Keynote Practice: Dr. Olaf Brugman - '3136 Sustainable Development in Business Networks - The Ecology of Dialogue and Narratives in Management'
Sustainable Development in Business Networks - The Ecology of Dialogue and Narratives in Management (PLENARY)

The presentation shows how dialogue and narratives are drivers for sustainable business development in and by organisational networks. Sustainable development and inclusive business are required for business to maintain its social license to operate, both in a physical and in a social sense. Developing business in a sustainable way regards challenges and solutions that go beyond the sphere of control of individual businesses.

Effective stakeholder dialogue development builds narratives that influence and enable actors. They are essential both as a business intelligence tools to develop the business in its identity, strategy and operations, and also to design and realise physical, economic and social environments in which business can thrive in a legitimate and inclusive way.This is demonstrated by practical examples in the areas of green finance, sustainable agriculture and in a policy dialogue between government, business and civil society on good land governance in the Netherlands.

System dynamics models on learning, development, intercommunity relationship dynamics, ecology, mind (Gregory and Marie Catherine Bateson) and management cybernetics (Stafford Beer, Raul Espejo, Fredmund Malik, Markus Schwaninger) are used to discuss the role of dialogue and narratives in non-hierarchical organisational networks. Also, a case study on sustainable soy supply chains will be presented on how management cybernetics’ concepts and tools were used to stimulate dialogue and to use its fruits to design better sustainable business systems, using Malik Super Syntegration technology.The presentation draws conclusions on what system science can contribute to designing effective dialogues for collaborative change in organisational networks. And it suggests how experiences from business practice may inspire further dialogue and narrative-centered development of viable systems science and management cybernetics.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Olaf Brugman

Dr. Olaf Brugman

Head of Sustainable Markets, Rabobank
Olaf Brugman is an executive director and Head of Sustainable Markets, , and responsible for green and social capital market finance. He also represents Rabobank in the executive committee of the Green Bond Principles, one of the leading standards for sustainable capital market finance... Read More →


Tuesday July 11, 2017 11:15 - 11:45
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:45

Economy Panel Session: DDr. Christoph Thun-Hohenstein, DI Dr. Roland Kuras, Ladeja Godina Kosir, Josephine von Mitschke

The contribution of DDr. Thun-Hohenstein: The Commons: Inspiring the For-Profit-Paradigm in Digital Modernity

Speakers
avatar for DI Dr. Roland Kuras

DI Dr. Roland Kuras

Power Solution
avatar for Josephine von Mitschke-Collande

Josephine von Mitschke-Collande

Programme Manager, Innaxis Research Institute
Innaxis Research Institute (INX, www.innaxis.org) is a private and independent research institution addressing complex scientific challenges of significant social and economic impact. | | Innaxis'​ agenda covers different sectors: aviation, transport, ICT, life sciences, environment... Read More →
avatar for Ladeja Godina Košir, MSc

Ladeja Godina Košir, MSc

Co-founder and managing director of Giacomelli Media, Circular Change Slovenia
MSc Ladeja Godina Košir, co-founder and managing director of Giacomelli Media, is a connector and marketing-communications professional with more than 20 years’ experience in the Adriatic region. Focusing on economic and societal transformation, she co-creates with different stakeholders... Read More →
avatar for DDr. Christoph Thun-Hohenstein

DDr. Christoph Thun-Hohenstein

General Director, Museum für angewandte Kunst (MAK)
Christoph Paul Norbert came from the Thun-Hohenstein-Sardagna line and graduated from the Vienna Academic High School in 1978 and promoted Dr. iur. (Rechtswissenschaftschaft) and 1983 as Dr. phil. (Political Science and Art History) at the University of Vienna. | Between 1984 and... Read More →


Tuesday July 11, 2017 11:45 - 12:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

12:30

13:00

13:00

Lunch
Tuesday July 11, 2017 13:00 - 14:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3112 Towards the Definition of a Dynamic/Systemic Assessment for Cyber Security Risks through a Systems Thinking Approach

Armenia, Stefano; Ferreira Franco, Eduardo; Nonino, Fabio; Spagnol,i Emanuele

Stefano Armenia, Università degli Studi di Roma “La Sapienza”
armenia@dis.uniroma1.it

Eduardo Ferreira Franco, Escola Politécnica of University of São Paulo
eduardo.franco@usp.br


Fabio Nonino, Università degli Studi di Roma “La Sapienza”
fabio.nonino@uniroma1.it

Emanuele Spagnoli, PricewaterhouseCoopers
ema.spagno@gmail.com

Nowadays our society is increasingly becoming economic and social dependent on the cyberspace, which includes physical network assets and software based systems. However, the cyberspace is exposed to numerous risks, and there is a constant threat of exploitable vulnerabilities, which could cause significant reputational and economic damages to the companies. For addressing these increasing threats, the Italian National Cyber Security Framework was developed to offer a uniform approach to assessing cyber risks into organizations, as well as to help improve the related security through focused investments. Still, this evaluation is not a straightforward endeavor. Using the principles of the Systems Thinking paradigm, this work presents a way to put into causal relationship the self-assessment risk-categories of the framework by associating them to the various aspects of reference inside a theoretical organizational structure (composed of business areas, process, functions, and roles), hence deriving a systemic causal-effect relationship map capable of evidencing, at least qualitatively for this study, how a change in one or more categories is driving changes also into other ones.

Keywords: National Cyber Security Framework; Cyber-security Risks; System thinking.


Presenters/Facilitators
SA

Stefano Armenia

Università degli Studi di Roma “La Sapienza”
avatar for Emanuele Spagnoli

Emanuele Spagnoli

Associate - Cybersecurity, PricewaterhouseCoopers


Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3109 Systemic Innovation in a World of Uncertainty
Systemic Innovation is a field of praxis that is rapidly taking shape as a key driver in R&D initiatives focused on integral sustainability the world over. This field curates the exploration of socio-technical systems design, implementation and insertion in society in ways that foster planetary thrivability at local and global (aka ‘glocal’) levels. To do so, it adopts a transformative approach to characteristically “wicked” societal problems through the transdisciplinary study of ways in which pragmatic socio-technical systems innovation can dissolve VUCA challenges (i.e., those that are characteristically volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous). This paper explores how insights from the systems sciences can directly influence real-world socio-technical systems change. By considering both the systemic leverage points and systemic nurturance spaces that foster the emergence of innovations for thrivability, the field of systemic innovation is developing new methods, models and means of emerging ecosystems of R&D+i (research and development plus innovation). Results include the generation of socio-technical solutions that are synergetic with each other (thereby forming collective incubators or innovation greenhouses based on the application of collective intelligence). The emergence of such innovation ecosystems requires leadership and systemic innovation that incorporates social values, technological creativity, economic opportunity and environmental integrity. This paper considers themes of innovation, leadership, connective intelligence, collective intelligence, collective creativity, design thinking, systems practice, entrepreneurial experimentation and other considerations related to the emerging field of leadership and systemic innovation.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3152 A Public Database for Systems Processes Theory and Systems Pathology (DB-SP2T)
Systems Processes Theory (SPT) teams, following 40 years of collection by its originator Dr. Len Troncale, are continuing to collect numerous case studies, scientific research articles, books, references, definitions and other related material on phenomena across the major domains of science (astronomy, physics, chemistry, geology, biology, mathematics, computer science, human & social systems). Some 55 Isomorphic Systems Processes or Patterns (ISPs) as GST components organize these collections because the peer-reviewed scientific method gives evidence for their underlying commonality, similarity or universality despite specific differences in scale, discipline, or type of system involved. For example, SPT has a collection for the cycles ISP of about 100 case studies of cycling features/functions from the literature of the above 9 disciplines. Same for hierarchies, or networks. The "Origins patterns" has over 1,000 research articles collected as one ISP. Plans are to collect items for 30 Categories of Information (InfoCategories) for each and every ISP. Access to this valuable, transdisciplinary, general systems oriented body of knowledge is currently very limited. Several wish to secure this huge knowledge base in perpetuity for use by a wider range of systems scientists, systems thinkers, sustainability experts, systems engineers, design & management specialists, etc.

The authors are working with Dr. Troncale to develop a publicly accessible database of the information. This development would make the work of the many usable by anyone. This presentation and paper describes initial planning. We recognize two major parts of this project: 1) the database schema & software, and 2) the human interface to the data. The development of the schema is complicated by the wide diversity of material in the collection. Metadata surrounding each item lacks uniformity. For example, the bibliographic citations exist in a multitude of formats (ALA, Chicago, Dewey Decimal, IEEE reference numbers, URL, LOC, Marc 25 and so on.) The first step in developing the schema is collecting, rationalizing and building a common citation construct with enough flexibility to adjust to future requirements without introducing redundancy. The development of the interface must anticipate the questions a user might ask. Since the users of the database will range from experienced science researchers to students to engineers to curators and more - most likely there will be multiple access modes needed.

This paper and presentation also discusses the progress so far and outlines the next steps for other key design challenges such as: (1) enabling crowd sourcing and collaboratories; (2) identifying meaningful relationships among seemingly unrelated data elements; and (3) providing structured and unstructured information access for diverse users. The earliest paper (1978) in the SPT series described the ideal of a virtual network graphic of great complexity that would be instantaneously updated with any new entry to the DB-SP2T, and enable real-time travel thru the graphic by the user for choice of any specific part of the net graphic. Organization of the net would be with ISPs as nodes and Linkage Propositions (LPs) between nodes. The incredible detail in the DB-SP2T is evidenced by considering a matrix of ISPs by ISPs that records the number of current LPs with over 3000 interstices, each containing critical information. Or by considering a matrix of ISPs by InfoCategories, where just one of the 3,300 interstices usually has a dozen items of information, resulting in a matrix possibly totaling nearly 40,000 entries. Examples of such matrices will be presented and their inclusion in the DB-SP2T critiqued.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:00 - 14:30

14:00

3216 Competencies in Systems Work
This workshop, hosted by IFSR (international Federation for Systems Research), will explore commonalities and differences of approach to professionalization of ‘the Systems person’ and thus where the identification of systems competencies are needed. Discussions will include how we can establish international foundations on which to continue to build professionalization efforts. As organizations consider the inclusion of systems approaches and perspectives into their work, there is a need to identify the types of skills and knowledge which systems professionals possess. In recent conversations the terms systemic sensibility, systems literacy and systems thinking in practice capability have been used by some. A number of related high-profile projects have been, and are currently, underway, which include:

1. Efforts by INCOSE, with ISSS members, to include systems principles in the Systems Engineering Book of Knowledge (SEBoK)

2. Preparation of competency frameworks for the systems engineer by INCOSE as well as INCOSE (UK)

3. Development of a competency framework to assist with mentoring its members by SCiO (Systems & Cybernetics in Organisations)

4. UK initiative to create a Level 7 (Master’s Degree) apprenticeship, in Systems Engineering in which Systems Thinking is a key component of the standard; this is related initially to the defense industry – but will be more broadly based in future

5. An initiative championed by the Open University (UK) to create a trailblazer employer committee to formulate a level 7 apprenticeship standard relating to the Systems Thinking Practitioner

6. Action research led by systems academics at the Open University with national and international stakeholders to create a competency framework for the Systems thinking in Practice (STiP) professional;

7. An OECD initiative related to public sector innovation and the need for Systems Thinking 8. Multiple efforts to secure funding through the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health, in the US

These, of course, are in addition to the many, many projects undertaken by individual practitioners and consultants in organizations, institutions, and communities around the world.

This workshop, hosted by IFSR, will provide a time for very brief presentations of examples where the identification of systems competencies are needed. It will primarily focus on discussions about ways in which we can establish international foundations on which to continue to build. We invite you to join us at ISSS2017 in Vienna.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:00 - 15:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

14:00

14:00

WORKSHOP: 'Business Navigation' - Louis Klein
SIG/EG Chairs
avatar for Dr. Louis Klein

Dr. Louis Klein

Dean, European School of Governance
SIG Chair: Organisational Transformation and Social Change (OTSC)There are two main research directions and one exploratory group in OTSC this year in Vienna. The two guiding topics are digital transformation and post-truth society. What can a systems perspective add to these two... Read More →

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:00 - 17:30

14:00

WORKSHOP: 'Ecosystem Governance / VSM' - Christiane Gebhardt & Allenna Leonard
Case Brainport Smart District
1. Intro Ecosystem / Regional innovation
2. Intro VSM Tool
3. Group work VSM Elements / functions
Break
4. Case: Solution BSD Governance
5. Discussion:
a. Implementation
b. Research gaps
c. Hands on tips & tricks

Chairs
avatar for Mrs. Christiane Gebhardt

Mrs. Christiane Gebhardt

Sr. Project Manager, Malik Institute
Entrepreneurial and innovative senior operational, change and project management leader with over 20 years of global experience that includes successfully delivering high profile projects in national champion industries and the government sector. | | Expert German Innovation Policies... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Allenna Leonard

Dr. Allenna Leonard

Principal, Complementary Set, Cwarel Isaf Institute
Allenna Leonard is an independent consultant in Toronto who worked with Stafford Beer from the early eighties to his death in 2002. She works with non-profit and business organizations applying cybernetic approaches and models, primarily although not wholly those of Stafford Beer... Read More →

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:00 - 17:30

14:00

Afternoon Registration Desk Open
Foyer, Campus Gusshaus

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:00 - 17:30
Foyer G

14:30

3178 Context Adaptive Modeling Tool in Service Design
Nowadays, analysts and business researchers are modeling a huge number of services. To develop a service accomplishing a simple requirement is quite easy to fulfill and any currently used modeling tool seems to be fully sufficient for the purpose. But is it really true? Are we sure that we can cover (with some level of abstraction) all processes and relationships hidden in the service provision by current modeling tool? We want to elaborate on these questions further.

The situations and services we are currently trying to model become more and more complex. Complexity itself is just one part of the issue. The other one is that the services should work in different contexts. A high number of analysts create simply as many models how many contexts they are able to recognize. Thence, the question is: Are we able to mention the role of the particular service in different contexts using current modeling tools?

Let's take a simple example of a street lighting. There is a try of cities to save money by upgrading street lamps into adjustable LED equipped lamps. The idea is to dim a light when there is no pedestrian nor a driving car on the street. For this purpose, LED lamps need to be equipped with a camera that signals the LED to increase luminosity when a pedestrian or a car is identified. Moreover, once the camera is equipped, it can be used to identify free parking slots on the street, or even to help ensure public safety (passively - by identifying moving people, lighting the street more when needed/actively - by informing a police about suspicious situations).

As it can be seen, there is at first a context of an adjustable lighting to save money. Then we used same devices to identify free parking slots and lastly to ensure a public safety. Whence, we used the same devices and similar data in different contexts to create different services.

If there is an error in some service, it can influence the other services. The problem can be a dysfunction of some cameras or the recognition software resolving in bad illumination of the street, not correct recognition of free parking slots, with no active public safety. If there is just one service deployed at the beginning and the other is added later, it can influence a traffic on the network the data are going through and slow down both service or lower a service reliability.

Therefore, for context modeling, we need to use (or develop) a tool that is not only context adaptive but also accepts the context as a part of the model itself. This tool should have following features:
Enable to decompose any situation into a set of elements
Build any related model by a specific use of those elements in any context
Recognize the differences among the contexts and describe them

Use of such modeling tool for an analysis of a complex service should bring better value for all the service participants. Nevertheless, according to the last service research, services are not only more and more complex, they become more adaptive at the same time. Therefore, we need to develop a modeling tool that will be also adaptive, meaning that it can adapt the model according to the actual context without losing any knowledge, information or relationships from previous contexts. In this paper, we propose such a tool for adaptive context service modeling.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3141 Using Monterey Phoenix to Model Each Isomorphic Systems Process (ISP) of the Systems Processes Theory (SPT): Test of Concept
This paper describes preliminary research in formalizing Isomorphic Systems Processes, Patterns or Pathologies (ISPs) using automated systems engineering tools, based on systems science research. Monterey Phoenix (MP) is a behavior modeling approach and tool used by systems engineers to describe system behaviors and expose emergent behaviors in engineered, complex systems. MP is introduced in the context of its potential for modeling ISPs both abstractly (at the universal patterns level) and concretely (at the example, case study, or instantiation level). In this paper, the Cycles ISP is modeled in MP and executed to compute many possible variations for the Cycles ISP. Input for the model of Cycles ISP comes from the accumulating SPT relational data base of 30 categories of information for each ISP briefly described in the paper. Selection of key information from just four of the categories were used to model the Cycles ISP in Monterey Phoenix, namely, “Identifying Features,” “Measurables,” “Identifying Functions,” and “How a Process.” Inspection of the output from this executable model provides insight to inform the proposed ISP taxonomy. In particular, MP-generated variants of the Cycles ISP are shown to contain patterns of positive feedback, negative feedback, oscillation, lifecycle, and recycling. Although, the input relational data base contained preliminary information on three of these (oscillations, lifecycles, and recycling), the other two were not anticipated in pre-model analyses. Applications of the Cycles ISP are included to demonstrate example instances of where these patterns occur and which deviations from the standard universal patterns might result in system dysfunctions or pathologies. The paper suggests how knowledge of these deviations might contribute to knowledge of why they occur at the fundamental general systems level, what exact impacts they have, and how they might be corrected. The initial results show that MP is a productive framework for describing an ISP as a formal and executable model, in terms of a simple and straightforward event grammar. Future work includes expanding the overall SPT-MP meta-model with other proposed ISPs (there are at least 55 additional ISPs available), creating more exploratory executions of the meta-model, and cataloging the formal MP models of ISPs. The ultimate goal would be to interconnect a sufficient number of the ISPs to yield a very general model of sustainable systems dynamics at all scales and for many types or classes of systems as well as models of dysfunction that are often encountered in engineering and natural systems.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:30 - 15:00

14:30

3169 A Learning Community to Foster an “Economía Amable”
The search for sustaining abundance and genuine happiness is a human aspiration since immemorial times. Nowadays in a scenario of increasing complexity with unforeseen challenges linked to systemic fragility we continue this quest and must undergo a profound cultural transformation to shape desirable futures.

By enhancing the awareness and comprehension of the interconnected nature of our world, and developing the capacity to execute meaningful choices that (truly) recognize our interdependency within the web of life is a key to live joyfully in a sustainable and nurturing society, both locally and planetary. A society to which corresponds an “Economía Amable”: an economy kind to people and to nature.

Note that the Spanish word “amable” comes from the Latin amabilitas, which in short means conducive to love. In our view it means “love in action”, a genuine kindness that comes from nurturing multidimensional generosity and carefulness in every field of human action. Feminine values, since long diminished by the patriarchal culture, are core to bring forth capabilities and conditions for the emergence of an “Economía Amable”.

A way to create a new system, out of an existing one, is envision a new desirable one, and then find out what resources to rely on to advance —recreating past, present and future— in a co-evolutionary process. We propose action-research practices to promote coevolutionary change towards a culture that expresses kind feminine values, an economy of abundance.

We created a work of artscience as a tool to contribute to that endeavor. The World of Navis Utopia depicts a world in which the currently most delicate challenges humanity faces doesn’t exist anymore. It is a travelling exhibition to easily find its way into the imaginations and lives of all those yearning to make the world a better place. It shows that the seeds of a desirable scenario already exist in our planetary community, as well as the knowledge and methodologies to successfully overcome the challenges our specie undergoes at the time being.

We started an autoecolearning community with the aim to learn together, redefining and opening up to unforeseen possibilities. We intend to promote its development offering encounters and workshops in which to address significant issues, using variations of the Bela Banathy Conversation Model and exhibits of the World of Navis Utopia. In these learning events we foster personal, organizational and social learning, addressing the main concerns of the community, including keys to develop a systems perspective, cyclical consciousness and multidimensional amabilitas. Envisioning, looking beyond the constraints of present circumstances and tendencies is a first attempt to bring in a rich innovative learning process in which to share ideas, experiences and concepts, cultivating systemic leverage, designing a desirable future, changing the ways we perform our daily activities: creating a better world for everyone by becoming the systems be wish to see in the world.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:00

3044 Social Responsibility and Ethical Issues about Smart Technology Usage
The new forms of smart and artificial intelligent technologies present a great risk to the society (political – ethical challenge). For this reason, the ability of the society's decision makers to prepare an appropriate ethical response is needed.

The paper is focused on the outline the main social, economic, and ethical issues, raised by the faster development of the smart and artificial intelligent products or services in everyday life processes. Smart technologies can today explore their environment, communicate with each other or with humans and help their users. The development and implementation of the smart technologies in the human environment is and it will be influenced by social and economic changes and opening new social and ethical problems in the near future, because smart technologies are now: (i) invading into the sensitive human areas and allow others to come easier for sensible private information in real time; (ii) causing job losses; (iii) replacing humans for tasks such as driving and more demanding (e.g. management of the industrial processes).

The paper presents the issues of technology and human sciences. It is going for a complex subject which is quite often misrepresented, some of the fundamental concepts relating ethics in science and technology are recalled and clarified.

At the conclusion of the paper social responsible model for implementation of the smart technology in human environment will be presented. The purpose of the model is to provide ethical and social norms and thus protect human before the socioeconomic changes caused with the high penetration of smart technologies in human everyday life.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:00

3060 Taoism: Science-Based Concepts om a More Sustainable Global EcoSystem
Increasing wealth disparity, polarization of discourses, move into the Anthropocene epoch, people’s migration, terrorism…are all pieces of evidence that our worldview ought to evolve quickly if we want our eco-system, our humanity to survive and to keep claiming we are the smartest species on earth.

The elements of ancient Chinese wisdom like wu-wei, the power of de, and practicing meditation, echo many of the principles which have emerged in recent years, such as spiritual leadership, and are also expressed in organizational models such as Holocracy, Sociocracy, or Teal, and in economic concepts, such as enlightened capitalism, all seeking at making our world more sustainable. So, what can we learn from the school of thoughts of the Warring State period, 2,500 years old, and can this help us address the wicked problems we are facing both in the West and the East?

In this article I will look specifically at Taoism through the lens of Clare Graves’s human development model. Graves defined eight levels of human consciousness, six defined as needs-based systems and two as being systems. According to Graves’s research, only when thinking at the latter two levels can we develop sustainable systems. When analyzing some key Taoists concepts through that lens, looking also through Ken Wilber’s trans fallacy concept, it is hard not to conclude that the Taoist philosophy operates at Tier 2 level and offers many keys to develop a more functional eco-system.

Yet, are these Taoists assumptions and concepts plausible and viable in today’s world? Can they really support the development of a more sustainable society? To answer these questions I will look at the latest research in neuroscience and social science. Focusing on Taoism, I will look at three principles.

First, the cycle of reversion, that is nothing should be taken to extremes or it will turn back to its original state, causing the opposite effect, a concept illustrated by the design of the Yin and Yang symbol. I will explore this principle through the work of Wegner on the ironic effect of conscious efforts and of Frankl on paradoxical intention therapy. Both showed that conscious pursuit of a goal often leads to missing that goal and it is what the Daodejing refers to as the quests of opposites. In any dyad, Laozi wants one to pursue the part one does not want: choose weakness rather than strength, darkness over brightness.

