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Thursday, July 13
 

14:00

3124 The Anthropocentric Era
A new era is beginning. It is the era of Consciousness. In India, Daddy Yankee of Brahma Kumaris, calls it ¨The Golden Era¨, because human beings are rediscovering ¨energy¨ within themselves and how to play god’s roll of creator with it. We know WE ARE ALL ONE, we are UNIQUE but we are not separated. We live in an holographic reality. Neither separation nor matter exist in the universe. We are waves, vibrations. Information as in-form-ation. We are energy, as waves. We are ¨in-form-ed¨ energy, Ervin Laszlo referring to David Bohm´s affirmations. The Universe is Holographic. We can see all the parts within the Whole. The locality doesn´t exist. what exists is the whole. We are all parts of the Holographic Universe ( Laszo, E.; Bacchia, A. 2017. Our Holographic Reality). Now human beings can access the forbidden education of the Alchemy of Gnosis, the Spiritual Wisdom. This discipline, during ancient times, was only revealed to the kings. Tantra also has a lot to do with this wisdom. Sexual energy is the energy that creates life, it is the most powerful energy in the universe, it is the energy of LOVE. Pure and unconditional love. The one that performs miracles. In this abstract, we are going to focus on the Whole system, and the subsystems of the universes. Not only the subsystem of this universe but also the whole planet subsystem, and the subsystems of human beings are linked. Special attention is going to be the powerful sustainable subsystem of Human Technology. The one is within, in our hardware: the body, and with the software: in the mind. It is the system which is free to perform whatever and whenever required. The decision of how and when to use it is ours.

Chairs
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
MF

Mrs Fabiana Crespo

Journalist,  


Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:15
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3007 Designing a Policy Response to Populism and the 'Wicked' Issue of Exclusion, Unemployment, Poverty and Climate Change
The scoping paper addresses unemployment as a complex issue, because it has many, diverse, interrelated variables that are perceived differently by different stakeholders (Flood and Carson, 1993).
It suggests a multiple mixed methods approach Romm, 2017) to inform policy development based on a policy process that re-presents the voices of diverse stakeholders (Hesse Biber, 2010), in order to inform a response that takes diverse views into account and strives to find a way to find overlaps in interests or to recognize spaces for difference.

Chairs
avatar for Janet McIntyre-Mills

Janet McIntyre-Mills

SIG Chair: Balancing Individualism and Collectivism, flinders university
I am based at Flinders And I am also linkd with Uni of Indonesia and Uni of South Africa

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:30

14:00

3042 Organisational Structuring: A Systems Approach
How to structure organizations is an issue that has always been relevant. In today’s complex world, new ways of refining organizations are required so that they can respond quickly to the demands of the environment. The system approach allows one to visualize an organization from a holistic perspective under different scenarios.

There are certain terms and distinctions that must be taken into account in the following discourse on systemic context: structure, methodologies, approach, paradigm, metaphor, model, and vision. In order to improve an organization, it is necessary to identify systems methodologies that can structure each type of organization. It is also important to provide organizational skills that allows one to structure organizations appropriately. To determine the effectiveness of structuring, one must know how to measure the impact of organizational structuring.

The operation of an organization requires the participation of all organizational actors: observer, facilitator, and participants. The methodologies explored in this paper have not only been tested in Colombian organizations, consultancies, seminars, and courses, but they have also been applied to various sectors of the economy. These applications have made it possible to observe the benefits of Interactive structuring process (ISP).

The use of isolated methodologies is insufficient for achieving organizational structuring. Holistic structuring brings coherence and clarity with regards to strategy, processes, actors, and information. The complementarity of methodologies is an interactive process that allows one to achieve the best organization. By coordinating important factors such as strategies, objectives, processes, values, and organizational information, it is possible to build a more interactive structure.

The first order of business will entail the defining of key terms associated with structuring methodology. Secondly, we will examine what types of views and perspectives are being adopted by organizations. Thirdly, we will turn our attention to the systemic approach and the importance of evaluating methodology. Fourthly, we will determine the best model to be used in each approach to a given situation. Lastly, we will observe the chosen methodology in action.

Organizational learning is defined as the process by which knowledge emerges from the interaction between the organization, methodologies, and its users in a research-action relationship, with respect to the environment. The design, diagnosis, and organizational redesign arises from a process that is repeated and improved upon through comparisons. It is through this process by which Meta methodologies are generated and aligned.