I will then look at the research on downregulation of the prefrontal cortex to explore the validity of the state of wu-wei. The state that Laozi wants one to enter into is similar to what cognitive neuroscientist Arne Dietrich referred to as transient hypofrontality, that is, the downregulation of our prefrontal cortex. His work on the physiology of athletes being in the zone, that is, in wu-wei, showed that due to the intensity of the exercise the prefrontal cortex is literally shut down for a while, giving a sense of peacefulness, of living in the present, of flow, of oneness with nature and the universe. Reaching this state allows one to be more authentic, spontaneous.

Last, I will look at the notion of categorical rigidity. Zhuangzi was very concerned by the risk presented by language. This categorical inflexibility hinders what is often referred to as divergent creativity. This human limitation has now been proven scientifically, for instance, by the work of Guilford on the development of unusual alternative task.

I will conclude that Ancient Chinese wisdom, Taoism in particular, provides very valuable elements to help humanity develop a more sustainable world.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:00

3154 Systems Processes Theory (SPT) as General Systems Theory (GST)
This paper suggests that two reasons for the lack of progress toward a widely recognized consensus on a candidate general theory of systems (GST as GTS) are: (1) there does not exist a consensus set of criteria with which to judge alternative candidates (so they just continue to proliferate without any unification); and (2) there is little or no tradition of judgement or selective force in the ISSS eliminating alternatives or forcing them to integrate. In this presentation and paper, a list of 15 criteria or features that we propose MUST be present in any candidate GTS are submitted, described and critiqued. One major criterium is that any candidate GTS must cite or utilize multiple (as in many) isomorphies as hypothesized by the Founders of GST in the beginning. The author knows of several authors of alternative systems theories who dispute this claim and so arguments for and against are presented and refuted. Then the list of criteria for a GST are compared with a list of twenty Tenets (or features) of the Systems Processes Theory (SPT). Each tenet is explained in terms of the criteria needed for a GST. Then a listing of a dozen other candidate systems theories are listed, examined, and discussed. Some of these theories of system dynamics are adequate for the purposes or functions for which they were designed, but this presentation will show that they are not within the realm of the science of systems intended by the ISSS Founders or are not, in fact, general. SPT will be shown to be strictly a science of systems as opposed to attempts at systems thinking for purely human design objectives. SPT will also be shown to be general in the widest definition of that term. Then the SPT will be compared with newer descriptions of features needed for a GST emerging from the work of Rousseau and Wilby et. al. and the BCSSS (Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science). Several continuing obstacles that inhibit formation of a consensus on a unified GST will also be considered and their history discussed as well as the current fate and/or status of the SPT.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 15:00 - 15:30

15:30

Break / Networking
Tuesday July 11, 2017 15:30 - 16:00

16:00

3163 Systems Biology as Systems Pathology
This presentation and paper will explore the similarities between the established discipline of Systems Biology and the new suggested discipline of top-down Systems Pathology. It will show that both investigate complex systems, and both are necessarily interdisciplinary. Both recognize some of the same isomorphies (especially self-organization, feedbacks, and networks -- though Systems Biology is less consciously aware of them as isomorphies). Both look for the primary or fundamental causes of dysfunctions (one at the reductionist level; the other at the systems dynamics level). Whereas there are similarities, there are also differences that will be discussed. While systems biology is reductionist dominated, most often elucidating molecular machine and organellar level foci, even these levels may be considered as examples of total systems dynamics such that even systems biology may be considered systems pathology oriented and not just conventional reductionist science. Systems Biology is unaware of this perspective.

The talk and paper will begin with citation of evidence for the rapid recent expansion of the new field of systems biology measurable in terms of funding, institutions, job descriptions, major centers, and initiation of new education and academic programs. Systems Biology will be characterized as very successful and here to stay. The paper will continue with an explication of how useful investigation of dysfunctions have been in getting a start on understanding of complex systems in biology (with examples from the studies of enzymopathies, knock-out genes, and errors in development and how each gave us a handle to pursue to understand better otherwise impenetrable complex physiology). We will suggest that as Systems Biology has amply demonstrated, this is a fruitful strategy for Systems Pathology and even all of GST to pursue in researching complex systems.

The talk will continue with examples of the utility of the systems biology approach to research on key and important total system diseases (thus systems pathologies) as represented in the author’s course lectures on the Systems Biology of Cancer (Bio 302) and the Systems Biology of Aging. (Bio 328). But beyond providing a better understanding of disease states such as those, the systems approach is also useful in understanding the structure and limits-on-structure of all systems at all scales and types thru such new fields as the author’s Systems Allometry and Systems Mimicry (spin-offs of Systems Processes Theory (SPT)), which also may be classified under the title, Systems Biology.

Further examples of overlap will include the use of network theory in both Systems Biology and Systems Pathology to discover “motifs” (unlikely similarities of part:part interactions true of many diverse system network analyses) and of the use of hierarchical structure to gain the advantages of modularity in both Biosystems and all systems. This latter case has especially been useful as an application of systems theory as a guideline for engineering and as a source of errors in engineering as in Systems Pathology. The overall conclusion will be that many aspects of the widely accepted new field of Systems Biology are similar to the yet untested new field of Systems Pathology.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:00 - 16:25
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3038 Tourist Beach Management, a Perspective from the Systems Thinking (Cancelled!)
The development of tourist activities has been present in different spaces, being one of the most significant the coastline, which valuation as a recreational scenario has motivated the rapid conditioning and transformation of the beaches. The massive tourism produced tourist activities without planning that have undermined the quality of the resource and its aesthetics. In this sense, it is considered important to propose alternatives from the Systems Science that allow designing strategies for the suitable management of these spaces. This paper presents an option which, from a holistic perspective, contributes to strengthen the management of the coast line through the integration of relevant actors in order to protect it. The methodological approach was carried out through Soft Systems Methodology and the Viable System Model, having as a result an inclusive diagnosis that allowed: to characterize the coastline where the study was conducted, to elucidate interrelations between actors who intervene in the problem and determine an administrative structure based on mechanisms of control, coordination, surveillance, respect and estimation of the space coast. The above, in order to strengthen the coastline as a political, social, environmental and economic resource.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3070 MS Windows Productivity Research Applied to Theatre
This work begins interdisciplinary, theoretical support for a new technical age of more creative and varied play writing and more productive theatre performance.

I summarize past, highly validated display theory that is applied in an "interdisciplinary experiment" as technical additions to a professionally, table read, full length play showing justification of the application. Results suggest further interdisciplinary research to take advantage of demonstrated benefits and address interesting problems uncovered. In contrast to much theatre today that stems from past elocution, realism and illusion ages, presently being added are technical elements reinforcing live action and dialogue including projection. Projection had to wait half a century from attempts by Tennessee Williams to introduce it in "The Glass Menagerie." I take this technical addition a step further by projecting an MS Word script with color and embedded sound and images that come with productivity and "viewability" increases traded off with increased pre-performance costs. The article defines these and following constructs. Play writing, performance and audience enjoyment can be greatly enhanced using script projection with embedded technical elements, and I present a needed, better, theoretical approach to play writing supporting this technical addition.

I summarize a Social Science experiment resulting in my former, original display theory, involving Viewability, Complexity, Productivity and MS Windows. That theory is expanded and applied to both play script "pages" in one or more MS Windows and to Proscenium Theatre Production. See papers discussing that experiment presented and published through ISSS in the '90's. I consider projection of a digital script, with embedded multi-media that is played/displayed by the projectionist, as one or more additional "virtual" cast members along with traditional non-human theatre elements. Practical considerations of script projection suggest beneficial changes in the "standard" script format. Original contributions to display theory for playwrights and theatre performance follow from summary and analysis of the results of readings of the experimental play, "Con Te Partiro," in December, 2016. Using the new theory promises very much greater opportunity for variety and creativity to the playwright and audience. MS Word is more powerful and flexible compared to existing play writing Apps. This resulting theory is applied to the script, projected image and proscenium as analogues of Windows.

Points in the theory are correlated with results--validating them as appropriate applications of the prior social sciences experimental results--suggesting a different script format and an architecture for play writing (in development). Lessons learned in the table readings suggest improvements that might be made by Microsoft to Word. Interdisciplinary research opportunities to substantiate other points in the new theory are listed.

This paper lays a guiding, validated, scientific foundation for a new, theoretical architecture of more creative and varied play scripts in a technical, interdisciplinary age of theatre, promising cost savings at performance time.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:00 - 16:30

16:00

3117 A Systems Thinking Perspective for Designing an Online Information Security Laboratory
A person gradually establishes one’s personality and becomes an expert. Such a process is related to some concepts of unconscious learning such as ‘tacit knowing’ by M.Polanyi, ‘identification’ by H.A.Simon, ‘appreciation’ by G.Vickers, ‘legitimate peripheral participation’ by J.Lave and E.Wenger, and ‘blind point’ by O.Scharmer. Based on the concepts, we investigate the fundamental idea of an inquiry and learning process of systems methodologies for knowledge management. We then discuss that the establishment of personality and mastery are a process of exteriorization into an organization. In this presentation I will show some details of the above concerns.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

16:00

16:25

3151 Caveats and Limits on the Systems Pathology-Biomedical Analogy
This paper and presentation focuses on the search for negative evidence for a hypothesis because that task is the hallmark of critical thinking and the scientific method. While it seems unusual to begin a new discipline with examination of all the possible pitfalls or disadvantages of that effort, it appears to this team that a comprehensive search for possible errors is a good way to begin design of a new approach. The paper begins with comparative definitions of analogy, homology, and isomorphy and lessons learned in biomedicine from past mistaken applications of those concepts. It continues with a quick overview of the Systems Pathology analogy with biomedicine, our attempt to capitalize on its vast knowledge base and 5000 years of development to give a significant jump-start to Systems Pathology. The paper describes how research into pathologies or dysfunctions has been a great methodology for advancing the gradual understanding of complex systems of all types in the past, and especially for study of complex systems. It continues with definitions for our use of the words “caveat” and “limits” in this context. It continues by describing at least twenty specific caveats and limits to the Systems Pathology analogy. These include difficulties defining healthy systems, diseased systems, conflating symptoms versus ultimate causes, difficulties in generalizing across all scales, distinguishing change and evolution from dysfunction, avoiding the trap of optimality, avoiding iatrogenic or unintended effects, difficulties in certification of SysPath knowledge, broadening education about Systems Pathology, noting positive aspects of senescence and death, the need for SysPath values and a Hippocratic Oath, and more. With each description, there is a discussion of ways to ameliorate or reverse negative effects. Finally, it lists at least a dozen independent domains of Systems Pathology that are fragmented and remain unintegrated causing difficulties in cross-communication, less transfer of models, barriers to use of knowledge, and generation of new knowledge in our understanding of how to curate or cure ailing systems at all scales. We hope for, anticipate, and enable a future world where humanity protects and preserves its nest of all surrounding systems just as biomedicine attempts to increase longevity and quality of human life.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:25 - 16:50
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3040 Towards a Viable System Model for Mice Tourism in Mexico (Cancelled!)
MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions) Tourism in Mexico generates more than 501 thousand jobs and contributes 1.43% to the national GDP. According to the World Ranking of the International Congress and Convention Association (ICCA) Mexico is increasingly positioned as a destination for this tourism market, becoming a key driver in the economy.

This tourism activity is characterized to be a large-scale phenomenon, in which an interdependence is generated between the various agents involved creating positive and negative impacts and repercussions on the hosting destinations of the events. That is why is relevant manage this activity as a complex system identifying the relationships of its elements to generate solutions considering its economic, social, cultural, and environmental reality.

In this research is presented the current situation of MICE Tourism in Mexico through the Soft Systems Methodology. In the end, all those components and external agents that make up this tourist segment in Mexico can be identified, as well as the problem situations existing in the system and its environment. This diagnosis guides to the generation of a Viable System Model that allows the system to persist over the time despite the changes that occur in the environment, this by the realization of sustainable events.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3037 Can We Train Students to Be Systems Thinkers- Additional Results
Systems thinking, a holistic approach that puts the study of wholes before that of parts, is an efficient way of dealing with real-world situations. By emphasizing the interrelationships between the system's components rather than the components themselves, systems thinking allows us to increase our personal and professional effectiveness, and transform our organizations. Specifically, systems thinkers can conceptually analyse the system without knowing all the details, recognizing the forest through the trees. They can see beyond the surface to the deeper patterns that are responsible for creating behaviour.

The current study deals with the development of systems thinking among students and graduates of technology management. The goals of the study are to identify the factors that influence the development of systems thinking and to find ways to encourage this development. We used a variety of research tools: A questionnaire for assessing the capacity for systems thinking, The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality type test and supervisor evaluations.

In conclusion, the current study findings show that graduates with certain personality traits can gradually acquire or improve their capacity for systems thinking by receiving appropriate training and through a wide range of work experience, and by holding different job positions over time. Having a broad range of professional experience and holding different job positions can help graduates gain knowledge and become familiar with diverse systems and technologies.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3133 Study on Innovation Management through a Case Study Based Approach
Today, innovating new systems, solutions and services at unprecedented rates is critical for the survival of businesses in any industry sector. Increasingly, traditional products and services that are offered by businesses are not sufficient for these businesses to retain their market share and revenues. Hence, businesses are looking at innovation in anticipation of growth in their respective businesses. Globally, it has been established that, businesses need to continuously innovate so as to stay ahead of the competition. While, innovation is supposed to introduce something new to the business that disrupts their value systems, habits and culture, it is often the case that businesses fail to change sufficiently and succeed in their innovations. Even though businesses invest heavily on capital and human resources in order to come up with innovations, it is often the case that these implementations are seldom successful.

Even though businesses try their best to be innovative and adopt a wide variety of approaches, the percentage of successful innovations is significantly less all over the world. In this situation, it is widely recognized that without innovation management, businesses cannot meet the changing requirements and achieve non-linear growth that arises due to innovation. Innovation management deals with the management of business innovation practices, procedures and processes starting from ideation till its successful implementation. There are many approaches, frameworks, methodologies that has been espoused by the leaders in the field to aid in innovation management. Each of these, describe the decisions, activities, and practices that businesses could utilize to generate business value to their customers and other stakeholders in a specific context. To adopt these approaches, frameworks, and methodologies, businesses need to deal with contextual variations/extensions in the business environment, variability in geographies, vertical markets, product lines, services, customers, operating environments, technology platforms, business logic, operating contexts, interaction/integration concerns, market needs, etc.

In this paper, a study to explore the successful innovations of a large conglomerate is discussed. The objective of this study is to understand and reason over an innovation, its structure, intent, purposes, processes, success criteria, constraints, outcomes and its ability to bring in change and disruption in the business domain. Another objective is to identify, classify and understand conceptual foundations, principles, properties, core-ideas and techniques of the innovation management approaches, practices, frameworks, methodologies that were adopted by this large conglomerate and draw meaningful conclusions about their formal and spatial aspects.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:30 - 17:00

16:50

3180 The International Society for Systems Pathology (ISSP) An Initial Image of Websites
This talk and paper develops an overview of the planned online services of the proposed ISSP. Initially there will be two websites on the WWW and one website on Wikipedia. The Wikipedia entry will not be available until all incorporation documents are submitted and approved. When it appears, it will contain the ISSP definition of Domains of the new Systems-level pathology and links to the 27 Pathology Organizations already represented in Wikipedia. Presumably, ISSP will join this listing when submitted.

The website systemspathologies.com will contain the particular research program of Systems Pathology as a spin-off of the Systems Processes Theory (SPT) developed as a candidate GST in the ISSS and INCOSE organizations over the past two decades. This variant Systems Pathology provides a very detailed and rich taxonomy of dysfunctions of systems that are defined as isomorphic, common, or universal across systems at all scales and in all domains. The taxonomy is based on errors that occur in the 55 Isomorphic Systems Processes (ISPs) of the SPT. As such, this website will contain vital information on the ultimate causes or etiology of systems dysfunctions or diseases in general as seen from the systems architecture rather than reductionist level.

Most of this talk and paper will concentrate on description of the third website. The website intsocsyspath.org will make publicly available the official documents and activities of the ISSP organization. The “shell” of this website is already available by invoking that reserved URL. It contains the usual pull-down menu’s for professional societies. The “About” pull-down will have multiple subheadings for ISSP Stats, Overview Definitions of Systems Pathology as used by the ISSP, A Manifesto on Systems Pathology, description of the Major Domains of Systems Pathology and a short history of each of the several domains. The “Membership” pull-down menu will offer information on “Benefits,” “Types/Dues,” and useful “Forms.” The critically important “Working Group” pull-down menu will contain lists of working groups (WGs),” “special committee’s,” and “special research projects.” The ISSP By-Laws require the Board of Director’s to name and find leadership for WGs that represent all of the existing domains that might have interest in a systems-level aspect of Pathology. The “Meetings” pull-down menu will include information on current annual conferences, annual workshops, and any geographically local meetings as well as co-sponsored, related conferences. The “Publications” pull-down will contain information on ISSP publications as described in the following Katina talk and paper. The “Products/Services” pull-down will inform members of the ISSP “Newsletters,” “Knowledge Data Base,” ISSP “Awards,” and ISSP official “Bibliographies.” The “Administration” pull-down will offer information on “Officers,” “Chapters,” “By-Laws” and other official documents. The “Education” pull-down will include information for Professional Development in the new Field. The final pull-down, “Alliances” will contain links to related and cooperating professional societies such as the ISSS, INCOSE, IFSR, AAAS, ISSB, and more. Screen shots of these pages will be shown in powerpoint. Participants will be asked to suggest additional features for online development of the new field of Systems Pathology. The authors will be happy to discuss further the pro’s and con’s of online education and WWW professional development from their past extensive experiences.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 16:50 - 17:15
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3213 Social Inclusion and Competitiveness in Smart Tourist Destinations: a Systemic Perspective (Cancelled!)
The development of smart cities is considered an alternative to face urban problems; one of them is the growth of population with disabilities and senior citizens, which will lead to sustainability issues particularly those dealing with services and infrastructure. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the need for innovation in the tourism sector, considering the Triple Helix model to achieve competitiveness in urban tourism destinations.

This research presents a literature review of the smart cities characteristics, challenges, and opportunities that bring technological development in social inclusion. The Soft Systems Methodology is applied to show how the smart tourism destination can be modeled. This review shows that smart cities can make more competitive and inclusive the tourism destinations, considering the cultural, economic, politic and social context and how the Triple Helix model of innovation is capable of building strategies and public politics that bring social inclusion for people with disabilities and senior citizens, making the city a more competitive destination.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3095 Ability to Raise Questions as a Modern Skill
The paper is devoted to the issue of cooperation and coordination of efforts in modern world. The role of questions is being considered. Authors describe three new techniques of raising and using questions and put the problem of developing forms and methods of education that will motivate and teach people to raise questions.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3104 Digital Journey in Customer Experience Modelling
High risk projects within a stakeholder community invite the use of systems thinking to understand the underlying complexities embedded in the relationships around assumptions of risk. Incorporating systemically derived metaphors into a project vision and scoping activity (the model system in this study being a Class III medical device design-development early planning stage), that encourages the visualization of an evolving lifecycle reference system, enables the collective formation of critical knowledge – or knowledge that compels intentional actions. A combination of entry points for systems thinking and practice into the discourse landscape of a stakeholder community (such as a project Case Study, the follow-on Business Case and GAAP recognized accounting reports linked to an associated balance sheet) can leverage the efficacy of collective economic impact valuations for a given stakeholder project venture (e.g. a private-public-partnership). Integrating a philosophy of systems with contemporary stakeholder and accounting theory, and selected entrepreneurial theories from business and non-profit models, offers a compelling approach to the collective task of a priori risk-design at the outset of a multi-entity venture. Learning how to cooperatively build a reference system of intrinsic and instrumental values that can then adapt to the dynamic emergence of stakeholder ecology decision lifecycles is an ongoing collaborative effort in values engineering. A systems philosophy approach, that surfaces critical-boundaries where the presuppositions and beliefs of stakeholder principals interact with consequence, can liberate the values engineering process and strengthen the understanding of social imperatives that can serve to regeneratively drive motivations and the subsequent choices that make a difference.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 17:00 - 17:30

17:15

3161 The International Society for Systems Pathology (ISSP): An Initial Image of Publications
This presentation establishes an initial image of the planned comprehensive publication program for the new professional society - International Society for Systems Pathology (ISSP). It describes the contents of five proposed products or services: a semi-annual bulletin, a proposed Annual Yearbook (or volumes of an Annual Review of Systems Pathology), a new proposed Journal devoted to publishing peer-reviewed research articles on Systems Pathology, an initial Review Book (i.e., Introductory Collection of Chapters on Systems Pathology), and a Bibliographic Manual giving the source citations for important foundational papers. Each of these will be described in the talk.

The overall goal of the publication program is derived from the goals of the ISSP as reflected in its society’s By-Laws. These include promoting wider awareness of the multiple domains of Systems Pathology, enabling communication among domains, researching mechanisms by which systems dysfunction, enabling transfer of concepts, theories, techniques and tools, developing models, taxonomies, applications, that are useful across domains, and promoting synthesis, unification and integration across the currently separated domains of Systems Pathology. Publications should also play an important role in education in Systems Pathology and both expanding and disseminating its knowledge base.

The first planned publication is the Bulletin that informs the membership about the growth, organization, and activities of the Society. The Bulletin’s will contain regular sections with the following titles: Editorial; Managing Director’s Report; ISSP Business; Meetings and Conferences; Guest Articles; Products and Services; Reports from Working Groups and Chapters; Correspondence; Members Bulletin Board, and more.

At this moment, the second publication will be an introductory text containing a collection of chapters on Systems Pathology. This proposed text will include chapters by noted authors representing different types of pathology from the systems point of view and on the systems level. Effort will be made to include chapters representing all domains relevant to Systems Pathology including, among others, Systems Engineering, Systems Science, Systems Thinking, Sustainability, Design and Management, Anatomical, Clinical (including molecular conventional medical pathologies),and Systems Biology.

The Annual Yearbook is intended for libraries and will mimic the structure of the initial Introductory Collection in that it will include selections from the best publications representative of every known domain of Systems Pathology. The Editor-in-Chief will make these selections with the help of an at-large Editorial Board composed of experts in each one of the Domains of Systems Pathology cited above.

ISSP intends on creating a scholarly journal, a periodical publication, in which scholarship relating to Systems Pathology can be published. This yet-to-be named journal will serve as a permanent and transparent forum for the presenting, scrutinizing, and discussion on topics related to Sytstems Pathology research. The journal will be peer-reviewed by members of ISSP and experts in domains of applications. Content will typically take the form of articles presenting original research. However, reviews and books, as well as opinions and technical papers will be solicited. Staying true to Henry Oldenburg, researchers, government, and industrial leaders are “invited and encouraged to search, try, and find out new things, impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences” (Oldenburg, 1965, p. 2) – in terms of pathology, of course.

A Bibliographic Manual, will be developed and updated, accordingly. This manual will provide sources (and citations) to foundational papers relevant to Systems Pathology.

These efforts, will require significant efforts and will be part of the activities for the new ISSP society. Finally, the specific details, for example, the number of issues per year for the proposed journal, are still ‘unknown.’ These details will emerge as the society matures.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 17:15 - 17:35
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3225 Theoretical Proposal from Systems’ Thinking for the Intelligent Tourism System (Cancelled!)
The Workshop is in three parts: (1) the theoretical foundation of SAGE-P, (2) the ‘big data’ algorithm to construct SAGE-P and (3) the policies to reduce the rate of entropy production per unit of consumption. While part (1) and (2) are theoretical/technical issues, part (3) assumes the focal point of the Workshop. The participants will be introduced to a hierarchical structure of values upon which to frame policies aimed at reducing to a minimum the rate of entropy production per unit of consumption of economic, social and ecological product. This value-structure represents the essential cultural values unique to each, and every, decision-taking unit, be it a village level council to a grand UN Assembly of Nations, be it a family household to multi billion dollar investors of multinational Corporations.

We have formalised, and thus reduced, the value-structure to represent the qualitative properties of ‘objects’ and ‘functions’ we wish to conserve in any well-defined (complex) Economic, Social and Ecological System. Employed is the concepts of Category Theory to map values on any well-defined set of objects/functions we wish to conserve: {i.e., A: Ecosphere; values conserved-in-themselves, or intrinsic → B: Sociosphere; values conserved-in-use → C: Econosphere; values conserved-in-exchange. Or A [B(C)]}.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3069 Soft Systems Methodology and Cognitive Mapping: A Linkage Between the Initial Phases of Designing Educational Systems
Systems Thinking enables to simplify our thinking about and management of complex realities and messes. Throughout the existence of the Systems Thinking philosophy several systems approaches have been developed with varying perspectives and purposes. This paper focus on the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) which emerged from the Hard Systems approaches, such as Systems Engineering. The aim was to use systems principles for unstructured, ill-defined problematical situations. The main system concepts that SSM build on are emerging properties, hierarchy, and feedback communication. Through its use the notion of worldview for meaningful actions has evolved as crucial. This paper builds on this notion and include Cognitive Mapping to make plain different worldviews and their relation to meaningful action in a hierarchical approach. Cognitive Mapping also has its roots in Systems Thinking approaches. Its origins in psychology and have been included in Operational Research applications with the aim of mapping and representing how a person thinks about a particular situation, issue or problem.

The paper discusses the features of Soft Systems Methodology and Cognitive Mapping including the interrelation. The combination of these approaches is demonstrated in a case which investigates the complexity of compulsory school teachers’ use of digital technologies in their everyday practice. The research followed a focused ethnographic approach, based on observations and interviews, which allowed the researcher to collect rich empirical data that related to various stakeholder perspectives. These perspectives affect the everyday practice of the school teachers and their possibilities to combine use of digital technology in education and own teaching philosophy.

Through the combination of Cognitive Mapping and one of the SSM modelling techniques we demonstrate an approach that bridges the richness of the real-world situation and the analytical phase of SSM. This approach advanced the understanding of underlying factors that contribute to the complexity of this particular situation and enabled insights which, if transferred to appropriate actions, may lead to an improved situation for involved stakeholders.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3096 Industry Needs for Data Warehousing Students: Using SSM as Hermeneutic Data Analysis Tool for Interpretive Interview Data
The soft systems methodology was developed by Peter Checkland over an extended period of time to assist organisational improvements. It provides tools to assist different stakeholders to articulate their perspectives on the best action to be taken in problem environments. It is grounded in the ideas of soft systems thinking, where systems are viewed as conceptual models to make sense of a messy real world environment. The original focus of soft systems methodology is organisational use rather than academic use. In this paper we demonstrate how the soft systems methodology can be used to guide and analyse interpretive interviews with participants in an academic research project in the context of interpretive research methodology.

We reflect on the hermeneutic nature of interpretive qualitative data collection and analysis and then we show that an activity diagram as used in the soft systems methodology, is a valid data analysis technique in terms of the epistemological context of interpretive data analysis.

We demonstrate our proposal by means of the data analysis of interpretive interviews of data warehouse practitioners on their perspectives of the required skills of information technology students majoring in data warehousing. We compiled activity diagrams and used them in communication with our participants, thus enabling our participants to verify our data analysis and enhance our understanding of their perspectives. We show how different perspectives can be represented and reflected upon after compiling activity diagrams and how different perspectives can be accommodated to develop a single strategy for change.

Our main contribution is to demonstrate the suitability of the soft systems methodology in data collection and analysis in interpretive cases studies where strategies for changes are studied.

The paper is organised in four main sections, starting with a discussion on the ontological and epistemological assumptions of interpretive case studies in order to show that it is possible to use the soft systems methodology from an interpretive research perspective. The second section provides a very brief discussion of the soft systems methodology. Our main contribution is in section three, providing justification and guidance for using the soft systems methodology to guide data collection and analysis in the context of interpretive research methodology. We demonstrate our proposal in the fourth section, where we show how we analysed interpretive interview data. Our paper concludes with reflection and recommendations.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 17:30 - 18:00

17:35

3164 Status Report on the Founding of ISSP International Society for Systems Pathology
This short conclusion talk and paper will report on the current status of founding the 501c3 non-profit, the International Society for Systems Pathology. Handouts for the participants will include the final By-Laws for the ISSP, Articles of Incorporation for the ISSP, a Manifesto for Systems Pathology, and a listing of current officers and members of the Board of Director’s. Projections of membership from the many domains of Systems Pathology will be presented. A timetable for the remaining tasks will be discussed. Forms for joining the ISSP will be distributed. Consistent with the title of this Joint Session of the ISSS Systems Pathology SIG and the Systems Biology/Evolution SIG, ISSP will provide a new and additional scientific research and professional development home for both topics. The International Business Office (IBO) of the ISSP will be at 232 Harrison Ave., Claremont, California, 91711.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 17:35 - 18:00
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

18:00

By Invitation: @ MAK: Hello, Robot! (Exhibition Preview)
DESIGN BETWEEN HUMAN AND MACHINEWED, 21.06.2017–SUN, 01.10.2017 MAK EXHIBITION HALL
By invitation and guidance of the director, Dr. Thun-Hohenstein, the night consists of a Tour by invitation of the  MAK Exhibition, "Hello, Robot", an exhibition of the MAK, the Vitra Design Museum, and the Design museum Gent.   All ISSS Conference attendees have admission to the MAK with the evening commencing at 6.00pm.

 To some extent unheard and unseen, robotics—driven by Digital Modernity—has already fundamentally altered our working and daily lives. Yet people’s relationship to new technologies is often ambivalent. As the first comprehensive exhibition about the opportunities and challenges surrounding robotics, Hello, Robot. Design between Human and Machine broadens its scope to include the ethical and political questions arising from these enormous technological advances.

Subdivided into four chapters (“Science and Fiction,” “Programmed for Work,” “Friend and Helper,” “Becoming one”), Hello, Robot. tells the story of a convergence of human and machine, while being organized in an interdisciplinary fashion. More than 200 exhibition objects from the realms of art, design, and architecture, as well as examples from technology, film, literature, fashion, science, and pop culture examine the inexorable hype around intelligent machines and the crucial role played by design. In addition to providing a leitmotif through the exhibition, 14 questions illuminate dealings with robotics. They invite visitors to reassess their own stance towards new technologies and convey that there is a fine line between opportunities and risks.

In the discourse swirling around robotics, design bridges seemingly insurmountable contradictions. While the debate about robots and artificial intelligence swerves back and forth between enthusiasm and criticism, between utopia and dystopia, between hopes for a better, high-tech world and fear that humans will be marginalized, design delivers concrete solutions as well as thought experiments demonstrating that often the truth lies in both extremes simultaneously.

Tuesday July 11, 2017 18:00 - 19:30
MAK (Museum of Applied Arts), Vienna Stubenring 5, 1010 Wien, Austria

18:00

Dinner available at nearby local restaurants
Tuesday July 11, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Local Restaurants 1040 Wien, Austria
 
Wednesday, July 12
 

07:15

#ISSS2017 Vienna Roundtable
Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below) | | Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science... Read More →

Wednesday July 12, 2017 07:15 - 08:30
Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Sciences Paulanergasse 13, 1040 Wien, Austria

08:00

Morning Registration Desk Open
Foyer

Wednesday July 12, 2017 08:00 - 13:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

08:45

Day 3 Introduction: From Public Health to Health Systems
Health Day

The promises of social and technological changes in health systems should help secure the provision of health care systems for everyone. The conference will, therefore, address the pressing system's problems of health literacy, the social requirements for health, and the need of healthy ageing in increasingly ageing societies, as well as systemic approaches to tackle cross-border health threats. \

Scientists, engineers and health professionals, as well as political leaders, will critically assess the promises of evidence-based medicine, digital health care delivery systems, health systems benchmarks and rankings that are enabled through digitalization as well as providing insights into the newly emerging areas of conflict in ‘trusting the system’ versus ‘trusting people’.


Wednesday July 12, 2017 08:45 - 09:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:00

Keynote Science: Dr. Patricia Mabry
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Patricia Mabry

Dr. Patricia Mabry

Executive Director and Senior Research Scientist, Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI)
Dr. Mabry joined the Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI) as its first Executive Director in October 2015. She manages the IUNI staff (12), oversees policy development for the organization, and fosters development of IUNI educational offerings and pursuit of collaborative... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 09:00 - 09:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:30

Keynote Practice: Dr. Clemens Martin Auer
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Clemens Martin Auer 

Dr. Clemens Martin Auer 

Head of Department, Federal Ministry of Health
Auer studied Philosophy and Political Science at the University of Vienna and earned his doctorate with Norbert Leser in 1991 . | From 1993 to 2003, he was head of the Political Department of the Austrian People's Party (ÖVP) under Vice Chancellor Erhard Busek , later Chancellor... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 09:30 - 10:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:00

Keynote Science: 'Systems Thinking for Community Involvement in Public Health and Health Service Design' - Professor Gerald Midgley
#3149 Systems Thinking for Community Involvement in Public Health and Health Service Design (PLENARY)

Gerald Midgley Centre for Systems Studies, Business School, University of Hull, UK In this presentation I will discuss the value of systems thinking, focusing in particular on the involvement of multiple stakeholders, including members of local communities, in decision making on complex health issues. I will outline a methodology for systemic intervention, which supports people in exploring values and boundaries for analysis, and offers methods for opening participation to members of local communities who may have no previous experience in planning or management. In principle, this is systems thinking for everyone; in practice, the boundaries of participation need to be the focus of critical and systemic exploration, given that it is usually impossible to involve literally everyone. Systemic
intervention also emphasises the creative mixing of methods drawn from multiple paradigms, and this might involve quantitative methods from the traditional sciences sitting alongside systems approaches for service design to make intervention much more flexible and responsive to stakeholder and community concerns than it might otherwise be. This methodology will be illustrated throughout my talk with practical examples from my teams’ projects on public health and social systems design in both the UK and New Zealand.

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Gerald Midgley

Prof. Gerald Midgley

Professor of Systems Thinking, Centre for Systems Studies
Gerald Midgley is Professor of Systems Thinking in the Centre for Systems Studies, Business School, University of Hull, UK. He also holds Adjunct Professorships at Mälardalen University, Sweden; the University of Queensland, Australia; the University of Canterbury, New Zealand; and... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 10:00 - 10:40
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:40

Keynote: Q&A
Wednesday July 12, 2017 10:40 - 10:55
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:55

Break / Networking
Wednesday July 12, 2017 10:55 - 11:25
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:25

Keynote Practice: Prof. Dr. Fredmund Malik - ' 3246 Meta-systems as master controls of management, leadership and governance'
My approach to management differs fundamentally from conventional thinking which is mainly oriented on business and making profit. In contrast, I understand right and good management as the function of society that enables its organizations and systems to function reliably according to their purpose – in all kinds of organizations. Management decisions and pro- cesses create purpose, orientation and structure in order to achieve results. In doing so, management also fulfills societal and political responsibility, and also basic ethical values. The master controls in this sense are meta-systems and meta-models.

Today, management means mastering complexity on the basis of the complexity sciences, i.e. systems theory, cybernetics and bionics. It makes use of complexity itself, of self-regulation and self-organization, and of evolutionary processes for organizational learning, adaptability, change and transformation. Therefore our innovations in management offer fundamentally new solutions for shaping and leading organizations, for transformational change and its effective implementation.

Management systems are the evolutionary operating system for organizations.

What operating systems are to computers by analogy, management is to organizations. We can see it as the societal and evolutionary operating system for organizations of all kinds and sizes. There is thus a functional continuum from the DNA in the biological cell, to computer operating systems, to the human central nervous system and to management systems for organizations. In order to work, meta-systems and models are needed to guide perception, thinking and acting in organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Dr. oec. habil. Fredmund Malik

Prof. Dr. oec. habil. Fredmund Malik

Scientist, author, advisor and educator; Chairman of Management Center St. Gallen, Switzerland and Malik Institute for Complexity Management, Governance and Leadership, Malik
Prof. Dr. Fredmund Malik is known as the pioneer of the state-of-the-art holistic systems-based management. His revolutionary navigation and management systems ensure effective and efficient functioning of organizations. The Malik Management Systems support top executives in mastering... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 11:25 - 11:45
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:45

Health Panel Session: Prof. em. Dr. Markus Schwaninger, Prof. Dr. Dr. Dr. Felix Tretter, Dr. Niki Popper, Dr. Josef Probst
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Niki Popper

Dr. Niki Popper

Chairman, DEXHELPP
Nikolas “Niki” Popper studied Mathematics, Philosophy and Jazz Theory in Vienna, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain) and Moscow, Idaho (US) and received his ScD (Dr.techn.) at TU Wien. Niki Popper published and presented about 150 articles and talks in journals and at international... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Josef Probst

Dr. Josef Probst

General Manager, Main Association of Austrian Social Security Institutions
Josef Probst studied law at the University of Linz and worked four years at the Institute of Labour Law and Social Security. He began his career in the Social Health Insurance at the regional fund of Upper Austria. In 1991, he changed to the Main Association of Austrian Social Security... Read More →
avatar for Prof. em. Dr. Markus Schwaninger

Prof. em. Dr. Markus Schwaninger

Prof., University of St. Gallen
s a professor of management at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland (emeritus since 2013). Born in Salzburg, Austria; double citizenship – Austrian and Swiss. His research and teaching are focused on the management of complex dynamic systems, with a methodological emphasis... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Dr. Dr. Dr. Felix Tretter

Prof. Dr. Dr. Dr. Felix Tretter

Fellow, Bertalanffy Centre for the Studies of Systems Sciences (BCSSS)
SIG Co-Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems (see below for details)This SIG Socio-Ecological Systems intends to help advance a sound epistemology and methodology for socio-ecological systems design in conjunction with socio-technological systems design. At the interface of science... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 11:45 - 12:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

12:30

13:00

Lunch
Wednesday July 12, 2017 13:00 - 14:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3113 Towards a Generative Formulation of Mechanistic Systems
Every discipline of engineering has an extensive body of knowledge relating to the design and analysis of its systems. Systems engineering community (INCOSE) has worked through the commonalities across these engineering disciplines, and created SEBOK, that applies to the design of any kind of system, particularly mechanistic systems across different engineering domains. While there is widespread agreement on the concepts, as articulated in SEBOK, there is still some sense that the field is empirical, and it would be desirable to create formal foundations. For example, it is widely accepted that design synthesis needs to be complemented by analysis and verification – but there is no theoretical basis for explaining why it is needed. The broad agenda for Systems scientists has been to build these foundations and provide the theoretical basis for the different concepts that are found useful by system engineers.

In this paper, an experiment to explore and extend the explanatory power of the commonly accepted concepts in systems engineering is discussed. It formulates an abstraction of a “block” based on existing systems engineering concepts. This abstract concept, “block”, is described in terms of elements such as inputs, outputs, state, characteristics, outcomes and relationships with the context. It is realized recursively as a network/hierarchy of blocks, giving rise to structures and processes that produce the outcomes. It is conjectured that this network/hierarchy of blocks can be generated through recursive application of three operations: decomposition, dependency closure and realization.

The value of the block concept is explored by applying it to explain several of the practices and phenomena in SEBOK, including the Vee model. It leads to a specific framing of the concept of domains, the nature of domain knowledge, and relationships between domains which is presented in this paper. It also provides an explanation of the need for analysis to complement synthesis, as well as subsequent verification. We believe that this conceptual approach holds promise in terms of creating a framework for reasoning about engineering systems. The current formulation is expressed and discussed in conceptual terms, but it could be formalized mathematically. The result would be an abstract mathematical construct that could enable abstract reasoning about systems phenomena and engineering practice, at least for mechanistic systems.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3128 Pilot Case Study: How Two Nonprofit Education Foundations Use Social Media to Support Systemic Engagement
Easily available and widely used, social media tools look like a boon for small, nonprofit organizations that need systemic approaches for disseminating information and cultivating networks for donor and member engagement, especially those relying on a few paid staff and many good-hearted volunteers to do the work. This case study examines the experiences of two nonprofit organizations and the complexities, constraints, and contextual challenges that have made adopting social media practices more difficult and less effective than industry advisers, researchers, and examples suggest. Leaders of these two education foundations describe themselves as caught between the demands of tending key person-to-person relationships and the additional duties associated with cultivating interactive relational networks through social media. The experiences described in this instrumental case study align with themes found across trans-disciplinary research on social media and organizations. These themes are social media, organizational capacity, and the changing concept of engagement.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:00 - 14:30

14:00

3155 Systematic Thinking in Science Education
In the past, whether within kingdom, empire, colony, or republic, young Koreans had to remain focused on passing tests, even in the midst of the war or the collapse of schools and the emergence of private education in the Joseon Dynasty period (1392-1910). Because private tutoring has been a major factor in Korean education for 650 years now, it can be seen as a major influence on the weak development of an integrated education experience in Korea. However, integrated education strengthening basic science education, linking liberal arts and natural sciences, and developing skills in problem solving rather than rote memorization will be necessary for successful participation in the impending Fourth Industrial Revolution.

South Korea's science education is caught in a web of paradoxes. Basic science education is weak, but memorization education for the university entrance examination is the best in the world. Students display a low level of creative thinking compared to advanced countries, but their academic achievement is very high. Koreans have been content to remain in the mindset of their proverb, “‘It is the fastest thing to be late.” Yet college students do not seem content to wait, given their tendency to break away from their majors. Although educational policies and curricula are constantly in flux, why have these patterns emerged, and how can they be changed?

This study examines the relevance and goals of science education through the perspective of recent work in brain science. Specifically, we will examine the relationship between creativity and the biology of the brain, in particular the division between the left and right brains. Brain research focused on cognitive function differentiation has strongly indicated that cooperation between the left and right brains is essential for increasing the ability for creative thinking. Yet the focus on memorization in Korean education can result in relatively weak left brain development, which can shortchange left brain functions including abilities to learn and apply mathematics, language expression, logical reasoning, and rational thinking and criticism.

In summary, although both the left and right brains share roles in creative thinking, Korea's entrance examination does not fully utilize the brain’s differentiated cognitive functions. We need a balanced basic science education with the long-term goal of effective left and right brain development, not the short-term goal of admission to a good college.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3190 Advancing Knowledge By Looking Up as Well as Down
Presently there is growing interest in “translating” knowledge so that it is easier for practitioners to use it. The intent is to minimize jargon and maximize the utility of knowledge. I agree with these efforts, and I have done such work myself. Applied knowledge is very important, particularly for transdisciplinary fields. Working on practical problems almost always requires the perspectives and methods of more than one discipline.

However, if we devote too much attention to translation or technology transfer or applications, we might miss some opportunities. In addition to asking how a theory can be used, it is also useful to know where a theory came from or what was the context or the origin of the theory? In addition to reasoning down to applications, it can also be helpful to reason up the philosophical and historical origins of ideas.

This paper will examine the ancient philosophical questions that various societies have asked in an effort to learn the nature of the intellectual journey that the society was engaged in and how the fundamental philosophical questions that were of concern emerged from the practical problems the society had faced.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:00 - 14:45
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

(By Invitation Only) WORKSHOP: PART I: Joint workshop with the Austrian Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology on Smart Cities Research
Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan


Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:00 - 15:30
Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Sciences Paulanergasse 13, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

DISCUSSION: Health Systems: Continuing Morning Plenary and Panel Discussion - From Qualitative to Quantitative Systems Methods and Interventions in Health Care Systems
Chairs
avatar for Prof. Dr. Dr. Dr. Felix Tretter

Prof. Dr. Dr. Dr. Felix Tretter

Fellow, Bertalanffy Centre for the Studies of Systems Sciences (BCSSS)
SIG Co-Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems (see below for details)This SIG Socio-Ecological Systems intends to help advance a sound epistemology and methodology for socio-ecological systems design in conjunction with socio-technological systems design. At the interface of science... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Patricia Mabry

Dr. Patricia Mabry

Executive Director and Senior Research Scientist, Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI)
Dr. Mabry joined the Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI) as its first Executive Director in October 2015. She manages the IUNI staff (12), oversees policy development for the organization, and fosters development of IUNI educational offerings and pursuit of collaborative... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Gerald Midgley

Prof. Gerald Midgley

Professor of Systems Thinking, Centre for Systems Studies
Gerald Midgley is Professor of Systems Thinking in the Centre for Systems Studies, Business School, University of Hull, UK. He also holds Adjunct Professorships at Mälardalen University, Sweden; the University of Queensland, Australia; the University of Canterbury, New Zealand; and... Read More →
avatar for Dr. Niki Popper

Dr. Niki Popper

Chairman, DEXHELPP
Nikolas “Niki” Popper studied Mathematics, Philosophy and Jazz Theory in Vienna, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain) and Moscow, Idaho (US) and received his ScD (Dr.techn.) at TU Wien. Niki Popper published and presented about 150 articles and talks in journals and at international... Read More →
avatar for Prof. em. Dr. Markus Schwaninger

Prof. em. Dr. Markus Schwaninger

Prof., University of St. Gallen
s a professor of management at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland (emeritus since 2013). Born in Salzburg, Austria; double citizenship – Austrian and Swiss. His research and teaching are focused on the management of complex dynamic systems, with a methodological emphasis... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:00 - 15:30
6th Floor, Kontaktraum, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

WORKSHOP: 3182 The Boundary Triage, its Objects and Heuristics: Developing Critical Systemic Leadership for the Networked World
This workshop introduces and invites you to engage with the Boundary Triage, its Objects and Embodied Cognition heuristics as a personalised continuing leadership development tool for the networked world.
In an increasingly socially networked world dependent on social technologies, leadership and continuing leadership development is of continuing importance. Increased information from our environment on many levels is demanding from us to be more critical of the information that we receive and how we communicate, despite the many platforms and media available to us to communicate.
Grounded theoretically in General Systems Theory, Critical Systems Thinking and Cybernetics, and supported by psychosocial and physio-psychological we will explore interactively the Boundary Triage, its Objects and the Embodied Cognition Heuristics. The workshop aims to provide an innovative, engaging, simple, easy to remember, employable, and transferrable continuing critical systemic leadership development tool – potentially an androrithm (an algorithm for the evolution of Man) – focussing on the key system concept ‘Boundary’.

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:00 - 15:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 124, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

Afternoon Registration Desk Open
Foyer, Campus Gusshaus

Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:00 - 17:30
Foyer G

14:30

3107 Grounding Transformation in Articulation
The advent of digital transformation invading all societal and economic systems requires to re-consider the generative nature of socio-technical system design. Transformation needs to be studied, in particular how links are continuously explored and accelerated between existing as well new systems. The accelerated production of relations does not only substantiate system thinking, but also characterizes the fundamental nature of digital production systems.