Presenters/Facilitators

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:30

14:00

3025 Emerging Technologies & Community Resilience (ETCR)
Modernity has increased the complexity of everyday life, exposing ordinary citizens to oftentimes imperceptible social and environmental risk. Integrated technological systems that leverage emerging sensor, computational and communication technologies, though, may allow individuals, organizations and communities to better understand, prepare for, survive and mitigate after micro, mezzo and macro hazardous events. Emerging Technologies & Community Resilience (ETCR) proposes to provide the knowledge, technology and expertise needed to create just this type of integrated system.

ETCR builds upon Sociological Theories of Action, Systems Theory, Information Theory, Computer Mediated Communication, and Social Construction of Technology perspectives as well as a novel theoretical framework, Systems of Accountability, to frame an applied, techno-sociological study of risk & resilience on university campus and their surrounding communities. An Action Research design, meanwhile, extends novel, inclusive and reflexive methodologies for studying complex system risks/hazards, which engages the collaboration of experts, researchers, administrators and community members in three international setting (Utica, NY, Concepcion, Chile and L'Aquila, Italy).

While enhancing/developing new computational, communication and sensor technologies, ETCR identifies/creates and aggregates dynamic social and physical data from various social data and bio-eco sensor sources related to social, health and physical-environmental hazards. These sources energize an automatized algorithm of hazard probabilities, made visual to community members through Virtual (VR) and Augmented (AR) Reality to integrate the operations and maintenance of the three participating smart and connected, international communities.

The project proposes to accomplish these technological improvements and interventions, while considering broader social and cultural perspectives on how community members identify, evaluate, adapt to, and incorporate smart technologies to reduce risk and increase trust among community members. Enhanced data science technologies will provide interdisciplinary, applied collaborations with integrated methodologies to identify, analyze and mitigate dynamic, multi-level risk.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:00

3056 Systems Models of Leadership
Leadership is usually by definition about leaders, meaning that it is inherently an issue of humans and their characteristics. That characterization, though, has allowed for many competing theories with minimal clarity over decades of research. The purpose of this presentation is to consider what leadership might mean in more formal terms. It will suggest several possible models of leadership, drawing on principles from James Greer Miller, Stafford Beer, Russ Ackoff, Andryas Angyal, et al. The models will build on data about great leaders, taken from a study of officers in the U.S. Army by Gary Metcalf and Teresa Daniel.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:00 - 14:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:15

3085 What Is Consciousness?
The objectives of this workshop is to learn how to be conscious and how to develop consciousness in an easy way. I´m going to use plain words and simple exercises to let you experience ¨consciousness¨.

There are four stages of consciousness:

-With oneself

-With others

-With medio

-With cosmos

We are going to experience some exercises to develop our senses, in order to be more conscious with ourselves, others, medio and the Cosmos.

-How to be in touch with oneself.

-How to know ourself deeper. The feather touch exercise.

-How to develop consciousness with the internal senses. Ecercise of insight.

- Kinestesia

-The Pineal Gland and tips to make it work better.

-The way we think. How to improve our way of thinking.

-How to control our mind.

-The importance of the Chakras.

-Cellular memory and how to clean it.

-How to deal with emotions and feelings.

-Alchemy, Gnosis, Tantra.

Please, bring your smart cell phone we need it to use in an exercise.

Consciousness is like a muscle, the more we use it the better it works.

A new era is beginning. It is the era of Consciousness. In India, Daddy Yankee of Brahma Kumaris, calls it ¨The Golden Era¨, because human beings are rediscovering ¨energy¨ within themselves and how to play god’s roll of creator with it. Now everybody can access the forbidden education of the Alchemy of Gnosis, the Spiritual Wisdom. This discipline, during ancient times, was only revealed to the kings. Nowadays with internet and the human being technology everybody has access to that important wisdom.

-Comments and share experiences.