As digital transformations are complex, some scholars have already called for a system science approach to deal with. Thereby, traditional cognitive or top-down approaches to regulate or control dynamic processes are seen as ‘last resort’. Evolving complex systems bear systemic challenges, which are wicked due to their social or cultural nature and incomplete, contradictory, interconnected, and changing requirements that are often difficult to recognize.

Bringing together complexity and wicked problems theories to understand how individual organizations and change agents can better influence large system change. We have developed a framework that helps to understand and cope with system interventions while taking the perspective of individual agents for change in organizations. Consequently, we do not only need to put forward theoretical understanding of transformation and change management by positioning the organization in the context of a broader system, but also need to define its role in creating change based on articulation of individual stakeholders. Individually informed articulation (e.g., on underlying principles for certain behavior patterns) is likely to facilitate addressing the nature of wicked problems by setting informed relations between individual systems and the large systems where they are embedded.

In articulation the relation of individuals as change agents and their relations to organizations and society in transformational change are considered. Sharing relational background knowledge and developing relations allow creating transformations that can be substantial and lead to emergence system behavior due to that change. In the presented samples stemming from organizational development, the essential role of individuals in a situated while cognitive transformation process becomes evident. In contrast to behavioral manipulation, cognitive transformation acts in a subjective environment. It can be experienced by everyone in the same situational context. Transformations are achieved to giving situations a different meaning than before.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:30 - 15:00

14:30

3116 Theoretical Aspect of Systems Methodology for Knowledge Management
A person gradually establishes one’s personality and becomes an expert. Such a process is related to some concepts of unconscious learning such as ‘tacit knowing’ by M.Polanyi, ‘identification’ by H.A.Simon, ‘appreciation’ by G.Vickers, ‘legitimate peripheral participation’ by J.Lave and E.Wenger, and ‘blind point’ by O.Scharmer. Based on the concepts, we investigate the fundamental idea of an inquiry and learning process of systems methodologies for knowledge management. We then discuss that the establishment of personality and mastery are a process of exteriorization into an organization. In this presentation I will show some details of the above concerns.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3177 Assessment of Systems Thinking and Systems Analysis Skills in Higher Education: the Case of a Sustainable Resource Management Program
System thinking and system analysis are important skills in solving problems in our complex world. Research from the last two decades showed that students of all domains of sciences are not well prepared to understand correctly the dynamic behaviour of even very simple systems. This phenomenon can be tested and evaluated with help of so-called bathtub tasks that represent simple stock and flow relationships of simple systems. Many studies identified a surprisingly poor performance on different levels of education and even on the level of domain experts. This raises the question if sufficient education in system science will result in better performance to solve complex system problems. Since, 2001, the School of Forest Science and Resource Management of the Technische Universität München offers the International Master of Science (MSc.) Program in Sustainable Resource Management (SRM) which attracts students from all over the world. The SRM Programme includes classes in systems theory and systems analysis in order to improve students’ ability to understand and solve complex problems in interrelated systems that are commonly subject of resource management activities. At the beginning of the system theory class students are invited to participate in an assessment that includes a questionnaire and solving system dynamics tasks (bathtub tasks). The questionnaire asks about their personal and educational background, previous experiences in system sciences and their opinion about own skills and the relevance of system thinking in their career. The bathtub tasks are slightly modified applications of the original bathtub tasks so that results can be compared with other existing studies. The presentation will show some selected results and discuss some experiences from these activities. Until now, poor performances of master students still persist. Only very few students choose to focus more on system thinking and systems analysis skills in their further study programme. However, presumably other scientific methods and approaches are much more accepted and appreciated in conventional academic educational systems than systems thinking and system analysis. It is recommended to increase the presents and relevance of courses on system thinking and system analysis into contemporary academic education.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:45

15:00

Cancelled: 3162 A Cybernetic Approach for Changing Vehicular Circulation from Difficult to Smart in Cities of Developing Countries
We describe the partial results of a research in systems engineering for a specific socio-technical situation. It addresses the problem of urban circulation in Latin American cities not so technologically advanced. The rating of their circulation performance is very low, when travel times are considered, which produces big ecological, health and economic impacts. The problem is serious and it is still growing. The city traffic system is complex because of the large number of participants and because of the intricacies of their interrelationships. The difficulty of framing this research is observed in that it touches on five known thematic axes: Governance, Economy, Health, Ecology and Technology. The central idea to communicate is that the solution to the problem must be systemic. No feasible solutions will be obtained if the implemented actions are of trial-and-error nature, only technical or only social reductionist approaches, or copied from solutions designed for cities of different locations. The proposal is to gather the main city stakeholders at the systemic academic approach and to guide the improvement process with tested and validated effective actions. Some of the difficulties that have been detected so far concern: describing the unstructured problem; setting up the soft systemic model and finding the feasibility conditions for the solution. After looking at the literature on the subject, outstanding scientific advances are found in the topics of the ecological automobile, the autonomous vehicle or the smart city, with proposals based on electromechanical, communications, and computing fields. They are taken into account for the project, but their expectation for been operative does not make them affordable for this case. Nevertheless, many autonomous vehicle details could be useful under a systemic view: what makes it operational is the information exchange with its environment. The synergetic operation of traffic in a congested city requires a proper information usage. In several studied cases, the urban infrastructure does not inform the driver about the restrictions, the driver does not take advantage of information to execute his actions and the traffic regulation does not profit of information to provide corrective actions. Moreover, punitive measures are privileged over preventive ones. Solving the congestion questions of these cities would only be possible if improving actions are also committed to the physical infrastructure, the traffic regulations and the respectful driving subsystems. For this reason, organizational transformation is imperative. Within the project, coordination between soft and hard system models is analyzed, aiming to carry out simulations of identified noteworthy conflict situations. And feasibility will be particularly taken into account before implementation through the agreement of the administrative, technical and social parties, based on the research work conducted at the systemic academic guide.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
TBA

15:00

3089 What Does Constructor Theory Construct? - Knowledge as a Physical Property
“Constructor theory of eigenbehavior” is the most appropriate short way to describe what this article is about. To those who have encountered the idea of eigenbehavior for the first time through this issue and article, let’s say that it is related to recursions within and emergence of consciousness and information in general. In a back and forth manner between constructor theory of possible tasks and eigenbehavior as a viable (since it passes the test of existence) phenomenon. This author uses in an already published paper the metaphor of systems as footprints and wonders what kind of “animal” (constructor) might leave them behind. This article goes further in combining and criticizing constructor theory with the concept of eigenbehavior. Interpretations of quantum mechanics and physical principles are also elaborated.

The following definition is the central idea of this article. We shall insist on it even in cases when something looks unexpected, (counter)intuitive, or inevitable.

Constructor theory is the theory of which transformations

input state of substrates --> output state of substrates

can be caused and which cannot, and why.

It is a search for physical principles allegedly more fundamental than physical laws. Instead of doing physics as usual based upon initial and physical laws, the initiators of constructor theory are foremost interested in fundamentals of quantum computation, but also want to know deeper truths about other phenomena such as information, life, and thermodynamics. All of them are for different reasons closely related to what we call here eigenbehavior. This idea isn’t entirely new, but the way frame the discussion is framed with the aforementioned definition is. Worth mentioning here is also General Systems Theory (GST).

Similarities behind constructivism and constructor theory are not just in similar words, but also in their approaches to expectations from reality and doing scientific work. It is a similar mindset when we try to understand minds by shadows they cast or systems by footprints they leave behind.

The author is implementing in this paper an approach similar to constructivism, but does that in a way that other proponents of constructivism might not approve. Systems science requires a radical change of perspective and this is where the constructivist approach is helpful – in encouragement of open-mindedness about reality and ideology and playfulness with mental constructs. Constructivism in its radical form denies any ultimate truth and this is the point at which we should stop playing and get serious and rigorous. The radical form of constructivism applied to physical reality means that “we” shall never know for instance whether or not we are living in a computer simulation. It is a tiresome and annoying exercise (try to walk while being cynical about each step) in empty philosophizing and a futile attempt by someone who doesn’t understand to deny the right of anyone else to understand or get closer to understanding. Even if humans will never be able to understand everything, that’s because of our limitations rather than physical reality being somewhat questionable. A defeatist and nihilist approach to thinking and doing should be discouraged. It is just plain wrong to insist (and still be sane) that physical and/or societal principles and the Universal Constructor are whatever we want them to be.

This article will have two parallel story-lines in order to allow the reader to compare strengths and weaknesses of different approaches and what the author has to say about it. The author is first and foremost interested in understanding the truth and open to critique (it would be tiresome to read every sentence beginning with “In my opinion…”).

Wednesday July 12, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:00

3159 A Study on the Career Choice of Late Adolescents in Republic of Korea
The purpose of this study is to investigate factors influencing the career choices of Korean youths in late adolescence. The data for this study came from the youth panel (YP2007) of the Korea Employment Information Office. SPSS (WIN) 21.0 was used for the analysis of data. Binary logistic regression analysis identified variables influencing career choice, and causality was examined. Among the respondents, 36.1% had career choices and 63.9% did not. In order to verify the research hypothesis, career development, negative self-esteem, job level, positive self-esteem, job level, daily stress (current), stress during daily life (past 3 years), mother's final educational background, the household's total earning income, participation in career guidance and counseling, and 14-year-old residence location served as independent variables. Analysis of the data established that career development and daily life stress (current) affected results negatively. Positive self - esteem and job level, daily life stress (past 3 years), career guidance and counseling participation, The fact that residents of Seoul, Busan and Jeonbuk proved to have a static effect.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

Break / Networking
Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:00 - 16:30

16:00

3014 Critical Systems Thinking and Engaged Community Operations Research in Action: An Application to Promote Peace Among Urban and Rural Communities
The relationship between systems thinking and Community Operational Research (COR) has been controversial. This paper shows how the simultaneous use of systems thinking and COR can be used to learn across research community boundaries in order to improve the lives and collaboration among people of marginalized communities. It has been argued that COR’s practice has a common concern: the meaningful engagement of one or more communities. Moreover, it has been pointed out that COR practitioners have been concerned with generating social improvement as well as designing new methodologies, methods, techniques and processes of engagement. In this paper we describe a research inquiry guided by critical systems thinking and COR in which members from different local and marginalized communities, collaborating with external researchers, conceived and developed a peace program that has been implemented in hundreds of schools and more than thirty cities, and that has affected the lives of the families and communities in which it has operated. This research program has fostered a culture of peace in social contexts in which cultures of violence used to prevail. The paper presents qualitative as well as quantitative evidence of the impact of the research inquiry. We show that the key elements to achieve these results have been the engagement of local communities and the use of critical systems thinking. The communities have participated in the understanding of the problematic situations to be addressed, as well as in the conception and design of alternatives to create meaningful improvements in these situations. This intervention has taken advantage of diverse systemic problem structuring methods (interactive planning, soft systems methodology, causal loop diagramming, etc.) and has used critical systems thinking, boundary critique, and critical systems heuristics. The combination of these methodologies and methods has allowed marginalized groups to express their ideas in safe and constructive environments. The continuous use of boundary critique during 14 years has allowed the communities to redefine the peace program several times, to question our understanding of what we mean by an engaged community, to increase people's participation, to address the complexity of the problematic situations, and to prevent less than fully responsible actions in these situations. The paper shows how the use of critical systems thinking and engaged COR can prevent some ethical research problems such as researchers' self-deception, groupthink, ignoring vital information, giving too much importance to the participants' self-interests, interpreting situations from inaccurate and narrow perspectives, and uncritical deference to authority.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3076 The Provide-Pickup Paradigm: The Cornerstone in a General Systems Framework for Agency and Governance in Social Systems
In spite of significant advances in technology in today’s world, our large social systems—workplaces, schools, and more—are marked by increasing social decline. Organization practices typically have conflicting approaches of two camps—top-down directive versus bottom-up participatory. A new unifying paradigm is needed. The aim of this paper is to uncover, understand, unify and clarify the laws of human social systems, as we have done with the laws of material and mechanical systems. Illustrations, examples, and metaphors serve the goal of being accessible to a wide audience from a variety of disciplines, academic and lay. The development of the paper is a narrative path analysis. The path begins with large social system outcomes as the unit of focus, links it with general systems theory—Boulding’s nine-level typology of system complexity and skeleton of science —then adds specifics from a wider knowledge base drawing key concepts, literature, and evidence from instruction, management, control systems engineering, psychology, adult learning theory, plus examples from large urban schools and workplaces. The root causes of organization learning and behaviour are located within the individual system member (individual as unit of focus), and a great shift becomes evident. Namely, in mechanical systems, behavior is determined by exteriorly prescribed criteria, controlled by outside forces, including a leader, engineer or scientist. In human systems, behavior is determined by interiorly prescribed criteria, inside each learner or worker. The narrative path then ascends toward the large social system, identifying new corresponding concepts, principles and practices—from the individual system member as unit of focus, to the pair, to the small social system, and then the large or multisite social system. At the level of the individual, the CAP (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) principle is identified, that is: every system member, leader and worker, learns and performs according to his/her own willingness (affective) and ability (cognitive and psychomotor). Updated theory, at the pair level of focus, is that agency of organization learning and behaviour is not in the leader, nor the worker, but in both, thus unifying the conflicting directive and participatory camps. A new PROVIDE-PICKUP paradigm is proposed as the cornerstone of this new framework. The leader’s role is to PROVIDE input, resources and tasks; the learner/worker role is PICKUP of input, each at his/her own rate. TPO Theory (Things, People, Outcomes) is offered for predictability, stating that: In ineffective social systems, decision makers select, design, arrange, distribute, and provide their THINGS (input, resources, and tasks) without regard for their PEOPLE’S needs, abilities, perceptions, choices, and learning rates, resulting in ever-increasing negative OUTCOMES. In contrast: In effective social systems, decision makers select, design, arrange, display, distribute, and provide their THINGS explicitly to allow their PEOPLE to pick up and work according to interiorly prescribed needs and goals, abilities, perceptions, and choices, each at his or her own pace, resulting in increasingly positive OUTCOMES. Back at the level of the large social system as the unit of focus, important input is beyond the pickup range of individuals—that is beyond their [1] awareness and understanding (cognitive span), [2] concern and care (affective span), and [3] physical control (psychomotor span). The concept of span-of-control in management theory is supplemented or replaced by span-of-pickup. User-designed ideal-based automated social control systems are proposed to allow organizations and system members to flourish. Finally, the rICE methodology proposes three necessary sufficient conditions for social system designers and management to consider: organization inputs and processes are most effective when they are inclusive, continuing, and emancipatory (ICE). Further, specifics of these conditions are relative (r) to each group of users.


Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3082 Emerging Properties of the Fueguinian Industrial Technological Sector
The Province of Tierra del Fuego (Argentina) is an island with a legislation that has been promoting the industrial production for the last forty years. These situation has been generating diverse impacts in the social and economic order through the creation of employment, production for domestic consumption and exportation of that production to the continental zone of the country. Also, these effects were impacted or has been a consequence of national policies, economic development at national and international level. The present work is part of a bigger research which aim is to produce information about the fueguinian business structure, taking as an exponent the organizations of the technological industrial sector of the island.

The methodology of the present study is based on the consideration of the accounting information systems of each of the companies and, based on the overall analysis, seeks to deepen the information about this productive sector, highlighting the magnitudes and relations between capitals (understood as a source of financing for companies). For the recollecting data stage, a model called "Capital Relationships Map" has been designed to show some of these characteristics.

This analysis of relations allows us to consider the level of diversity as a property of capital, which is destined to the production of technological goods in the special customs area (Tierra del Fuego), and seeks to recognize sensitive elements that can cause a great impact changes to the local environment, resulting from this network of complex relationships.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:00 - 16:30

16:00

3135 Proposal of a Capability Maturity Model for Health and Productivity Management


1. Background

Currently, as society progresses, it faces a challenge of increased social security expenses. It is important for companies to promote health, in order to suppress the growth of social security expenses. Considering this, the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry initiated the “Health and Productivity Management Stock Selection” and the “Certified Health and Productivity Management Organization Recognition Program.” However, as health and productivity management (HPM) is a relatively new perspective, individuals within a company, who are responsible for HPM, are struggling to identify the problems to design and conduct HPM activities.

2. Proposal

We propose the following two items. The first is a capability maturity model for health and productivity management (CMM-HPM) and the second is a guideline to utilize the CMM-HPM in accordance with the objectives.

2-1 Development of the CMM-HPM

The purpose of this research is to establish a system that enables business managers in charge of HPM to comprehend the overall picture, clarify issues, make specific efforts, and improve HPM activities.

In order to realize the above purpose, we extracted 19 evaluation criteria, based on the “HPM superior corporation certification” announced by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry.

We defined the criteria of each level as follows:

Level 1 is the “Initial Level” in which the HPM activities are not performed or are performed temporarily. There is no evidence to confirm that these activities were continuously conducted. Level 2 is the “Managed Level” in which a specific person leads the HPM activities. These activities can continue as long as the specific person remains in the respective position. However, there is no evidence to confirm that these activities would be continuously conducted after the person moves to another position. Level 3 is the “Defined Level” in which the activities are defined in the company rules and/or processes. These activities are expected to be continuously conducted, considering that the rules and/or processes do not change. Level 4 is the “Quantitatively Managed Level” in which the performance of the activities is measured and managed, based on the measured data. Level 5 is the “Optimizing Level” in which processes or activities can be improved, based on the analysis of the measured data.

In order to develop the CMM-HPM, we divided the 19 evaluation items into five levels.

2-2 Developing guidelines to utilize the CMM-HPM

Using the CMM-HPM, it is possible to identify the current status of HPM activities. However, it is not easy to decide the starting point of the 19 evaluation items of the CMM-HPM. Therefore, we developed guidelines that state the starting point of the CMM-HPM, according to the purpose of the HPM.

As a result of analyzing the companies that conducted HPM, it was identified that there are three major patterns of HPM objectives. The three patterns are “improving productivity,” “creating a safe workplace,” and “matching with the business.”

We conducted a system analysis for each objective and created causal-loops. Moreover, in order to meet the research objective, we developed guidelines to identify the most appropriate item of CMM-HPM to commence from, for the efficiency of the activities.

3. Evaluation

The validity of the CMM-HPM and the guidelines were evaluated for 41 companies.

The 41 companies evaluated are selected from companies listed in the “Health and Productivity Stock Selection”, examples of efficiently conducting HPM in previous research, and the “Corporate Case Study on HPM Activities” by the Japan Economic Organization Federation.

The results confirm the validity of the CMM-HPM and the guidelines.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

(By Invitation Only) WORKSHOP: PART II: Joint workshop with the Austrian Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology on Smart Cities Research
Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan


Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:00 - 18:00
Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Sciences Paulanergasse 13, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

WORKSHOP: Health Systems - Continuing Morning Plenary and Panel Discussions

Dexhelpp –Decision Support for Health Policy: Methods, Models and Technologies based on Existing Health Care Data to Support the Analysis, Planning and Controlling of the Health Care System

Niki Popper & Dexhelpp Team Members


National health systems invest annually more billions of Euros (or Dollars). While the demand for health services increases (as a result of demographic change), the resources are limited. This creates a need for the development of new methods, models and technologies in order to support the analysing, planning and controlling of health care systems. Up to now decision support in health care systems is mainly based on the evidence of studies, that have a smaller range and not on the analysis of big data sets. But quantity and quality of available data strongly increases and therefore facilitates the description and analysis of all areas in health care systems.

To provide state of the art Health Technology Assessment (HTA), Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) we will need to combine health system domain knowledge, knowledge of professional data processes and – last but not least – mathematical modelling & simulation skills. The areas of data security & data management, big data analysis, machine and deep learning, statistical methods, mathematical modelling & simulation and visualisation as well as public health & decision analytics modelling should help us to transform Big Data into Deep Data: evidence based, reproducible knowledge.

To bring together all technologies still is a huge challenge. Data Based Demographic models have to be combined with analysis and models for the spreading of diseases. Time dependent treatment paths have to be parametrized with data sets from clinical routine joined with large scale health system data. From the system simulation point of view an important aspect is the possibility to implement changes inside the system, like interventions inside the computer model, and to analyse their effects. N. Popper tries to point out how big interdisciplinary teams will handle the complex processes in the future and which methods are and aren’t promising.

Nikolas Popper (Director DEXHELPP – Decision Support for Health Policy and Planning, Vienna; Coordinator Centre for Computational Complex Systems, TU Wien; CSO dwh GmbH – Simulation Services and Technical Solutions, Vienna)


Chairs
avatar for Prof. Dr. Dr. Dr. Felix Tretter

Prof. Dr. Dr. Dr. Felix Tretter

Fellow, Bertalanffy Centre for the Studies of Systems Sciences (BCSSS)
SIG Co-Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems (see below for details)This SIG Socio-Ecological Systems intends to help advance a sound epistemology and methodology for socio-ecological systems design in conjunction with socio-technological systems design. At the interface of science... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Dr. Niki Popper

Dr. Niki Popper

Chairman, DEXHELPP
Nikolas “Niki” Popper studied Mathematics, Philosophy and Jazz Theory in Vienna, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain) and Moscow, Idaho (US) and received his ScD (Dr.techn.) at TU Wien. Niki Popper published and presented about 150 articles and talks in journals and at international... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:00 - 18:00
6th Floor, Kontaktraum, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

WORKSHOP 3183 Six Degrees of Bertalanffy or Social Media for Scholars
Our systems for learning, for working, for relationships, for communicating, for finding and disseminating information, for research, and more, are being rewoven through social media platforms and networks. Academic institutions and funding agencies not only demand that scholars publish, but also demand evidence from citation metrics that others are reading and citing the work. The demand that academics both publish and demonstrate impact is a conundrum amidst the increasing “digital deluge” (Boon, 2016).
The case for using social media to reference, discuss, and promote your research, and for connecting with others, is research driven (McKenzie & Ozler, 2011; Mollett, Brumley, Gilson, & Williams, 2017). At the same time, there is a need for scholars to critically examine social media tools, use, and the impacts on academia, learning, institutional behaviors, and society. This workshop offers a hands on introduction to social media, its relevance to academic work, critical digital & media literacy skills, and how you can make choices about how, and in what ways to develop your social media presence.
This is an interactive digital workshop to show you how to use social media to multiply your presence and digital presence on the internet, engage the networks, explore how you can monitor systemic flows across the social networks, and how the ‘real’ world activity flows and energy links to the social virtual and back again. We will also be introducing new forms of journalism (citizen, deep, constructive, solutions), upcoming trends in media, social media, virtual reality & augmented reality technology and what it may mean for you. Learn how to stop ‘pushing’ and start ‘pulling’; relationship building online and offline; social media etiquette… yes, there is an etiquette.
The goal of this workshop is for participants to be able to use and understand the now and future of social technologies in academia, business and society to connect and collaborate with other researchers, to disseminate their research and to manage their public profile, to extend systemic thinking and research into society; to expand the ISSS professional, academic, and practitioner networks.