Chairs
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
MF

Mrs Fabiana Crespo

Journalist,  


Thursday July 13, 2017 14:15 - 15:15
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3008 What Is Problem Represented to Be: Water Scarcity, Water Mismanagement Or Misdirecting the Systems? The Wicked Problem of Water Management in Nauli City – Indonesia
The paper delves into the area of concern of water scarcity in an area in Indonesia that we will call Nauli. A critical analysis addresses the social, cultural, political, economic and environmental context of the problem which reveals that the root of the problem is a misdirected system of managing water in the interests of profit for some at the expense of the majority and the environment. The paper addresses the social and environmental justice priorities of managing water effectively. The government regards water as a commercial good and prefers to sell it to the people rather than provide it as a common good.

This paper addresses the conflicts between governments and the challenges that have arisen with the water companies that commodify water while neglecting to maintain water quality and to provide services that also support and preserve the environment. This paper will examine the wicked problem of how to address the challenges of decentralization by ensuring that the needs of people are met by those who are elected and that the constitutional requirements of providing water are indeed addressed.
The WPRB approach is used to produce a map of the different ways in which the problem is represented, and propose a shift in the paradigm to address the water management problem through Ulrich’s Critical Systems Heuristics (CSH).

Chairs
avatar for Janet McIntyre-Mills

Janet McIntyre-Mills

SIG Chair: Balancing Individualism and Collectivism, flinders university
I am based at Flinders And I am also linkd with Uni of Indonesia and Uni of South Africa

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 15:00

14:30

3035 The Entropocene
According to Eric Schneider and the late James Kay “nature abhors a gradient” as it seeks to degrade any and all differences that can make a difference. They also claim that life self-organized by creating a meta-order out of disordered orders, evolving as an increasingly efficient, effective, sustainable (order from order) means for degrading the huge sun to earth temperature gradient. They inject purpose into the scheme by claiming that life represents “order emerging from disorder in the service of more disorder.” Or, as Jeffrey Wicken succinctly put it in “Evolution and Thermodynamics: The New Paradigm,” “Organisms are remote-from-equilibrium systems that maintain their organizational structures by irreversibly degrading free energy through informed kinetic pathways acquired through evolution. Dissipation through structuring is the strategy of life.” In other words, life came about as an evolving means for giving the second law of thermodynamics what it wants. Entropy. In my 2015 ISSS paper, “Anthropocene as Life’s State of the Art in Disorder Production: A Sustainability Conundrum,” I proposed that our species collectively is disorder producer summa cum laude. We are the most efficient, most effective, degrader of gradients, producer of entropy yet evolved. Calling our epoch, “the Anthropocene” doesn’t capture our essence. Our epoch is the Entropocene. We have turned the bio-geosphere from an accumulator of solar exergy (“free energy”, the measure of energy’s utility) as in fossil fuels, into a trapper of entropy a.k.a., global warming. Unfortunately, not only is our achievement as agent-of-entropy-in-chief not something to celebrate, our perch is being increasingly usurped by a new disorder churner on the block. Hyper-exponentially evolving technology is taking over where we leave off as it represents a far more effective, far more efficient means of degrading gradients, disordering orders including the gradients, including the orders that R us; our brains, our bodies, our face to face, family, community, societal bonds. This disorder, manifested as our increasing helplessness sans the escalating power of our technological props, our techno-prosthetics, spills over into the bio-geosphere and its ongoing degradation. My purpose in this paper is to continue exposing what’s really pulling the strings backstage of such global threats as climate change and by so doing set the stage for redress to ourselves, to our progeny, to our common, non-virtual, downstream future.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3102 A Framework for Complex Problem Solving Based on Systems Thinking and Design Thinking
Systems thinking and design thinking are two powerful and complementary approaches for addressing complex multistakeholder problems. Combining these two approaches seems to be especially promising for finding new and creative solutions for ambiguous and dynamic issues. The challenge of integrating systems thinking and design thinking has been of increasing academic and practical interest in recent years, but there are many remaining questions regarding the conceptual synthesis and practical implementation. The proposed framework tries to fill this gap. Teams, projects, companies and communities are facing many situations where previous knowledge and strategies are no longer valid but a shared understanding and vision is highly needed for coordinated action. Traditional approaches, such as lengthy and unguided group discussions or top-down authoritarian control by a single leader, do not work well in complex multistakeholder situations where both emotional commitment and technical expertise are of high relevance. The proposed framework provides a conceptual and practical synthesis of systems thinking and design thinking for solving complex problems. The presentation also includes a guideline for workshops in companies and educational settings. The method incorporates visual elements of systems thinking (such as behavior-over-time-graphs and causal loop diagrams) and elements of design thinking (such as observation, empathy, point-of-view, brainstorming, presentations and peer-feedback). The format is optimized for rapid reflection and fast-prototyping in meetings and workshops, while more detailed research and elaborations may be included in later iterations. An example case illustrates the use of the method along with typical needs and questions of novice participants.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