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →
avatar for Kendra Rosencrans

Kendra Rosencrans

Saybrook University
Kendra Rosencrans is a Ph.D. candidate in Organizational Systems at Saybrook University. She is the co-editor of a special issue of the Journal of Organizational Transformation and Social Change featuring articles from the ISSS 2016 conference. She has a master's degree in science... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:00 - 18:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 124, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3024 Developing a Systemic Evaluation Methodology: an Approach Towards Social Program Evaluation
Evaluation is commonly seen as a systematic process to determine merit, worth, value or significance. When engaging in program evaluation, evaluators use research methods to systematically investigate the effectiveness of social intervention programs adapted to the political and organizational environment surrounding them. However, aside from having a systematic character, evaluation has at its core a systemic and a critical character as well, as it is based on the establishment of judgments and the inclusion of stakeholders, both of which inevitably affect what will be seen as an improvement. Critical in terms of not taking for granted predefined assumptions about the evaluation and systemic in terms of a dynamic attitude towards the establishment of what and who should be considered in the evaluation and the acknowledgment the existing relationships of those involved in the evaluation. Thus, the systems theory of boundary critique (about how to explore value and boundary judgements) is relevant. For this reason, we seek to propose a methodological development for conducting social program evaluations. Our methodological proposal, seeks to contribute at a theoretical and a practical level as we not only seek to present a methodology that can be widely applied in the realm of social program evaluation through a practical case but we also seek to contribute to enriching the literature that links systems thinking practice and evaluation, focusing primarily in the contributions that critical systems thinking can make to the practice of evaluation. We examine different stages of the evaluation process and show how boundary critique can be used in each one. A practical example will be provided of an evaluation of a program for teaching alternative conflict resolution techniques to children in vulnerable areas of Bogota, Colombia.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3090 From Hierarchies to Networks: Changes in Organisation of Public Service Delivery
Government services slowly enter new and promising era. The traditional way of organising public sector service delivery in western democracies is hierarchical. Hierarchical organisation means functional specialisation. Top layers of the hierarchy specify and specialise different parts of the hierarchy in the bottom to provide rather specific functions – services. Service provision is then fragmented. Citizen in need of long-term help often ends up using many services with low cooperation between them. These conditions lead to high costs and low quality. We currently can identify in Europe promising cases of institution which are organised as network organisations and sometimes even changed their structures from hierarchal type with great success. In this paper, we discuss what drives hierarchical organisation ineffectiveness when supporting people suffering with complex problems and what are some of the crucial conditions to organise successful network based integrated services. There are four principles discussed that are common to successful network organisations which are very different from the principles of hierarchically organised institutions – holistic service provision, flat organisation structure, high trust and capability measurement. These principles are shown on three cases - Jeugdbescherming Regio Amsterdam (aka Child Protect, Netherlands), Karolinska University Hospital (Sweden) and Buurtzorg (health and social services, Netherlands).

Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:30 - 17:00

16:30

3166 Proposal of Visualising Model of Customer Demands Sufficiency Degree in Designing Private Life Insurance
Since May 2016, customer demands confirmation at the time of insurance solicitation was strengthened by the Japanese Financial Services Agency (FSA). It requires not only confirming what customer is requiring but also to realize what is required though the insurance plan proposal. To realize this, insurance company must firstly understand their customer’s needs then secondly need to show how the it can be realized though insurance plan proposed as well as how it matches with their own needs. This means both customer needs and the matches between customer intention and the proposal must by visualized. The visualisation can be realized by using three-dimensional model which has time, space and products axes. These three axes represent the elements of insurance products, which time represents 'when' insured will deserves the benefits and space represents 'for what' insured will deserves as the benefit. The customers expectation to insurance, in other words, is to clarify the function which customer are expecting out of entire functions of insurance. That is, clarifying which function of insurance is required by customer means that customer demands of insurance is identified. Therefore, the three-dimensional model can be used to visualize both what insurance can do and also the customer demands itself.

This paper aims to propose a visualised three-dimensional model which represents the structure, essence and the concept of insurance. The three-dimensional model is a model which enables the visualization of sufficiency degree of customer demands that are considered to be invisible in most of the cases. Each axes of three-dimension represents the function of life insurance. The visualising model of customer demand sufficiency degree enables to comprehends the function of insurance in public social security, private life/non-life insurance and customer demands point of view. Through the process of understanding insurance as a system using this model, people will understand how can insurance support their financial risk and find out what they should and should not expect for private life insurance product.

Through the result of workshop and the interviews to the professionals and the specialist of life insurance as for an evaluation of the model, it was proved that the model helped understanding the features and function of life insurance and participants could know their needs of insurance. And, also, they had the impression that life insurance is something valuable and will benefit for future financial risks.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3179 Pattern Literacy in Support of Systems Literacy: Learning to Find the Patterns and Create the Models That Represent Systems in Words and Pictures
This session, part of the Designing Educational Systems SIG, follows up on Peter Tuddenham’s work on Systems Literacy, and on Helene Finidori’s inquiry on the role of patterns and pattern languages in bridging the fragmentation of systemic knowledge and approaches, and learning about systems. The purpose of this work is to co-explore the connection between systems knowledge representation, its embodiment and the systemic phenomena we wish to learn how to make sense of and to anticipate, using patterns as boundary objects and connectors.

At the ISSS Annual Meeting and Conference in Boulder in 2016 during a plenary session on Systems Literacy that referenced his previous work on Ocean Literacy, the presenter Peter Tuddenham asked the participants to take a 4x6 card and to either 1. Draw a System and or 2. Draw symbols to represent essential principles or big ideas (of Systems). A total of 34 Cards were handed in at the end of the plenary. The 4x6 cards were a blank space upon which different interpretations of the question were made explicit. The authors of this paper have reviewed the submitted cards and examined them for patterns and also to develop categories of responses.

This session will present the results. The implications for the representation of “Systems Literacy” will be explored, both in terms of words, and also in terms of symbols and drawings. In the light of the above, we will examine the question of deriving and formulating shared cross cutting patterns.

The process itself will be examined as a way to create a continuous development of “Systems Literacy” in complement of the quest for a General Systems Theory.

In particular, we will examine the critical role of patterns and pattern languages in embodied cognition, and we will look into how the development of a pattern literacy can reveal essential in support of systems literacy. The ultimate goal is to reflect upon how the capacity for humans to discover, record, retrieve, embody, use or design of systemic patterns can be enhanced.

A workshop session will be connected to the paper presentation. Before this session starts participants will be asked the same questions and asked to complete 4x6 cards. Their responses will be compared and contrasted with the 2016 results.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3009 An Attempt to Epistemologically Ground Current Psychotherapy. Neither Between Nor Within: On the Eigenform and Viability of Human Complex Systems.
In the last 15 years, psychotherapy has progressively faced with the ambition of reshaping foundative concepts and best practices. This trend seems to be coherent with the need for a theoretical integration psychotherapists are looking for, so as to epistemologically ground their discipline. From a constructivist perspective, two major biases seem to arise: (i) the paradox of seeking for a new framework through an old one (e.g. person-centered interventions within almost-reductionist models); (ii) the tendency not to question the superordinate assumptions of all the different topics (e.g. old-fashioned realism). The paper is mainly based on Heinz von Foerster’s eigenform, Ernst von Glasersfeld’s viability and Ludwig von Bertalanffy’s general systems model and on the interconnection of these concepts with modern and contemporary psychotherapy from a
The present paper is devoted to describe a tentative framework that may foster the convergence on a superordinate epistemology and so a theoretical integration of psychotherapy. I claim that second-order cybernetics and radical constructivism offer an effective methodology in advancing psychotherapy, and that in turn psychotherapy is trying to absorb a few assumptions of this methodology. I also claim that complex system point of view may support the overcoming of ineffective dichotomies between personal and social psychology, normality and psychopathology, and so promoting a superordinate comprehension of human experience.
I first analyze the intertwined paths of Foerster’s eigenform and Glasersfeld’s viability through the lens of modern psychology and general systems theory. Subsequently, I define a theoretical model aimed to integrate this analysis and epistemologically ground psychotherapy. Finally, I describe the implications of such a framework in identifying, interconnecting and applying relevant threads in clinical practice.
The concepts of eigenform and viability lead to a versatile methodology in anticipating constraints and possibilities of human experience. I describe five foundative processes mainly based on the contiguousness and continuousness of observing systems, and on the epistemological irreversibility of life. I interconnect these processes with five recurrent dimensions of clinical psychology. These dimensions are discussed and defined as three epistemological principles and two transformational principles:
1. Systemic Emergence: the first epistemological principle tries to argue that from a theoretical point of view a system is the comergence of its observing processes, and from a clinical point of view human actively pursue a viable pattern of self-organization.
2. Fluctuational Continuousness: the second epistemological principle tries to argue that from a theoretical point of view a system is always a node, a relation, and a network, and from a clinical point of view social experience is a self-organizing source of individuation.
3. Autopoietic Contiguousness: the third epistemological principle tries to argue that from a theoretical point of view a system is the entanglement of selfhood and otherness, and from a clinical point of view personal experience is a structurally coupled embodied action.
4. Constructive Irreversibility: the first transformational principle tries to argue that from a theoretical point of view observing processes are non-balanced and irreversible, and from a clinical point of view experiencing is a dissipative and irreversible process.
5. Constraining Imbrication: transformational principle tries to argue that from a theoretical point of view observing events are locally collapsed and context-dependent, and from a clinical point of view agency is defined by informational closure and punctuation.

The thesis contributes to the complex systems research programme, by demonstrating its effectiveness in fostering psychotherapeutic integration. Although this is not the first attempt in doing this, it extensively debates and integrates the most of the recent clinical advances.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3049 From 'Systematic' to 'Systemic' Research and Policy Analysis – Progressing the Application of Systems Approaches to Policy Evaluations at a European Union Research Agency (Eurofound)
This study explores the relevance and applicability of using systems approaches to enhance policy evaluation projects conducted by Eurofound(European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions) aa an exploratory case study in 'action research' mode.

This European Union (EU) agency is mandated to support European policymakers in their endeavours to improve the working and living conditions in Europe, by providing “scientifically sound and unbiased, high quality information” .

The key question of this exploration was: How can evaluation of relevant policies be accomplished as part of Eurofound’s role, and give justice to the complexities of the policies assessed and multiple perspectives and stakes involved?

The overall aim of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of current approaches and methods in policy evaluation activities of complex social policies and phenomena undertaken by Eurofound, and to test the ‘systemic desirability and cultural feasibility’ (Checkland, 1990) of moving beyond a ‘first-order science’ research tradition within Eurofound to advance opportunities for applying systems concepts and approaches in these activities.

Methodology

The action research consisted in a specially designed systemic enquiry designed by the author, and conducted jointly with research staff of the agency as they engaged in the implementation of Eurofound policy analysis (research) project consisting of a series of analyses and workshops using different systems approaches (elements of SSM and CSH). This systemic enquiry was applied to a selected case study: a then current Eurofound research project ‘Delivering public services: a greater role for the private sector? Hospital services’ (Eurofound, 2015a, p. 39). This project aimed to analyse the ‘implications of privatisation for access, quality and effectiveness of services’ in the hospital sector across EU Member States. This situation features a number of ‘complex’ characteristics. To test the usefulness and applicability of selected systems approaches was the aim of the action research implemented in this case study.

Conclusions

The experience from this action research applied to the ‘hospital services’ case has shown that the standard approach is not always sufficient for a deeper understanding of a situation to be researched at the start of a project, and can usefully be complemented and enhanced by systems approaches.

The experience and validation interviews with researchers in Eurofound suggested that there could be real value for research and policy evaluation projects in Eurofound to embed systemic inquiry streams into the overall project design, under some conditions:

For projects with wide and fuzzy scope (boundary explorations to inform research questions);
Where new territory is explored (exploratory social learning and scoping);
In complex policy situations with diverse and multiple stakeholders (interrelationships and multiple perspectives).
Whilst it would be ‘systemically desirable’ to broaden a systemic approach to researching similar policies with shared characteristics, there are institutional barriers to the ‘cultural feasibility’, as the mainstream way of conducting research continues to dominate and imposes important constraints to such opportunities. These consist in short research project cycle times, and pressures to deliver results fast, leaving little time and scope for reflexivity and exploratory methods. Additionally, introducing systems approaches into policy evaluation projects exposes paradigmatic and epistemic tensions. The default way of doing research and evaluation projects ‘systematically’ sits uncomfortably with systemic approaches, which implicitly challenge the conventional way of framing and approaching research inquiries. This experience resonates with Argyris’ and Schön’s ‘theory of action’, in which there is a gap between a ‘theory in use’ (the ‘normal’ ways things are done in organisations) compared to ‘espoused theory’ (what is claimed to be done in rhetoric), (Argyris and Schön (1974, 1978, 1996), Argyris (1990). What Eurofound states in its work programme is one thing (‘to assess policies and practices’) (‘espoused theory’), however, in practice it currently falls short of this ambition, as the standard approaches for normal research projects continue to be used (for example standard case study methodology).

In order to move forward from this, a ‘shift’ will be needed. As suggested by Argyris and Schön, this calls for ‘double-loop’ learning to bring about transformational change in the organisational and academic culture in research organisations like Eurofound, and to dissolve the contradictions and ‘organisational defensive routines’. This will require time, and finding and engaging further ‘allies’ across the organisation to pursue this aim. Opportunities exist at several levels:

Transfer the experiences from the ‘hospital services’ project to other projects and researchers, through internal conversations about these experiences.
Raise this discussion in the ‘official discourse’ in the organisation, to increase interest in ‘reflexivity’ and give it legitimacy within the ‘projectified world’ of the organisation.
Future research methodology developments might provide space to enhance the methodological frameworks of the agency.
Further explorations could be conducted within the context of agencies' networks, to explore further how systemic approaches could be used by other agencies to enhance their scientific processes for policy areas with systemic and complex characteristics, such as inter-relationships, multiple perspectives and boundary judgements.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3105 Strategic Alliances Between Independent Participants
Globally, digital solutions are gaining prominence and their prevalence and proliferation is evident by the rate of adoption by the masses. Organizations in government, civil, commercial and business domains are increasingly adopting digital to reach out to customers and impact them in ways that were not possible earlier. Digital technologies are far more pervasive now and their mass adoption has enabled information generation, and application in the form of information technology in different areas. The corner stone of digital technologies has been the creation, manipulation, and enhancement of meaningful information which significantly change the way organizations engage with their customers.
Presently, there are practices, approaches, methods, life-cycle processes, frameworks, methodologies that help organizations in synthesizing, evaluating and implementing digital technologies in their respective areas of business. There are model based engineering and architecting approaches that have been found to be useful in computer-aided-generation of software systems from an expression of corresponding models. In all these situations, what comes to the fore is that most of the available approaches, follow the notion of “How to” do things rather than “why” it should be done, “what” should really be done” and “when” it should be done. This is further evident when we see that solutions in one area of application are not found to be useful in other areas. In other words, the digital solution patterns are useful for only one instance and are not useful for further instantiations.
There are different schools of thought with regard to digital technologies and how businesses can utilize them. Gartner is of the view that the nexus of forces (Cloud, Mobile, Social, and Information) are the driving factors for digital technologies and related business. TCS is of the view that the digital five forces (Cloud, Big Data, Social, Mobility, and Robotics & Artificial intelligence) are the driving factors for digital technologies and related business. HBR is of the view that smart, connected, miniaturized devices (Internet of Things) are the driving force of digital technologies and related businesses. One thing that is evident from these views is that, all of them speak about the constituent parts but they do not say clearly: a) Why should these parts exists? b) Are these parts sufficient? c) How to put these parts together to form a whole? d) When should these parts be used? e) What is the evolution path of these parts? f) What could be evolution path of the whole? g) What is the underlying systems model for digital based solutions?
This paper is an attempt to articulate the digital journey, the different levels of discourse in the digital journey and the possible evolution of the digital technologies to address the contextual knowledge needs of the human civilization. As an exemplar, the digital journey of supporting customer experiences design using digital technologies is taken up and illustrated in this paper.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 17:00 - 17:30

17:00

3160 Modes of Analogy 'What Human Cognitive Abilities Capture Structures from the World?'
Every new things and ideas involve any inventions inside. If people attempts to elucidate those creative abilities to make them being enable, there would be one question that people could come up with. “What human cognitive abilities capture as structures from the world?” Structualisme gave an answer to this problem through Metonymy and Metaphor. Recently those questions are relocated in analogies. However those solutions have not been reached out to concise suggestions to apply analogies to several fields in practical way due to be unclear and uncomfortable to utilize them.

Analogies are generally described in these three; proportional analogies, predictive analogies and analogical problem solving in existing research on analogies. These classifications are fit to comparing results which are available to observe from outside as data, but not good enough for analogies generation processes which are ways to know human cognitive effect. By current general cognitive processes of analogies, it begins with source domain and target domain to get analogy. Then there are key effects in middle of analogies processes; retrieval, mapping and transfer. In order to make the capacity for putting analogies to practical use, it should be considered to refine the works on some key elements on cognitive processes such like memories, abstraction and transfer. To those problems, this study has been approached to make an addition to types of memory by Larry Squire with ‘memory of image’ as the third memory. Therefore, in this study it is considered that most of metaphors are utilized to understand things to make them outstanding, and metonymy refers to describe things through part-whole relation. In addition, it is concerned that synecdoche based on concept hierarchy is also a class metonymy. It attempts to formulate analogies for analogies research by categorizing analogies as working modes to find out relations. Considering these points, this paper provides 5 types of analogies modes in the categories of metonymical and metaphorical at first, then 3 types of analogies modes which could be located in new categories between metonymy and metaphor to give an answer to “What human cognitive abilities capture as structures from the world?”

The previous study of analogies generation processes in human cognitive science has been adopted in this study to make processes more clear. In evaluating modes of analogy, ‘transfer’ which is a key element on analogies processes should be also refined. For this problem, this paper gives an attention to what things make relations on each domains; source and target. Then this paper gives two classifications to show features of relations between source and Target domains. Also, this paper provides one more kind of classification to know features from modes of analogy. According to features of existing analogies, modes of analogy could be divided in case-based analogies and no case-based analogies. Through these framings, this study found that some modes of analogy could be considered that they displays more creativity on the analogies generation processes than other modes of analogy.

As a result of this achievement, this study found one unique way to capture structures by human cognitive besides metonymical and metaphorical ways. It shows relations even there is no common axis to link between things. Some part of this field were mentioned in philosophy as ‘strength’. It means human cognitive captures structures in infinity, and this is before representations. This field will be discussed in future work.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3031 Green Decision Making: Sustainable Transport and Systemic Planning (SP)
The generic framework for planning and decision support set out in this paper is the outcome of the research work carried out in recent years in the international research project SUSTAIN concerning national sustainable transport planning. In the paper focus is on sustainable transport and infrastructure assessment and on the methodology and process of systemic planning (SP).

SP theory development has interchanged with practical application and testing of the SP approach in a large number of cases. The word systemic in SP indicates that complex planning problems and provision of decision support in today’s strategic planning needs a focus on what may be addressed as systemic insights in balance with more conventional, systematically-based findings where causal linkages can be modelled and made use of. In practice this means that SP is based on a study-specific combination of hard (quantitative) and soft (qualitative) operations research (OR) methods; especially the latter have a function as regards knowledge generation that relates to obtaining systemic insights. Furthermore, SP applies a process that drives group-based learning forward. The group should be formed with the different stakeholder interests as regards the outcome represented by different group members. The process is guided by a facilitator and is assisted by an analyst, with the analyst providing ongoing, interactive modelling. This collective (man/machine) learning aims to lead to a final decision (or decision recommendation) about the best alternative or course of action for the actual strategic planning problem. The flexibility of SP makes it adaptable to different problem types.

The paper is disposed as follows: After the Introduction about green decision making, Section 2 presents five SP-perspectives, where each perspective is grounded in a particular research approach that serves a particular function in the SP framework. The following Section 3 describes the SP modelling toolbox consisting of 2 x 7 soft and hard OR methods. Based on the previous sections, Section 4 describes the ‘SP-wheel’, which is the process-driver behind an iterative group-based learning cycle, intended to provide decision support for the actual decision making. The SP-wheel consists of 8 steps which produce knowledge that is intended to accumulate as final decision support. In the following Section 5 findings from a number of conducted case studies are applied to illuminate various aspects of the individual steps in the SP-wheel. A final Section 6 presents findings and perspective.

A more comprehensive treatment of the SP framework presented in the paper and the ideas behind the framework is available as a free E-book download from the author’s ResearchGate page: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Steen_Leleur GREEN DECISION MAKING – How Systemic Planning can support Strategic Decision Making for Sustainable Transport Development, Tech. Univ. of Denmark, Department of Management Engineering, April 2017.

Wednesday July 12, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

17:30

3244 Paying Attention to the Emotions in the Processes of Change using the VSM
The Beer´s Viable System Model (VSM) is a powerful tool for studying organizations as cohesive “wholes” and for evaluating their strategies counter to the complexity of the tasks they must perform. Primarily, it is a tool to diagnose the effectiveness of the structure of the organization, and offers a conceptual model of the information system to the management. It also allows assessing the consequences of organizations' policies.

Social and human actors are not trivial, they pursue ideals, ends, objectives, and have preferences and values, all of which may change. To model that, there are three dimensions to take in account: activities, structure and behavior.

The last dimension mentioned above, behavior, can be of interest at distinct levels: individuals, teams, organizational units, a whole organization, networks, etc. But a mere arrangement and the relationship with behaviors. And when took about behaviors, it´s necessary took about emotions, perceptions and cognition.

The VSM has been adopted by several researchers and practitioners for diagnosing organizational performance, and/or for (re)structuring organizations based on the factors essential and adequate for its long-term viability. In this paper, the scope is to design or change companies to assess and take responsibility for the company's effects on environmental and social wellbeing

Wednesday July 12, 2017 17:30 - 18:00

18:00

Dinner available at nearby local restaurants
Wednesday July 12, 2017 18:00 - 20:00
Local Restaurants 1040 Wien, Austria

18:15

ISSS COUNCIL MEETING: SIG CHAIRS, BOARD & PAST PRESIDENTS
Council Meeting for SIG Chairs, Board and Past Presidents.
Nibbles available.