14:30

3172 The Future of the Peruvian Natural Gas Through the Study of the Power of Influence of Stakeholders: Alternate Scenarios using Social Network Analysis with a Soft Systems Approach
The work aims to study alternative scenarios that could occur in the future of the management of Peruvian natural gas, as a consequence of the synergy of actions of the diverse stakeholders that are involved in their management within the Peruvian reality.

Natural gas (NG) is becoming the central energy source on various economies around the world, replacing oil and coal and complementing the hydroelectric power supply, mainly because of its price in international markets and also because of its low level of pollution for human populations, the flora fauna and wildlife in general.

To address this issue, this paper, firstly, introduces the reader to the problematic situation of NG in the Peruvian case, mentioning the stakeholders involved on it and investigating their particular worldviews (weltanschauung) and objectives in relation to the problematic situation of NG, considering the level of power of influence from one stakeholders over others involved in the problematic situation, on issues concerned to strategic decisions related to NG. This implies, firstly, that these stakeholders are identified

Then, the paper shows possible alternate scenarios in relation to the future of NG, doing an analysis of probable courses of action of these scenarios considering the specific weight that each stakeholder has over others, in order to define these courses of action. For doing that, an analysis of the level of power from one stakeholder over other ones and the goals that of each them seeks around the NG are analyzed.

Following the scenarios methodology, four potential scenarios for the future development of NG are established, considering two axes: the level of exploration of NG Peruvian reserves on one side (axis 1) and the expansion of the use of the Peruvian NG at the internal and external markets level (axis 2). From these axes, four scenarios were defined that could be taken into account for the use of social network analysis (SNA) in order to define possible alternate scenarios on the future of Peruvian NG.

In order to do so, SNA is used to see the level of relationships with positive synergy (contribution, alliances) or not (opposition, lack of collaboration) among the stakeholders. SNA will also be used to consider how the level of power exercised by each stakeholder can influence over others, to conduct the whole sector to one of the delineated scenarios, to finally raise the probabilities of which scenario can occurs, based on the intentions and objectives of the stakeholders, expressed in their relevant systems and root definitions.

Finally the conclusions of the case are made, the learning points obtained from the development of the present work and comments on future developments concerning the issue and the approach applied are mentioned.

Thursday July 13, 2017 14:30 - 15:00

15:00

3065 Enhancing the Role of Education in Saudi Secondary Schools: A Critical Systemic Approach to Address Policy and Governance Challenges
The area of concern for this paper is how to enhance the quality of education in secondary schools in Saudi Arabia. The Critical Systemic Approach addresses the challenges that students face in achieving their learning and life goals and then makes policy suggestions based on 12 is/ought questions (Ulrich, 1983). The analysis draws on the ‘capabilities approach’ (Nussbaum, 2011) to provide policy recommendations that can be used to enhance the role of education in human development. The findings suggest that schools emphasise academic achievement in terms of a standard curriculum, but not in terms of producing well-rounded graduates. The critical systemic analysis suggests that the normative approach for education needs to be based on the development of students’ capabilities (Nussbaum, 2011). The Critical Systems Heuristics (CHS) analysis stresses the importance of working with different stakeholders and across different disciplines in order to enhance the quality of education. The process needs to be based on an inclusive approach to shaping and implementing policies to make sure all stakeholders can contribute to the process.

Chairs
avatar for Janet McIntyre-Mills

Janet McIntyre-Mills

SIG Chair: Balancing Individualism and Collectivism, flinders university
I am based at Flinders And I am also linkd with Uni of Indonesia and Uni of South Africa

Presenters/Facilitators
DS

Dr. Saad Algraini

Saad Algraini holds a Ph.D. Degree from the School of Social and Policy Studies at Flinders University in Australia. His research project examines public policy for human development in education. Saad has an M.A. in public administration and a B. A. in management and organizational... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 15:00 - 15:30

15:00

3171 Thinking-Activity Scheme as a Communication Bridge Between Systems Thinking and Systems Practice
Exploring ways to co-organize systems thinking and systems practice we discuss the answer of Russian systems thinking which was developed by the Moscow Methodological Circle (MMC).