Chairs
avatar for Dr. Jennifer Wilby

Dr. Jennifer Wilby

Vice President Admin, ISSS
In 1978 Wilby started working in urban planning, followed by database programming and textbook publishing. From 1994-97 she worked as a Research Assistant in the Centre for Systems Studies at the University of Hull and then from 1997-99 at the University of Lincoln. From 1999 to 2004... Read More →

Wednesday July 12, 2017 18:15 - 19:15
6th Floor, Kontaktraum, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

19:30

A Night with Nora Bateson
Speakers
avatar for Nora Bateson

Nora Bateson

Founder, The International Bateson Institute
Nora Bateson is a media producer and educator. Her work includes documentaries, multimedia productions, magazine columns, and developing curriculum for elementary and high school students. Central to all her pursuits is the idea of utilizing media and storytelling to encourage cultural... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Dr. Alexander Laszlo

Dr. Alexander Laszlo

President, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
SIG Chair: Leadership and Systemic Innovation | The LaSI SIG focuses on the formal area of research related to the theme of systemic innovation. As a place where change leaders and change makers team up with systems scientists to co-create impactful innovations, it aims to catalyze... Read More →
avatar for Judith Rosen

Judith Rosen

CEO, Rosen Enterprises
SIG Co-Chair: Relational Science | | Judith Rosen is a writer, researcher, and artist who, through interaction with her father, the mathematial biologist Robert Rosen, has a comprehensive understanding of his scientific work. She traveled on numerous scientific trips with Robert... Read More →


Wednesday July 12, 2017 19:30 - 21:30
Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Sciences Paulanergasse 13, 1040 Wien, Austria
 
Thursday, July 13
 

07:15

#ISSS2017 Vienna Roundtable
Chairs
avatar for Susan Farr Gabriele

Susan Farr Gabriele

Educator, GEMS: Gabriele Educational Materials and Systems
SIG Chair: ISSS Round Table (see below) | | Susan Farr Gabriele, PhD, taught for twenty years in Los Angeles schools, including assignments as mentor teacher and department chair. Later, studying systems methods for education under Bela H. Banathy, she earned a PhD in human science... Read More →

Thursday July 13, 2017 07:15 - 08:30
Bertalanffy Centre for the Study of Systems Sciences Paulanergasse 13, 1040 Wien, Austria

08:00

Morning Registration Desk Open
Foyer

Thursday July 13, 2017 08:00 - 13:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

08:45

Day 4 Introduction: From Living in Smart Cities to Sustainable Agriculture & Environmental Ecology
ECO-SYSTEMS DAY

Systemic approaches aim to create flourishing ecosystems. The conference will showcase examples of innovative approaches to smart city strategies to tackle emission objectives, like urban mobility, with an outlook on autonomous systems and their social and ethical consequences.

We will explore further smart and connected systems as a future perspective of urban developments and citizenship living in interconnected cities, not only as consumers but also producers of resources. Our rural ecosystems will be influenced by climate-smart agriculture and sustainable agriculture. The increasing demand for food security and food logistics, in industrialized agriculture, as well as community farming, and their systemic impacts on social and environmental systems widens the scope of the conference in an additional dialogue of scientists and practitioners.


Thursday July 13, 2017 08:45 - 09:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:00

Keynote Practice: Mag. Dominic Weiss - '3137 Smart City Wien – a systemic solution in a systemic world'
Smart City Wien is a long-term initiative by the city of Vienna that looks at a cross-section of the city, covering all areas of life, work and leisure activities in equal measure, and includes everything from infrastructure, energy and mobility to all aspects of urban development.

Smart City Wien defines the development of a city that assigns priority to, and interlinks, the issues of energy, mobility, buildings and infrastructure. In this, the following premises apply: radical resource preservation, development and productive use of innovations/new technologies and high and socially balanced quality of life

Vienna’s Smart City strategy is characterised by both an internal effect to render existing plans even more ambitious and to inspire new ideas. At the same time, its external effect is to create an international frame of reference for what is happening here and to generate publicity for Vienna’s aims.

The time horizon of the framework strategy extends to 2050, since the necessary and often fundamental changes in the fields of energy, mobility or construction cannot happen overnight. The thematic arc stretches from the future of Vienna as a hub of research and business to the preservation of all-important social achievements. Concrete methods of application must still be developed in many areas – but the direction is clear: Vienna wants to pursue an integrated goal for its Smart City where everyone can benefit from synergy effects and continually team play.

It is the key goal of Smart City Wien for 2050 to offer optimum quality of life for all citizens - combined with the highest possible resource preservation. This can be achieved through a holistic approach, which is the beating heart of our city and also the reason, why the Smart City Wien is an important systemic solution in a systemic world where everything is connected.

Speakers
avatar for Mag. Dominic Weiss

Mag. Dominic Weiss

Public Affairs Manager, SMART City Vienna, TINA VIENNA
Dominic Weiss leads the Public Affairs Management Department of tina vienna UrbanTechnologies & Strategies GmbH, a strategic orientated department owned by the Cityof Vienna. In this position he is responsible for the coordination and management ofthe Smart City Agenda of the City... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 09:00 - 09:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:30

Keynote Science: 'Impact of Autonomous Vehicles on the Digital City of the Future'
Speakers
avatar for Ian Banerjee

Ian Banerjee

After growing up in Asia, Africa and Europe, Ian Banerjee he studied architecture and urban planning in Vienna. His Master’s thesis took him to the city of Curitiba, known as the ‘ecological capital’ of Brazil. It became such a life changing experience, that it led him to commit... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 09:30 - 10:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:00

Keynote Science: Dr. Robert Dyball
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Robert Dyball

Dr. Robert Dyball

Senior Lecturer, Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University (ANU)
Robert convenes the Human Ecology program in the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University. He is also visiting Professor at the College of Human Ecology, University of the Philippines Los Baños. His current research centres on the application... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 10:00 - 10:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:30

10:45

Break / Networking
Thursday July 13, 2017 10:45 - 11:15
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:15

Ecosystems Panel Session: Dr.-Ing. Christian Walloth, Thomas Fundneider, Prof. Dr. Ramesh Kumar Biswas, Prof. Ray Ison
"Smart" seems to be the buzzword of these years, following on "sustainable" and "resilient". Everything is smart, or should become smart, including our cities ("smart cities) and our workplaces (e.g., "smart work centers"). But what does a city or a workplace need to be "smart"?

Along with a certain commodization of the word "smart", its meaning has opened to include more than only technological solutions. A network of sensors and some computer intelligence alone won't make a city smart. Instead, e.g., "smart city" is now a catch-all term for a city that is being developed in an integrated way, combining aspects of technical infrastructure with administrative innovation, new approaches to leverage local economic and cultural developments, as well as esthetic and spatial design aspects.

Systems tools and methods can enable such integrated develoments of places on various scales – buildings, campuses and neighborhoods, urban quarters, entire cities and regions. A systems view may help to avoid misled developments and open the minds of decision-makers for future-proof strategies.

Many of our cities are at the crossroad now. Decision makers need to navigate a multitude of good-practice examples and fashions. Do we want to optimize our cities for tourists flying in for a weekend, contributing to the "eventization" of our cities? Are we going to insist on further extending the 20th-century model of public urban mass transportation using buses and tramways, while ignoring that the youth is dreaming of individualized (public) transportation and several companies are working on small flying vehicles? Are we going to leverage on the sharing economy or try to ban it (Uber, AirBnB)? Shall we help people to better interconnect in cities – or continue to put up hurdles to traffic flows and fostering slow modes of transportation such as cycling? And how do we account for moving the aging population – on bicycles? Will we allow for private space or are we going to foster endless "co-"ization – shared common spaces in residential buildings, all together in public mass transportation, all together in co-working spaces?

What do our systems approaches suggest? What is viable? – Are we stuck with the mechanical city of the 20th century (to which belongs, imho any purely technical sensor-computer optimized city), or are we finally going to make the leap to the "systems" city?

Speakers
avatar for Prof. Dr. Ramesh Kumar Biswas

Prof. Dr. Ramesh Kumar Biswas

MD and owner, ARK22 Austrian Urban Environmental Group and Biswas GmbH
Ramesh Kumar Biswas has degrees in architecture and urban design from Edinburgh and a doctorate in urban ecology from Graz. He has been a visiting professor in Paris, Tokyo, Sydney, Buenos Aires and Bogota. He has lectured in over 40 universities. His best-selling book, „Metropolis... Read More →
avatar for Professor Ockie Bosch

Professor Ockie Bosch

President, International Society for the Systems Sciences
Professor Ockie Bosch was born in Pretoria, South Africa. He first came to Australia in 1979 where he was an invited senior visiting scientist with the CSIRO in Alice Springs. After one year in Longreach (1989) he emigrated to New Zealand where he was offered a position with Landcare... Read More →
avatar for Thomas Fundneider

Thomas Fundneider

Founder and Managing Director, theLivingCore
Thomas is a landscape architect and holds an MBA in General Management. His wealth of experience is rooted in highly diverse multi-stakeholder projects and his focus on the decisive details that often make the difference for the whole is extremely valuable for our clients. Thomas... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU)
ISSS Past President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing... Read More →
avatar for Dr.-Ing. Christian Walloth

Dr.-Ing. Christian Walloth

CEO and Founder, Walloth Urban Advisors SPRL
Christian Walloth is the founder of Walloth Urban Advisors SPRL, a strategy consultancy firm specializing in urban and regional development. Headquartered in Brussels and serving an international market, Walloth Urban Advisors supports cities, municipalities, and regions to pro-actively... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 11:15 - 12:15
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

12:15

13:00

Lunch
Thursday July 13, 2017 13:00 - 14:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3124 The Anthropocentric Era
A new era is beginning. It is the era of Consciousness. In India, Daddy Yankee of Brahma Kumaris, calls it ¨The Golden Era¨, because human beings are rediscovering ¨energy¨ within themselves and how to play god’s roll of creator with it. We know WE ARE ALL ONE, we are UNIQUE but we are not separated. We live in an holographic reality. Neither separation nor matter exist in the universe. We are waves, vibrations. Information as in-form-ation. We are energy, as waves. We are ¨in-form-ed¨ energy, Ervin Laszlo referring to David Bohm´s affirmations. The Universe is Holographic. We can see all the parts within the Whole. The locality doesn´t exist. what exists is the whole. We are all parts of the Holographic Universe ( Laszo, E.; Bacchia, A. 2017. Our Holographic Reality). Now human beings can access the forbidden education of the Alchemy of Gnosis, the Spiritual Wisdom. This discipline, during ancient times, was only revealed to the kings. Tantra also has a lot to do with this wisdom. Sexual energy is the energy that creates life, it is the most powerful energy in the universe, it is the energy of LOVE. Pure and unconditional love. The one that performs miracles. In this abstract, we are going to focus on the Whole system, and the subsystems of the universes. Not only the subsystem of this universe but also the whole planet subsystem, and the subsystems of human beings are linked. Special attention is going to be the powerful sustainable subsystem of Human Technology. The one is within, in our hardware: the body, and with the software: in the mind. It is the system which is free to perform whatever and whenever required. The decision of how and when to use it is ours.

Chairs
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
MF

Mrs Fabiana Crespo

Journalist,  


Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:15
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3007 Designing a Policy Response to Populism and the 'Wicked' Issue of Exclusion, Unemployment, Poverty and Climate Change
The scoping paper addresses unemployment as a complex issue, because it has many, diverse, interrelated variables that are perceived differently by different stakeholders (Flood and Carson, 1993).
It suggests a multiple mixed methods approach Romm, 2017) to inform policy development based on a policy process that re-presents the voices of diverse stakeholders (Hesse Biber, 2010), in order to inform a response that takes diverse views into account and strives to find a way to find overlaps in interests or to recognize spaces for difference.

Chairs
avatar for Janet McIntyre-Mills

Janet McIntyre-Mills

SIG Chair: Balancing Individualism and Collectivism, flinders university
I am based at Flinders And I am also linkd with Uni of Indonesia and Uni of South Africa

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:30

14:00

3042 Organisational Structuring: A Systems Approach
How to structure organizations is an issue that has always been relevant. In today’s complex world, new ways of refining organizations are required so that they can respond quickly to the demands of the environment. The system approach allows one to visualize an organization from a holistic perspective under different scenarios.

There are certain terms and distinctions that must be taken into account in the following discourse on systemic context: structure, methodologies, approach, paradigm, metaphor, model, and vision. In order to improve an organization, it is necessary to identify systems methodologies that can structure each type of organization. It is also important to provide organizational skills that allows one to structure organizations appropriately. To determine the effectiveness of structuring, one must know how to measure the impact of organizational structuring.

The operation of an organization requires the participation of all organizational actors: observer, facilitator, and participants. The methodologies explored in this paper have not only been tested in Colombian organizations, consultancies, seminars, and courses, but they have also been applied to various sectors of the economy. These applications have made it possible to observe the benefits of Interactive structuring process (ISP).

The use of isolated methodologies is insufficient for achieving organizational structuring. Holistic structuring brings coherence and clarity with regards to strategy, processes, actors, and information. The complementarity of methodologies is an interactive process that allows one to achieve the best organization. By coordinating important factors such as strategies, objectives, processes, values, and organizational information, it is possible to build a more interactive structure.

The first order of business will entail the defining of key terms associated with structuring methodology. Secondly, we will examine what types of views and perspectives are being adopted by organizations. Thirdly, we will turn our attention to the systemic approach and the importance of evaluating methodology. Fourthly, we will determine the best model to be used in each approach to a given situation. Lastly, we will observe the chosen methodology in action.

Organizational learning is defined as the process by which knowledge emerges from the interaction between the organization, methodologies, and its users in a research-action relationship, with respect to the environment. The design, diagnosis, and organizational redesign arises from a process that is repeated and improved upon through comparisons. It is through this process by which Meta methodologies are generated and aligned.

Presenters/Facilitators

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:30

14:00

3025 Emerging Technologies & Community Resilience (ETCR)
Modernity has increased the complexity of everyday life, exposing ordinary citizens to oftentimes imperceptible social and environmental risk. Integrated technological systems that leverage emerging sensor, computational and communication technologies, though, may allow individuals, organizations and communities to better understand, prepare for, survive and mitigate after micro, mezzo and macro hazardous events. Emerging Technologies & Community Resilience (ETCR) proposes to provide the knowledge, technology and expertise needed to create just this type of integrated system.

ETCR builds upon Sociological Theories of Action, Systems Theory, Information Theory, Computer Mediated Communication, and Social Construction of Technology perspectives as well as a novel theoretical framework, Systems of Accountability, to frame an applied, techno-sociological study of risk & resilience on university campus and their surrounding communities. An Action Research design, meanwhile, extends novel, inclusive and reflexive methodologies for studying complex system risks/hazards, which engages the collaboration of experts, researchers, administrators and community members in three international setting (Utica, NY, Concepcion, Chile and L'Aquila, Italy).

While enhancing/developing new computational, communication and sensor technologies, ETCR identifies/creates and aggregates dynamic social and physical data from various social data and bio-eco sensor sources related to social, health and physical-environmental hazards. These sources energize an automatized algorithm of hazard probabilities, made visual to community members through Virtual (VR) and Augmented (AR) Reality to integrate the operations and maintenance of the three participating smart and connected, international communities.

The project proposes to accomplish these technological improvements and interventions, while considering broader social and cultural perspectives on how community members identify, evaluate, adapt to, and incorporate smart technologies to reduce risk and increase trust among community members. Enhanced data science technologies will provide interdisciplinary, applied collaborations with integrated methodologies to identify, analyze and mitigate dynamic, multi-level risk.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3056 Systems Models of Leadership
Leadership is usually by definition about leaders, meaning that it is inherently an issue of humans and their characteristics. That characterization, though, has allowed for many competing theories with minimal clarity over decades of research. The purpose of this presentation is to consider what leadership might mean in more formal terms. It will suggest several possible models of leadership, drawing on principles from James Greer Miller, Stafford Beer, Russ Ackoff, Andryas Angyal, et al. The models will build on data about great leaders, taken from a study of officers in the U.S. Army by Gary Metcalf and Teresa Daniel.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

14:00

Afternoon Registration Desk Open
Foyer, Campus Gusshaus

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 17:30
Foyer G

14:15

3085 What Is Consciousness?
The objectives of this workshop is to learn how to be conscious and how to develop consciousness in an easy way. I´m going to use plain words and simple exercises to let you experience ¨consciousness¨.

There are four stages of consciousness:

-With oneself

-With others

-With medio

-With cosmos

We are going to experience some exercises to develop our senses, in order to be more conscious with ourselves, others, medio and the Cosmos.

-How to be in touch with oneself.

-How to know ourself deeper. The feather touch exercise.

-How to develop consciousness with the internal senses. Ecercise of insight.

- Kinestesia

-The Pineal Gland and tips to make it work better.

-The way we think. How to improve our way of thinking.

-How to control our mind.

-The importance of the Chakras.

-Cellular memory and how to clean it.

-How to deal with emotions and feelings.

-Alchemy, Gnosis, Tantra.

Please, bring your smart cell phone we need it to use in an exercise.

Consciousness is like a muscle, the more we use it the better it works.

A new era is beginning. It is the era of Consciousness. In India, Daddy Yankee of Brahma Kumaris, calls it ¨The Golden Era¨, because human beings are rediscovering ¨energy¨ within themselves and how to play god’s roll of creator with it. Now everybody can access the forbidden education of the Alchemy of Gnosis, the Spiritual Wisdom. This discipline, during ancient times, was only revealed to the kings. Nowadays with internet and the human being technology everybody has access to that important wisdom.

-Comments and share experiences.

Chairs
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
MF

Mrs Fabiana Crespo

Journalist,  


Thursday July 13, 2017 14:15 - 15:15
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3008 What Is Problem Represented to Be: Water Scarcity, Water Mismanagement Or Misdirecting the Systems? The Wicked Problem of Water Management in Nauli City – Indonesia
The paper delves into the area of concern of water scarcity in an area in Indonesia that we will call Nauli. A critical analysis addresses the social, cultural, political, economic and environmental context of the problem which reveals that the root of the problem is a misdirected system of managing water in the interests of profit for some at the expense of the majority and the environment. The paper addresses the social and environmental justice priorities of managing water effectively. The government regards water as a commercial good and prefers to sell it to the people rather than provide it as a common good.

This paper addresses the conflicts between governments and the challenges that have arisen with the water companies that commodify water while neglecting to maintain water quality and to provide services that also support and preserve the environment. This paper will examine the wicked problem of how to address the challenges of decentralization by ensuring that the needs of people are met by those who are elected and that the constitutional requirements of providing water are indeed addressed.
The WPRB approach is used to produce a map of the different ways in which the problem is represented, and propose a shift in the paradigm to address the water management problem through Ulrich’s Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH).

Chairs
avatar for Janet McIntyre-Mills

Janet McIntyre-Mills

SIG Chair: Balancing Individualism and Collectivism, flinders university
I am based at Flinders And I am also linkd with Uni of Indonesia and Uni of South Africa

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 15:00

14:30

3035 The Entropocene
According to Eric Schneider and the late James Kay “nature abhors a gradient” as it seeks to degrade any and all differences that can make a difference. They also claim that life self-organized by creating a meta-order out of disordered orders, evolving as an increasingly efficient, effective, sustainable (order from order) means for degrading the huge sun to earth temperature gradient. They inject purpose into the scheme by claiming that life represents “order emerging from disorder in the service of more disorder.” Or, as Jeffrey Wicken succinctly put it in “Evolution and Thermodynamics: The New Paradigm,” “Organisms are remote-from-equilibrium systems that maintain their organizational structures by irreversibly degrading free energy through informed kinetic pathways acquired through evolution. Dissipation through structuring is the strategy of life.” In other words, life came about as an evolving means for giving the second law of thermodynamics what it wants. Entropy. In my 2015 ISSS paper, “Anthropocene as Life’s State of the Art in Disorder Production: A Sustainability Conundrum,” I proposed that our species collectively is disorder producer summa cum laude. We are the most efficient, most effective, degrader of gradients, producer of entropy yet evolved. Calling our epoch, “the Anthropocene” doesn’t capture our essence. Our epoch is the Entropocene. We have turned the bio-geosphere from an accumulator of solar exergy (“free energy”, the measure of energy’s utility) as in fossil fuels, into a trapper of entropy a.k.a., global warming. Unfortunately, not only is our achievement as agent-of-entropy-in-chief not something to celebrate, our perch is being increasingly usurped by a new disorder churner on the block. Hyper-exponentially evolving technology is taking over where we leave off as it represents a far more effective, far more efficient means of degrading gradients, disordering orders including the gradients, including the orders that R us; our brains, our bodies, our face to face, family, community, societal bonds. This disorder, manifested as our increasing helplessness sans the escalating power of our technological props, our techno-prosthetics, spills over into the bio-geosphere and its ongoing degradation. My purpose in this paper is to continue exposing what’s really pulling the strings backstage of such global threats as climate change and by so doing set the stage for redress to ourselves, to our progeny, to our common, non-virtual, downstream future.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3102 A Framework for Complex Problem Solving Based on Systems Thinking and Design Thinking
Systems thinking and design thinking are two powerful and complementary approaches for addressing complex multistakeholder problems. Combining these two approaches seems to be especially promising for finding new and creative solutions for ambiguous and dynamic issues. The challenge of integrating systems thinking and design thinking has been of increasing academic and practical interest in recent years, but there are many remaining questions regarding the conceptual synthesis and practical implementation. The proposed framework tries to fill this gap. Teams, projects, companies and communities are facing many situations where previous knowledge and strategies are no longer valid but a shared understanding and vision is highly needed for coordinated action. Traditional approaches, such as lengthy and unguided group discussions or top-down authoritarian control by a single leader, do not work well in complex multistakeholder situations where both emotional commitment and technical expertise are of high relevance. The proposed framework provides a conceptual and practical synthesis of systems thinking and design thinking for solving complex problems. The presentation also includes a guideline for workshops in companies and educational settings. The method incorporates visual elements of systems thinking (such as behavior-over-time-graphs and causal loop diagrams) and elements of design thinking (such as observation, empathy, point-of-view, brainstorming, presentations and peer-feedback). The format is optimized for rapid reflection and fast-prototyping in meetings and workshops, while more detailed research and elaborations may be included in later iterations. An example case illustrates the use of the method along with typical needs and questions of novice participants.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3172 The Future of the Peruvian Natural Gas Through the Study of the Power of Influence of Stakeholders: Alternate Scenarios using Social Network Analysis with a Soft Systems Approach
The work aims to study alternative scenarios that could occur in the future of the management of Peruvian natural gas, as a consequence of the synergy of actions of the diverse stakeholders that are involved in their management within the Peruvian reality.

Natural gas (NG) is becoming the central energy source on various economies around the world, replacing oil and coal and complementing the hydroelectric power supply, mainly because of its price in international markets and also because of its low level of pollution for human populations, the flora fauna and wildlife in general.

To address this issue, this paper, firstly, introduces the reader to the problematic situation of NG in the Peruvian case, mentioning the stakeholders involved on it and investigating their particular worldviews (weltanschauung) and objectives in relation to the problematic situation of NG, considering the level of power of influence from one stakeholders over others involved in the problematic situation, on issues concerned to strategic decisions related to NG. This implies, firstly, that these stakeholders are identified

Then, the paper shows possible alternate scenarios in relation to the future of NG, doing an analysis of probable courses of action of these scenarios considering the specific weight that each stakeholder has over others, in order to define these courses of action. For doing that, an analysis of the level of power from one stakeholder over other ones and the goals that of each them seeks around the NG are analyzed.

Following the scenarios methodology, four potential scenarios for the future development of NG are established, considering two axes: the level of exploration of NG Peruvian reserves on one side (axis 1) and the expansion of the use of the Peruvian NG at the internal and external markets level (axis 2). From these axes, four scenarios were defined that could be taken into account for the use of social network analysis (SNA) in order to define possible alternate scenarios on the future of Peruvian NG.

In order to do so, SNA is used to see the level of relationships with positive synergy (contribution, alliances) or not (opposition, lack of collaboration) among the stakeholders. SNA will also be used to consider how the level of power exercised by each stakeholder can influence over others, to conduct the whole sector to one of the delineated scenarios, to finally raise the probabilities of which scenario can occurs, based on the intentions and objectives of the stakeholders, expressed in their relevant systems and root definitions.

Finally the conclusions of the case are made, the learning points obtained from the development of the present work and comments on future developments concerning the issue and the approach applied are mentioned.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 15:00

14:30

WORKSHOP: Eco-Social Systems (Human ecology)
Smart Cities with ministry 

Chairs
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 16:00

15:00

3065 Enhancing the Role of Education in Saudi Secondary Schools: A Critical Systemic Approach to Address Policy and Governance Challenges
The area of concern for this paper is how to enhance the quality of education in secondary schools in Saudi Arabia. The Critical Systemic Approach addresses the challenges that students face in achieving their learning and life goals and then makes policy suggestions based on 12 is/ought questions (Ulrich, 1983). The analysis draws on the ‘capabilities approach’ (Nussbaum, 2011) to provide policy recommendations that can be used to enhance the role of education in human development. The findings suggest that schools emphasise academic achievement in terms of a standard curriculum, but not in terms of producing well-rounded graduates. The critical systemic analysis suggests that the normative approach for education needs to be based on the development of students’ capabilities (Nussbaum, 2011). The Critical Systems Heuristics (CHS) analysis stresses the importance of working with different stakeholders and across different disciplines in order to enhance the quality of education. The process needs to be based on an inclusive approach to shaping and implementing policies to make sure all stakeholders can contribute to the process.

Chairs
avatar for Janet McIntyre-Mills

Janet McIntyre-Mills

SIG Chair: Balancing Individualism and Collectivism, flinders university
I am based at Flinders And I am also linkd with Uni of Indonesia and Uni of South Africa

Presenters/Facilitators
DS

Dr. Saad Algraini

Saad Algraini holds a Ph.D. Degree from the School of Social and Policy Studies at Flinders University in Australia. His research project examines public policy for human development in education. Saad has an M.A. in public administration and a B. A. in management and organizational... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 15:00 - 15:30

15:00

3171 Thinking-Activity Scheme as a Communication Bridge Between Systems Thinking and Systems Practice
Exploring ways to co-organize systems thinking and systems practice we discuss the answer of Russian systems thinking which was developed by the Moscow Methodological Circle (MMC).

MMC was organized in USSR in the year of J. Stalin’s death (1953) and was led for more than forty years by G. P. Shchedrovitsky (1929–1994). Now it exists as the “Methodological Movement” and a few institutions associated with it.

MMC developed “methodological thinking”, which was characterised by the following general features and principles:

1) holism and reflexivity in relation to the other approaches and types of thinking (in science, designs, engineering, socio-cultural and law studies, etc.);

2) practical orientation (connections thinking-activity, which used systems approach as the means for organizing processes of resolving complex problems by multi-professional and transdisciplinary teams, etc.);

3) reflectivity as practical orientation of thinking to itself, its capability to re-construct and re-direct itself;

4) the “methodological turn” from thinking about systems as objects to the process of systems thinking.

The shift from objects to thinking which was mentioned above characterises MMC from the very beginning of its activity. It corresponds to the shift of interest from “systems sciences” to “systems rationality” – as discussed in holistic systems thinking approach. This methodological turn has allowed MMC to formulate original vision of problems of the systems approach: not to investigate “systemic objects”, but to conceptualise and resolve “systemic situations” as a form of work with complex problems.

Now MMC systems methodology has three basic components which are the foundations of System-Thinking-Activity Approach (STA-Approach):

1) systems thinking (as “methodological thinking” described above);

2) Thinking-Activity Scheme (“scheme” in MMC is a diagram linked to the certain model as its meaning) and moderation technologies;

3) Systemic 3D-Methodology.

In Thinking-Activity Scheme (published in 1983) thinking and activity are represented in the form of different “layers” (“Pure Thinking” and “Thinking-Action”), divided by a “Thinking-Communication” layer. Links between three layers of Thinking-Activity Scheme are mediated by Reflection and Understanding processes. “Thinking-Communication” layer in Thinking-Activity Scheme provides collectivity of Thinking-Activity and allows to govern it by the means of moderation technologies. We use them in order to apply STA-Approach to systemic situations from practice. Moderation technologies are considered as the mode of communicative management supporting adhocratic type of interaction and deliberative communication, i.e. the “horizontal” and not-alienating interaction in multi-professional teams providing collectively-distributed thinking and multi-positional organization of resolving systemic situations which bear in themselves complex problems.

Systemic 3D-Methodology is the principle to think in the space of two “orthogonal” planes:

1) Object-Ontological plane with schemes and objects of practical theory;

2) Organizational-Activity plane with schemes organizing multi-professional communications and methods, forms and instruments of transdisciplinary thinking.

Methodological schemes are specific MMC instruments – intellectual constructions, which can co-organize Object-Ontological and Organizational-Activity planes of 3D-Methodology as complete reflexive 3D-space and be used as instruments on both planes. Using Thinking-Activity Scheme in this function with the help of moderation technologies allows to bridge systems thinking and systems practice in moderated forms of events organization (seminars, “round tables”, transdisciplinary conferences like ISSS etc.) and in process forms of workflow organization: project groups, foresight, Organizational-Activity Games (OAG), strategic sessions, staff games, civil juries, wisdom councils, etc.

Now Thinking-Activity Scheme has implemented in consulting, education, city®ional development, public policy, public expertise procedures, organizing of public-political communications, conflict resolving and mediation procedures. In future it will be useful in international relations, cross-cultural interactions, global problems resolving, etc.

Presenters/Facilitators
DV

Dr. Viacheslav G. Maracha

Leading Research Fellow, The Russian Academy of National Economy and Civil Service


Thursday July 13, 2017 15:00 - 15:30

15:00

3048 Geospatial Assessment of forest Biomass Towards Potential Redd+ Initiative for Sustainable Ecosystem
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) aims in developing strategies to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD), and emphasized the role of conservation, sustainable forest management and enhancement of forest carbon stocks in developing countries (REDD+). Geospatial technology is a fundamental tool in monitoring forests for various REDD/REDD+ related biophysical parameters; like deforestation, reforestation, afforestation, forest degradation, biomass and biomass burning, carbon stock and footprint. Current study deals with the future scope of REDD and REDD+ regimes for measuring and monitoring the current state and dynamics of carbon stocks over time with combined (integrated geospatial and field-based) biomass inventory approach using multi-resolution satellite data. The combined approach was applied on a regional scale with hierarchy of forest strata representing almost the forest structure found all over India. The top-down and bottom-up approaches can henceforth be implemented from local to global scale. Biophysical modelling was implemented to model the relationship between NDVI and biomass. Power regression model was accepted as the best fit (R2=0.82) to model this relationship which was further implemented to calculate multi-temporal above ground biomass (AGB) and carbon sequestration for complete study area. The current observations reveals that geospatial initiative for biomass assessment can serve as useful benchmark for future studies related to global environmental change and access financial incentives that may lead to sound environmental practices towards sustainable smart cities.

Thursday July 13, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:00

3132 Can Counterfactuals Help to Enhance the Systemic Thinking of Managers?
The focus of this paper is on counterfactual narratives and whether they can be used as a learning tool in a business setting to enhance systemic thinking. Counterfactuals have recently received a lot of attention from academics of different disciplines – from politics and international relations to philosophy and management. However, little attention has been paid to evaluating the outcomes of the use of counterfactuals and whether they can be used to increase decision makers’ systemic reasoning skills and their ability to deal with the complexities of the business world. Hence this paper will discuss how counterfactuals can be used to expose deterministic worldviews and to encourage managers’ explorations of alternative scenarios of the past. The discussion of theory in this paper is complemented with the description of a PhD project, still being designed, that aims to evaluate the impact of counterfactuals on managerial awareness. The research is essentially systemic in nature, given its focus on holistic understanding and appreciation of complexity. The field work will be based around executive education-style sessions involving the analysis of a fictional case study with multiple points of intervention. In addition, the project will also aim to determine whether there is an intercultural aspect to counterfactuals and management learning, as it will involve fieldwork in Turkey, Ukraine, the Netherlands and the UK.

Thursday July 13, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:15

3084 A Systemic Abundant Economic Model
Most of us dream of living in a better world. We would like the economy of the planet to be more just, kind and equitable. We are always looking to be secure in all areas of our lives. As a matter of fact, we usually waste a fortune on insurance. Health insurance, life insurance, home insurance, financial insurance...... insurance for everything! That is the equitable transfer of a risk of loss from one entity to another in exchange for payment. It is a means of protection, used to hedge against the risk of a contingent uncertain loss. But, what if instead of thinking we can control everything, also with insurance, we learn how to deal with uncertainty. What if we learn a different systemic way of using the ¨human being energetic tecnology¨: that embraces our body, mind and spirit, to lead the universal energy in order to favor our purposes, projects and desires in life, whatever they are.

This abstract shows how a Systemic Abundant Economic Model (FIGURE I) helps to grow not only in an economic way but also in a spiritual one. This requires us to be open minded. Remember ¨we are what we think¨ (Buddha). Besides, if we always use the same variables, it is difficult to obtain different results (Albert Einstein). So, why not take the risk, learn how to deal with uncertainty and lead the Cosmic energy to help us in our endeavors and wishes.

Chairs
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
MF

Mrs Fabiana Crespo

Journalist,  


Thursday July 13, 2017 15:15 - 15:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

Break / Networking
Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30

16:00

3064 Innovation as a Strategic Tool: Analyzing the Innovation Types of Most Innovative Companies
As known, innovation is the most important tool for individuals, organizations and states at todays’ world. Innovation has a strategic role for companies especially, because they can increase their revenues, access to new markets, increase profit margins and have a competitive advantages in sector.

Innovation can be defined as the process of implementing new ideas to create value for an organization. It involves deliberate application of information, imagination and initiative in deriving greater or different values from resources, and includes all processes by which new ideas are generated and converted into useful products. So by that way companies can be sustain business growth. Also it is the key to maintain the competitiveness for long term.

This study aims to analyze the innovation kinds of most innovative companies that are in the list of 2016 Forbes. Firstly, a literature research is done and the strategic importance of innovation is highlighted. Then Boston Consulting Group’s The Most Innovative Companies 2016 List is analyzed for determining their innovation types. In the list there are 50 companies in different sectors and they were ranked by company’s revenue, R&D spending. Content analysis is used for determining the innovation types.

The study also comprises the innovation ranks between 2005 and 2016 for these companies. As a result of these analyses most of the companies are technology and telecom and most of them use product innovation.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3091 Performance Management in the Public Sector: The Urgent Need for a Paradigm Shift
nowadays the public sector faces many challenges related to human health, biodiversity, and the fundamentals of life – water, food, and energy. there are many complex interdependencies between social, ecological and technological systems. future scenarios are showing an increase in complexity and uncertainty. for many public service managers, it’s hard to keep up with all the changes and transformations in society. their work is often about making cities and villages, and their residents, resilient in the face of rapid change. public service managers are struggling with achieving community outcomes in a ‘value for money’ cost-effective way and with managing the unknowable.

the challenges show that there is a clear and increasing need for an effective performance management system in the public sector. for many public service managers, this is a big challenge. research often focuses on performance measurement, but does not offer practical solutions to performance management in public services. there’s still a need for empirical studies of public performance management practice. this paper combines systems science with the daily practice of public performance management, to be able to translate research results into practical solutions.

the public sector, and the performance management system within, are complex adaptive systems, which means that they need vital energy flows to stay healthy. in this paper, we look at the limitations of performance management tools and the lack of energy that they create.

first, the technologies are introduced. the public sector has adopted many performance management tools from the private sector. a popular tool is the balanced scorecard. this paper explores the growth of the tool into a “systems dynamics-based balanced scorecard”, supposedly based on systems thinking.

secondly, we explore the people’s side of the public performance system, because the key resource in many public services is human capital. in many organisations, the system of public performance has a negative effect on staff morale leading to poor staff engagement and lack of openness by managers. solutions to address this problem are not based on systems thinking, and are leading to short term results, if any. so, the public performance system is not creating the essential vital energy flows to stay healthy, needed for its survival as a complex adaptive system.

in this paper, i use a number of systems and futures concepts and principles including dsrp, cynefin’s five contexts or "domains" of decision-making, complex adaptive systems, batesonian ideas of “space in between”, nora bateson’s symmathesy, and causal layered analysis.

then, based on and explained by the research above, i’m introducing a coherent, holistic performance management system, using my two models: the compass model and the coherent organisational performance model. these models identify the position of the balanced scorecard, and visualise the dynamics of organisations and people.

this paper shows that public performance management needs to be addressed in a different way, and with high staff engagement, to face the current and future challenges. this paper identifies the urgent need for dialogue about the underpinning paradigms, identifies the key success factors, and offers a practical model and method to approach performance management in a new coherent and holistic way.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3156 The Construction of Sustainability: Study on Production of Knowledge in Social Ecological Systems
One of possible approaches to construct sustainable social ecological systems(SES) is that we can understand the complexity of sustainable development of SES and then control the dominated function of key slow variable. The Knowledge production model, as one of key slow variable, has dominated other variables of SES. Its sustainable evolution is the important part of construction of SES. The fundamental dilemma for Logic-Experiment Model of knowledge production is that this model has failed to deal with the complexity of SES and create sustainable knowledge. While the Construct-Action Model of knowledge production has promoted the emerge of intersection of SES evolution and holistic knowledge innovation in critical state. Moreover, this model can help SES to withstand interference and create sustainable knowledge. In Construct-Action Model, the construction of sustainability emerges from the process of iterative feedback between actor level and observer level, and this has provided a structural narrative framework for the possible development of SES.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30

16:00

3175 From Communities of Practice to Boundary Critique: An Extended Approach
In the critical systems thinking (CST) literature, particularly in the theory of boundary critique, the process of marginalisation has been studied mainly taking into account those elements (issues, values, and agents) that are not fully included or excluded of a social design (Midgley, 2000). Taking this theory into account, this paper presents an extension of the theory of boundary critique by using elements of the social learning theory proposed by Wenger’s (1998, 2000, 2010b): Communities of Practice (CoP). In doing so, the proposal includes the idea of considering the marginalisation process as one described by different forms of participation and non-participation that build the participants identity and their concerns. To achieve this, this paper is organised as follows. The first section presents the main aspects of the CST research approach and the systemic intervention bases to establish the context of the discussions about marginalisation process. The second section presents the main aspects of the CoP framework. The third section presents the proposal of an extended version of the marginalisation process, applying some CoP concepts. We conclude by presenting a practical example of implementation of this extended approach and discussing the implications of this approach for CST research.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3215 A System of Accounts for Global Entropy Production
The development of smart cities is considered an alternative to face urban problems; one of them is the growth of population with disabilities and senior citizens, which will lead to sustainability issues particularly those dealing with services and infrastructure. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the need for innovation in the tourism sector, considering the Triple Helix model to achieve competitiveness in urban tourism destinations.
This research presents a literature review of the smart cities characteristics, challenges, and opportunities that bring technological development in social inclusion. The Soft Systems Methodology is applied to show how the smart tourism destination can be modeled. This review shows that smart cities can make more competitive and inclusive the tourism destinations, considering the cultural, economic, politic and social context and how the Triple Helix model of innovation is capable of building strategies and public politics that bring social inclusion for people with disabilities and senior citizens, making the city a more competitive destination.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 17:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 124, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3241 Strengthening the Resilience of Aging Societies’
Europe is ageing, due to higher life expectancy and decreasing birth rate. It is estimated that in 2060, 30% of the population in the EU are older than 65 years. Human worry, suffering, and grief caused by old age are a concern for everybody. This needs increased attention because the physical and mental health of a growing number of persons is actually or seemingly affected. Strengthening the resilience of seniors is a necessary but complex interdisciplinary challenge.

Can we do a better job of anticipating, understanding systemically, and mitigating the consequences of ageing? We are challenged to find new ways of integrating scientific, technological, cultural, ethical, political, and economic influences in order to alleviate the physical and mental stress caused by ageing and its consequences.

In analogy to Industry 4.0 the power of Information and Communication technology (ICT) and Systems Thinking provide tools for analysis (e.g. Big Data), simulation, extrapolation, and strategic planning of the trajectory of ageing and assistive technologies.

Nowadays, the senior population, many of them still active and even working, is surrounded by technology, internet and social networking. It is, however, necessary to adapt and align existing technology with the physical and cognitive needs of the lifestyle of seniors, their specialized health care, their idiosyncrasies, and their interests to support their active ageing, their independence and quality of life.

For this workshop we invite researchers in this field to present, discuss and compare their objectives, approaches, and (as far as available) results with respect to both theory and practical experience.

Typical issues are:

reduce physical, cognitive and social frailty amongst seniors, typically overcoming deficiencies of sight, hearing and touching
enhance seniors’ participation in physical activities,
motivate seniors to remain healthy and active,
supporting elders in healthy eating habits.
develop elderly-oriented, body positioning and training computer games
overcoming psychological problems, loneliness and isolation
non-intrusive alarm systems for helpers


Participants are invited (but not required) to send a short (half page) position statement by July 1st 2017 to the chairpersons in order to improve comparison and discussion of various approaches in the workshop.

Note that this workshop is closely related to the session ‘Resilience 4.0: ICT Support for Human Resilience in Crises and Old Age ‘, where full papers are expected.

For further details and information feel free to contact the chairperson.

Looking forward to seeing you in Vienna!

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Prof. Gerhard Chroust

Prof. Gerhard Chroust

Prof. emeritus, Johannes Kepler University Linz
SIG Chair: Resilience 4.0: ICT Support for Human Resilience in Crises and Old Age (see below for more details)Gerhard Chroust was born in 1941 in Vienna, Austria. He started to study Communications-electronics in 1959 and received a M.A. from the Vienna University of Technology in... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Shankar Sankaran

Prof. Shankar Sankaran

Professor, University of Technology Sydney
Vice President Research and Publications, International Society for the Systems Sciences.SIG Chair: Action Research (see below for information)Shankar Sankaran specialises in project management, systems thinking and action research. He is a Core Member of a UTS Research Centre on... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 18:00

16:30

3181 The Boundary Triage, Its Objects and Heuristics: A Synopsis of the development of a Critical Systemic Leadership Development Toolbox for a Networked World
Since 2004 the arrival of online social media technologies (such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter) combined with personal digital technologies (such as smart phones, tablets and laptops) that connect to the internet have seen business deconstructed and communication mediums proliferate. The past 10 years has seen a considerable change from businesses constraining the use of social technologies to the current status of encouraging more engagement from the overall supply chain and developing new technologies to harness this collective capacity for organisational goals. Coupled with a generation that grew up with ‘always on’ global connection via digital combined and a generation with clear boundaries, the class of the ‘boundaryless’ meets the ‘bounded’ has come with both exciting new innovations and opportunities and, at the same time, increased risks, threats, security and uncertainty. Business leaders are calling this the VUCA era, a term coined by the US defence force meaning ‘Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous'.
‘Leadership’ within this VUCA environment has been identified as a key organisational success factor that needs to be addressed, specifically leadership development at all levels. Yet despite a plethora of leadership literature over the past 60 years, leadership development has changed little. Systems thinking has been hailed as the new way of thinking and working, with Systemic Leadership, as the next operandum for leaders. Yet what is 'systemic leadership'?

The theme for the 61st Meeting of the International Society for Systems Sciences (Vienna) is “From Science to Systemic Solutions: Systems Science for Everyone.” This paper aims to provide a leadership development toolbox for ‘everyone’ to explore systems sciences and potentially develop systemic solutions critically using the idea of ‘embodied cognition’, cybernetics and critical systems thinking. This paper is a synopsis of my PhD research which investigates ‘Systemic Leadership for the networked world’. My mission is to develop a critical systemic leadership toolbox that encourages the critique of multiple systems and systemic thinking, while being easy to remember, employ and transfer to others with just one word – ‘Boundary’.

‘Boundary’ is word that is familiar and, at the same time, it is a key – if not ‘the key’ – concept in Systems Science. I present the core elements of the Boundary Triage (an axio-onto-epistemological symbolic representation of Boundary), its Objects and heuristics, designed using a critical systems thinking approach, from the perspective of embodied cognition. This paper summarises the pragmatic and practical aspects of the Boundary Triage toolbox to develop critical systemic leadership skills in a collective, connected and networked world.

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3016 Transdisciplinary Research: Methodological Insights in the Emerging Study of Sustainability in Project Management
The ‘truths’ of project management are changing with increasing attention being paid by practitioners and researchers on climate change and other public priorities. Projects and their management are recognized as “a way to sustainability” and sustainability is recognized as a developing theme in project management research. With the examination of the relationship between sustainability and project management increasing, a more detailed review of the associated research designs can now occur. The purpose of this research is to identify methodological insights that indicate and guide the transdisciplinary research in this field.

As sustainability is a topic that crosses several disciplines, such as physical sciences, natural sciences, ecology and social sciences, its research requires transdisciplinarity. Project management similarly crosses multiple disciplines as seen in papers concerning ‘schools of thought’ contributing to project management and complex applied problems requiring innovative and novel approaches . Preliminary analysis of the methods of a ‘sustainability school’ indicate conceptual studies of an interpretive nature, giving meaning to how the concepts of sustainability could be interpreted in the context of projects, or of a normative nature, prescribing how sustainability should be integrated into projects.

Scholars in project management have also been urging project management researchers to use translational research by borrowing research methods from other disciplines. Research in sustainability requires systemic thinking and project management researchers would benefit from systems research approaches that also support transdisciplinary research. Scholars of systems thinking have also labelled issues arising from sustainability as ‘wicked problems’ and urged the use of systems methodologies in transdisciplinary research.

A systems approach to project management offers a framework that connects the change associated with an individual project (at a micro level) to an intermediate (or meso) level where the results of a particular project could address a larger societal issue (eg, climate change). Beyond this—at the ‘macro’ level—project managers can see how their projects contribute to not only the sustainability of the planet, but its thrivability. And its partly through the incremental work of project management researchers that a fourth stage of ‘protopia’ can be described…one where nuances of societal progress could be as valuable (or even more) than the great leaps associated with traditional measures of project management success.

In this paper we will identify strategies used by researchers who have investigated sustainability in project management, describe specific methods, and propose how future research could be designed that can further evolve the field towards transdisciplinarity.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3083 Embracing the Complexity: Multiple Interests and Debated Resolutions in the Pineapple Value Chain in Uganda
Strengthening horticultural value chains can be used for improving food and nutrition security while reducing rural poverty. However, the complexity of local situations challenges the effectiveness of development strategies and calls for actor-oriented approaches. The fresh pineapple value chain in Uganda is illustrative of such a complex situation. The market supply is not organized though dominating and organizing lead firms. By contrast, individually negotiated and context specific actor relationships and their purposeful activities form and sustain this human activity system. As value chain actors take multiple factors for their business activities into account, the aim of our system analysis is to elicit their perspectives on the influence of these factors. This provides a more contextualized understanding to inclusively increase local actors’ benefits.

We used a systems learning approach, in which stakeholders and scientists seek a better understanding of the local system. Cognitive mapping and additional methods were applied to reveal internally hold perceptions about the factors and their influences on the income generation from engaging in the pineapple value chain. Several meetings with participants from only one actor group informed subsequent multi-actor meetings: five with farmers (4-8 each), one with brokers (5) and five with traders (2-6 each). Group cognitive maps served as starting point for twelve meetings which included participants from several actor groups (4-13 each). To foster the feeling of connectedness between actors along the chain, these consecutive multi-actor meetings evolved around the factors and situations that participants had identified as influential to all actor groups, such as prices, markets, quality and communication. The facilitation of the entire process was constantly adapted to encourage participation. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation further complemented the analysis.

The approach resulted in a contextualized picture of how multiple natural, technical and social factors influenced actors’ income generation in the pineapple value chain, e.g. farm and market price, market size, quality, seasonality, production methods and skills, buyer-seller relationships and transportation. There was little disagreement about the rationale of the influence of factors during the single actor group meetings. However, the number of factors and their cause-effect relations differed between actor groups. The dialogue during multi-actor meetings revealed problem-situations in the value chain. Participants expressed solutions and also explained barriers to them. For all actors in the chain to profit from their respective business activities, awareness of prices and other market information is particularly important. However, problematic communication patterns between actors showed current challenges and dissatisfactions. The flow of information was disrupted by the intertwined patterns of changes in prices, supply and demand, along with structural constellations, such as many small-scale farmers, relatively few brokers linking production areas to distant market centers and many, dispersed traders in different markets. Moreover, prices were individually negotiated and generally competitively formed. The occurring fragmentation among actors is the result and also part of the causes for communication problems, observed fluctuations and actor relations. In addition, the debate regarding proposed solutions, such as collective bargaining or establishing uniform prices, showed that this fragmenting feedback cycle is difficult for actors to break when contextual constraints and their conflicting interests are taken into consideration.

The participatory activities and shared explanations allowed the surfacing of problematic patterns and value chain structures that caused friction and hindered broader collaboration. The approach helped to trigger dialogue and understanding between otherwise often competing market actors. While actors are aware of the benefits from improved collaboration, this is difficult to implement given a contextualized system understanding. Participatory system inquiries are challenging, yet important for enabling actor-driven system change.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3157 Constructivist View of System in System Dynamics
System dynamics is an important systems methodology for analysing the complexity of the world, and the system dynamics school is one of the most influential schools of complexity research. Systems thinking based on holism has become an important mode of thinking for human beings to explore the complex world. It has provided an important methodological foundation for system dynamics. Systems thinking aims at analysing the complex system structure and adopting intervention measures from the whole, interrelated and macroscopic perspectives. Since its establishment, system dynamics has been perfected in theory, method and tool, and has achieved great success in solving complex problems in the fields of society, management, economy, ecology and so on. As an important systems theory and systems management methodology, the generation and development process of system dynamics contains rich systems holistic thought which is based on constructivist view of system.

Firstly, the generation of system dynamics inherits the definition of system in general system theory. For example, Bertalanffy tried to form a common general law of different systems from the biological and human problems. The Cybernetics proposed by Wiener, especially the feedback concept plays a very important role in system dynamics. The combination of information and feedback becomes the key of system dynamics to deal with complex problems. Secondly, one of the most important contributions of system dynamics is that it has changed people's views on system definition and system concept. Different from the traditional concept of entity system, system dynamics holds that the system is constructivist. It means that a system is a collection of variables but not entities. This systematic view of constructivism is a view of the integration of the subject and the object. Thirdly, the systematic view of constructivism has an important connection with Holon, and it has a great methodological significance in the management of complex systems. For example, Checkland’s soft system methodology tried to overcome the shortcomings of hard system methods such as operations research, system analysis, system engineering, etc. In particular, he advocated the use of holon in management. The soft system methodology can supplement the methodology of system dynamics.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 17:00

16:30

WORKSHOP: Socio-Ecologies and Human Ecology
Chairs
avatar for Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

Mag. Stefan Blachfellner

SIG Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems and Design, Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
https://about.me/bstefan
FT

Felix Tretter

BCSSS – Bertalanffy Center for the Study of Systems Science
SIG Co-Chair: Socio-Ecological Systems (see below for details)This SIG Socio-Ecological Systems intends to help advance a sound epistemology and methodology for socio-ecological systems design in conjunction with socio-technological systems design. At the interface of science... Read More →

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 18:00

17:00

Cancelled: 3036 Complementarity Model of the Organizative System Among Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Tourist Enterprises of Mexico, in a Changing Environment
The interventions of a tourist MSMEs in a conventional Mexican destination turn out to be inefficient in facing the perturbations of a changing environment. The forces of global markets do not provide equal conditions, increasing barriers that risk their life cycle. This context, provides the opportunity to address a local problem with high implications at national level through the Systemic Method and propose effective and adaptive actions. This paper presents the design of a model based on the beneficial adaptation of MSMEs heterogeneous attributes. The Soft Systems Methodology, served as an integrative frame of factors and actors that influence the problem situation and its abstraction in a model, which was contrasted through AHP. The results allow to establish that, systemic complementarity is a framework for integrating local collaboration opportunities and increasing the variety of response to generate a favorable environment and extend the permanence of these organizations. Likewise, the relationships could absorb deficiencies from the collective learning and the development of individual capacities.

Presenters/Facilitators
JE

Juan Enrique Nuñez-Rios

PhD. Student, IPN
ISSS Student
DJ

Dr Jorge Rojas-Ramirez

Dr., National Polytechnique Institute (IPN) - Mexico
PR

Prof Ricardo Tejeida-Padilla

ricardotp75@hotmail.com, Instituto Politecnico Nacional


Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3019 A Systemic Integration Approach to Designing Interagency Responses to Wicked Problems
Wicked problems are open-ended, highly interdependent issues that cross agency, stakeholder, jurisdictional, political and geopolitical boundaries. This confounds governments because policies and budgets tend to be aligned within these boundaries and not across them, making it difficult to bring the appropriate talent, knowledge and assets into an interagency approach to tackling whatever wicked problem is at hand. This paper describes the development and implementation of a Systemic Intervention approach to designing government interagency meta-organizations to address specific wicked problems.

Many governments realize the need for a ‘whole-of-government’ approach to tackling large complex issues, and have employed various methods to achieve interagency and other private/public partnerships. One approach is to employ experts (sometimes called Czars) who are in charge of specific policies and can coordinate input from across government and private entities. Other organizational approaches have focused on forming high-level committees and task forces made up of representation from stakeholder organizations. These approaches are intended to increase cross-government information sharing, identify best-practices, and generate reports that include recommendations to policy makers. However, the formation of these vehicles can be ad hoc and not designed holistically to handle the complexity of wicked problems where interdependencies abound and the perspectives and values of agencies and other stakeholders can often be in conflict. Other complaints about forming these ad hoc groups include the slow, long-term process required to build trust; one agency typically takes the lead, creating problematic power relationships when their own inevitably partial perspective starts to override the perspectives of other agencies; difficulties of reaching agreement on crosscutting agendas; too many meetings; inaction in the face of the above difficulties; and missed opportunities.

The research described in this paper was conducted to develop and evaluate a new Systemic Intervention approach to designing interagency organizations. It is a multi-method approach that combines the viable system model (VSM) as the organizational design instrument with participatory problem structuring methods and boundary critique. The idea is to create interagency meta-organizations that are specifically aligned to the particular wicked problem they are charged with addressing. The VSM offers a valuable method for creating such interagency meta-organizations because it allows agencies to remain autonomous, while also being part of a larger complex systemic organization. It also offers ways to build adaptive mechanisms for dealing with the rapidly changing dynamics of wicked problems, and establishes protocols for interagency coordination and information sharing. In contrast, problem structuring methods facilitate the engagement of multiple agency stakeholders to structure and formulate an expanded and shared understanding of the wicked problem (which is then seen as the “environment” within the VSM), and boundary critique helps the participants to understand and address power relations when boundary decisions are being made.

This Systemic Intervention approach was evaluated through an action research project called Crime on the Urban Edge (CUE). CUE has been focused on designing an interagency as a complex adaptive system for countering illicit drug trafficking by transnational organized crime, U.S. urban gangs, and their potential for systemic interaction. This is a wicked problem that crosses local/national/international agency divides. Although the action research was conducted in the specific context of CUE, the idea was to generate transferable knowledge about how the same or similar methods could be used for designing interagency meta-organizations more generally to better address wicked problems (e.g. urban sustainability, climate change adaption, terrorism, the energy/food/water nexus, migration issues, etc.). Preliminary results and lessons learned from the analysis of this action research will be discussed.

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3106 A Systems Theory of Human and Land Transformations: Systemic Analysis of Land Use Changes and Dynamics in the NorthWest of Pichincha, Ecuador
Despite past high deforestation rates, the north-west of Pichincha, Ecuador, is a forested area characterised by its large quantity of cloud forest and the creation of private conservation networks. Nowadays, the fragmentation of remnant forest is important, but both a strong conservationist movement and foreign investment in conservation and ecotourism activities counteract it. In fact, much of the cloud forest around Mindo is protected in the Mindo-Nambillo Protected Forest thanks to civil society initiatives.

In the context of this systemic research, the combination of the “Analytical Framework for a Systemic Analysis of Drivers and Dynamics of Historical Land-Use Changes” with Grounded Theory approaches have allowed researchers to achieve both creative thinking and novel outcomes, without losing a certain degree of coherence.

a)Historical institutional changes; b) production and external conservation trends; c)the biophysical characteristics of the land; and d) individual cognitive factors have influenced the decision-making process of the landowners in this area. Individual decisions have shaped the landscape, which in return have re-influenced formal and informal institutions and believes, as well as societal processes. Ultimately, decisions and choices affect present and future land-use functions (goods and services provided by different land-uses). The system's dynamic observed in this middle-range theory of human and land transformations pretend to generate knowledge in the way the already aforementioned drivers trigger historical processes (including changes in practices, and changes in understanding and learning). Understanding of the real motives of land use decisions have wider implications for nature conservation, policy and human development.


Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3207 From Certainty to Wisdom: The Contribution of Dynamic and Integrative Epistemology to Systemic Leadership
There is a “thinking and doing dichotomy” that assumes that chronologically we should think before we act. This dichotomy reduces human cognitive processes to their intellectual dimension assuming a superiority of reason over emotions. This dichotomy is rooted well-entrenched epistemological assumptions such as the assumption that the aim of the process of human knowing is to achieve accurate representation of the world leading to “a form of deductive knowledge that contained a degree of certainty unaffected by convictions, expectations, or passions” (Prigogine & Stengers, 1984This degree of certainty matches the Cartesian requirement that knowledge must be indubitable, infallible and incorrigible.

Dynamic and integrative epistemology overcomes the thinking and doing dichotomy by acknowledging that knowing is most and first of all an activity of the knower. Secondly, knowing does not aim at making accurate representations of reality (clear and distinct ideas) but at accumulating insights through information processing. Information processing is defined as enriching immediate data of experience with value and meaning for the purpose of decision-making and problem-solving. Knowing as information processing occurs at four levels of consciousness, namely, the emotional (pathos), the intellectual (logos), evaluative (ethos) and the active (praxis). These four levels of consciousness imply four different possible outcomes of the process of human knowing. Experiencing generates data or representations, understanding generates meaning, evaluating creates value while acting leads to achievement of practical goals. Furthermore, knowing involves whole organisms and not isolated minds, hence rationality and intelligence can be extended to artifacts such as economic systems, social institutions and non-human experts such as electronic expert systems. In this context, leadership in an information-rich has to be based on wisdom rather than on certainty.

Defining human knowing as accumulating insights through information processing implies challenging in an unprecedented way assumptions that normative epistemology inherited from modern science and its attempts to model all of human knowing on the physical sciences. The three facts of information i.e. being, behaving and becoming, show striking similarities with Lonergan’s process of human knowing in way that defining knowing as information processing implies an assimilation of the two frameworks. All in all, knowing as information processing implies that, as Simon (1971) has pointed out: “in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.”

These skills are not isolated acts but attitudes that shape the process of knowing despite its dynamic and integrative nature. Lonergan (1990) has called these skills transcendental precepts. For him: “progress proceeds from originating value, from subjects being their true selves by observing the transcendental precepts, Be attentive, Be Intelligent, Be reasonable, Be responsible. Being attentive includes attention to human affairs. Being intelligent includes a grasping of hitherto unnoticed or unrealized possibilities. Being reasonable includes rejection of what probably would not work but also acknowledgement of what probably would. Being responsible includes basing one’s decisions and choices on an unbiased evaluation of short-term and long-term costs and benefits to oneself, to one’s groups, to other groups.”

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 17:30

17:00

3030 A Policy Compass for Ecological Economics in the Digital Age
A policy compass indicates the direction and degree of success of a policy in both very general qualitative terms and in robust statistical terms. I propose to modify the compass to reflect the underlying suppositions of ecological economics: that society is dependent on the environment, and that economic activity is dependent on society. We can think of this as three concentric circles, the economy being the smallest.

Any formal institution can develop a policy compass to examine the discrepancy between what the institution would like to do (its mandate) and the actual performance and situation it finds itself in, where the latter is determined through an aggregation of statistical data and facts. These are made robust and stable using meta-requirements of convergence. They can be aligned with some of the fundamental conceptual and normative thinking of ecological economics with this new adaptation of the compass.

In this paper, the general policy compass is explained, followed by an adaptation for ecological economics. The policy compass is original, and so is the adaptation. The compass is inspired by the work of Satish Kumar, Stanislav Schmelev, Anthony Friend, Georgescu-Roegen and Rob Hoffman. In the conclusion, I discuss the accompanying conception of sustainability.

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 18:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 124, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

Cancelled: 3041 Soft Systems Methodology and AHP to Develop a Conceptual Model for Human Capital Management in Mexican Lodging SMEs
The lodging SMEs operate in a dynamic environment where aspects such as turbulence and information asymmetry undermine them compared to large enterprises. On this matter, it is considered that Human Capital Management is relevant to overcome deficiencies, delays in operations and to ensure the permanence of the organization. However, these human activity systems (HAS) lack of a systemic model that contributes to the achievement of such an end. This paper presents a perspective on this matter, from the Systems Thinking. In the methodological approach the Soft Systems Methodology was used, obtaining as finding a conceptual model that considers the heterogeneity in lodging SMEs problems and the human capital management. The construct was verified through the Analytic Hierarchy Process, that allowed to find congruence between what had been proposed from the Systems Thinking and reality, enabling its conduction towards a viable equilibrium state in its current environment. Personnel with managerial functions can benefit from an approach that pursues systemic solutions and the transcendence of the whole system like the one mentioned.

Presenters/Facilitators
PI

Prof Isaias Badillo-Piña

Professor, Instituto Politecnico Nacional
JE

Juan Enrique Nuñez-Rios

PhD. Student, IPN
ISSS Student
PR

Prof Ricardo Tejeida-Padilla

ricardotp75@hotmail.com, Instituto Politecnico Nacional


Thursday July 13, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3130 Energy and Water in the Earth System: An Integrated Modelling Approach
The concept of global change refers to planetary-scale changes in the Earth system. The system consists of the land, oceans, atmosphere, life, and the planet's natural cycles that are linked and influence one another. As a result, it becomes necessary to consider impacts of global change from an integrated perspective. The ANEMI integrated assessment model is developed at Western University to study feedbacks in the Earth system as they relate to water resources management and the energy-economy using the system dynamics simulation approach. Nine different model sectors are used to represent the system structure, which is composed of stocks and flows used to represent feedbacks within and between sectors. The model sectors include population, climate, carbon cycle, energy-economy, water quality, water quantity, water demand, food production, and land-use. The model has been used to study the dynamics of adding water pollution affects into the determination of water stress, potential for wastewater reuse to limit water stress, and the effect of carbon taxation on economic growth, CO2 emissions, and climate change within the integrated system.

In this work, structural changes to the ANEMI model have been made to create a tighter link between water resources and the energy-economy sectors and to study the feedbacks between them. Capital stocks for water and energy supplies are modelled dynamically in order to examine the development of alternative water resources such as desalination, wastewater reuse and groundwater mining to offset future water stress, as well as the dynamics of coal, oil, and natural gas as sources of energy for electricity and heating purposes. A link between the water and energy capital stocks is made by examining future projected growth in energy recovery from biogas and biosolids by-products from the wastewater treatment process, which is influenced by a projected increase in the level of wastewater treatment and reuse. Preliminary results show that by investing in recovered energy from wastewater treatment by-products, fossil fuel consumption may be reduced, thereby slowing price increases in fossil fuels as the supplies are being depleted.

Current improvements to the ANEMI integrated assessment model are focused on the development of a methodology to study potential feedbacks between drinking water and wastewater treatment as they are related via source water quality and economics. For example, treated and untreated wastewater discharges have the potential to reduce water quality of lakes and rivers, which act as source waters for drinking water treatment plant intakes. If water quality becomes degraded due to increased levels of sediment and dissolved organic matter, the cost of treatment and plant maintenance increases. At this point there is an economic trade-off between investing in increased wastewater treatment and the increase in drinking water treatment costs. The results of the ANEMI model are currently globally aggregated. This allows for the Earth system to be modelled simply in a way that allows for the dynamics of global change to be analysed and feedbacks to be diagnosed. However, this level of aggregation also limits the practical value of model results. A multi-scale feedback disaggregation approach for the ANEMI model is briefly discussed.

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3139 System-Purpose Method: Theoretical and Practical Aspects
This article observes methodological aspects of conflict-contractual theory of social systems. System-purpose method is formulated and determined in frame of the theory and presented in this article

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:30 - 18:00

18:00

18:30

ISSS Annual General Meeting and Social Gathering
Chairs
avatar for Dr. Jennifer Wilby

Dr. Jennifer Wilby

Vice President Admin, ISSS
In 1978 Wilby started working in urban planning, followed by database programming and textbook publishing. From 1994-97 she worked as a Research Assistant in the Centre for Systems Studies at the University of Hull and then from 1997-99 at the University of Lincoln. From 1999 to 2004... Read More →

Thursday July 13, 2017 18:30 - 20:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria
 
Friday, July 14
 

07:15

08:00

08:45

Day 5 Introduction: From Science to Innovation to the Development of the Society
INNOVATION & DEVELOPMENT DAY

From Advances in Science to Challenges in the Context of a Modern Global World Citizen and Participatory Science may be the next trends in systemic approaches to advance the sciences, as well as the interdisciplinarity of science and art to open our mindsets and perspectives.

This enables vast innovation spaces through the exploration of the scientific and societal discourse in the art scene and its interaction with research, science and academia. Science itself needs to become more transparent and approaches of science integrity are showcased in the last day of the conference, with a critical outlook on the demand of technology assessment and risk management research.

As systems science is fundamentally human centred, too, especially in its ethical foundations, we will discuss the intended and unintended social and societal consequences of digitalization and digital growth on the final day of the conference. This includes robotics and artificial intelligence, internet of things, and the promises of technological advances for the development of our societies


Friday July 14, 2017 08:45 - 09:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:00

Keynote Practice: 'Ars Electronica: Re-inventing Art, Technology, and Society' - Gerfried Stocker
Speakers
avatar for Gerfried Stocker

Gerfried Stocker

Artistic Director, Ars Electronica Linz
Gerfried Stocker is a media artist and telecommunications engineer. In 1991, he founded x-space, a team formed to carry out interdisciplinary projects, which went on to produce numerous installations and performances featuring elements of interaction, robotics and telecommunications... Read More →


Friday July 14, 2017 09:00 - 09:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

09:30

10:00

Dr. Javier Calvo-Amodio - '3142 Creating Systems Sensibility in at-Risk Middle Schools: An Oregon State University Science & Math Investigative Learning Experiences Project'
Project Description

The goal of this project was to increase systems thinking sensibility through an educational module. The module is composed of four lessons, each considering different aspects on how humans influence, and are influenced by, systems every day. The modules were developed as part of the requirements to complete a two-term course at Oregon State University: Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Capstone Senior Design. The project was conducted in collaboration with the Oregon State University’s Science and Math Investigative Learning Experiences (SMILE) Program. SMILE is a pre-college program at Oregon State University that helps lower-income, ethnic-minority, and educationally-underrepresented middle and high school students in rural Oregon pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and math fields.

Rural Oregon teachers teach SMILE lessons to select middle and high school students in after-school clubs. Given the unique objectives and customers of SMILE, the module developed had to be: 1) comprehensive enough so students could achieve systemic sensibility, 2) simple enough for teachers to learn and prepare for each lesson in 30 minutes, or less, 3) simple enough for students ages 12 - 17 to understand, and 4) engaging enough that students would retain and utilize systems thinking skills as they progress through their education.

The final educational module contains the following four lessons:
1) Defining a System, 2) System Hierarchies, 3) Emergent Properties, and 4) Feedback Loops.

The effectiveness and efficacy of the module was partially validated following three validation methods: 1) SMILE program provided an approval of completion to validate module and lesson-based requirements, 2) Educator and student-based requirements were validated through a combination of lesson demonstrations, a systems thinking expert panel, and a teacher questionnaire, 3) fulfillment of the Capstone Senior Design Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering course.

The systems thinking educational module has been delivered to SMILE at the end of this project for distribution at Oregon’s middle and high-schools. The sponsor finalized and published the module for SMILE clubs to use. The SMILE program has been tasked with tracking module use and feedback over time to ensure continued project success. As future work, a revision of the current four lessons is required, in addition to the development of a fifth lesson focused on the systems thinking concept of perspectives, which could further achieve systems sensibility for SMILE teachers and students.

Friday July 14, 2017 10:00 - 10:15
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

10:15

10:30

Break / Networking
Friday July 14, 2017 10:30 - 11:00
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:00

International Federation of Systems Research: Prof. Ray Ison and Gary Metcalf
Speakers
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU)
ISSS Past President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing... Read More →
avatar for Gary Metcalf

Gary Metcalf

OS faculty, Saybrook University
President, International Federation for Systems ResearchGary S. Metcalf received a PhD in Human Science in 2000 at the Saybrook Graduate School. His doctoral research was conducted under the mentorship of Béla H. Bánáthy, focused on Social Systems Design and Organizational Development.Metcalf... Read More →


Friday July 14, 2017 11:00 - 11:30
Kuppelsaal der TU Wien (Karlsplatz) Resselgasse, 1040 Wien, Austria

11:30

Student Panel PhD Reporting
Chairs
avatar for Chris Blackmore

Chris Blackmore

Senior Lecturer in Environmental & Development Systems, The Open University, UK
Particularly interested in social learning systems and communities of practice. Currently teaching and doing research. At the OU I chair Masters level courses on systems thinking in practice and environmental decision making. Also working on CADWAGO project...climate adaptation and... Read More →
avatar for Assoc.Prof. Dr. Ika Darnhofer

Assoc.Prof. Dr. Ika Darnhofer

Institute of Agricultural and Forestry Economics, BOKU (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences)
PhD (Graduate) Course Leader: Systems Thinking in Research Practice, 7 – 14 July | | My research focus is on management and decision making on family farms.Although I appreciate the value of the various tools of neoclassical economics for informing farm management on the short-term and for commercial farms, I find they are limited in their ability to capture the... Read More →
avatar for Prof. Ray Ison

Prof. Ray Ison

Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU)
ISSS Past President (2014-2015), International Society for the Systems Sciences | | Professor of Systems, The Open University UK (OU).  He is internationally recognised for his Systems scholarship that draws on second-order cybernetics and the biology of cognition and for developing... Read More →