MMC was organized in USSR in the year of J. Stalin’s death (1953) and was led for more than forty years by G. P. Shchedrovitsky (1929–1994). Now it exists as the “Methodological Movement” and a few institutions associated with it.

MMC developed “methodological thinking”, which was characterised by the following general features and principles:

1) holism and reflexivity in relation to the other approaches and types of thinking (in science, designs, engineering, socio-cultural and law studies, etc.);

2) practical orientation (connections thinking-activity, which used systems approach as the means for organizing processes of resolving complex problems by multi-professional and transdisciplinary teams, etc.);

3) reflectivity as practical orientation of thinking to itself, its capability to re-construct and re-direct itself;

4) the “methodological turn” from thinking about systems as objects to the process of systems thinking.

The shift from objects to thinking which was mentioned above characterises MMC from the very beginning of its activity. It corresponds to the shift of interest from “systems sciences” to “systems rationality” – as discussed in holistic systems thinking approach. This methodological turn has allowed MMC to formulate original vision of problems of the systems approach: not to investigate “systemic objects”, but to conceptualise and resolve “systemic situations” as a form of work with complex problems.

Now MMC systems methodology has three basic components which are the foundations of System-Thinking-Activity Approach (STA-Approach):

1) systems thinking (as “methodological thinking” described above);

2) Thinking-Activity Scheme (“scheme” in MMC is a diagram linked to the certain model as its meaning) and moderation technologies;

3) Systemic 3D-Methodology.

In Thinking-Activity Scheme (published in 1983) thinking and activity are represented in the form of different “layers” (“Pure Thinking” and “Thinking-Action”), divided by a “Thinking-Communication” layer. Links between three layers of Thinking-Activity Scheme are mediated by Reflection and Understanding processes. “Thinking-Communication” layer in Thinking-Activity Scheme provides collectivity of Thinking-Activity and allows to govern it by the means of moderation technologies. We use them in order to apply STA-Approach to systemic situations from practice. Moderation technologies are considered as the mode of communicative management supporting adhocratic type of interaction and deliberative communication, i.e. the “horizontal” and not-alienating interaction in multi-professional teams providing collectively-distributed thinking and multi-positional organization of resolving systemic situations which bear in themselves complex problems.

Systemic 3D-Methodology is the principle to think in the space of two “orthogonal” planes:

1) Object-Ontological plane with schemes and objects of practical theory;

2) Organizational-Activity plane with schemes organizing multi-professional communications and methods, forms and instruments of transdisciplinary thinking.

Methodological schemes are specific MMC instruments – intellectual constructions, which can co-organize Object-Ontological and Organizational-Activity planes of 3D-Methodology as complete reflexive 3D-space and be used as instruments on both planes. Using Thinking-Activity Scheme in this function with the help of moderation technologies allows to bridge systems thinking and systems practice in moderated forms of events organization (seminars, “round tables”, transdisciplinary conferences like ISSS etc.) and in process forms of workflow organization: project groups, foresight, Organizational-Activity Games (OAG), strategic sessions, staff games, civil juries, wisdom councils, etc.

Now Thinking-Activity Scheme has implemented in consulting, education, city®ional development, public policy, public expertise procedures, organizing of public-political communications, conflict resolving and mediation procedures. In future it will be useful in international relations, cross-cultural interactions, global problems resolving, etc.

Presenters/Facilitators
DV

Dr. Viacheslav G. Maracha

Leading Research Fellow, The Russian Academy of National Economy and Civil Service


Thursday July 13, 2017 15:00 - 15:30

15:00

3048 Geospatial Assessment of forest Biomass Towards Potential Redd+ Initiative for Sustainable Ecosystem
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) aims in developing strategies to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD), and emphasized the role of conservation, sustainable forest management and enhancement of forest carbon stocks in developing countries (REDD+). Geospatial technology is a fundamental tool in monitoring forests for various REDD/REDD+ related biophysical parameters; like deforestation, reforestation, afforestation, forest degradation, biomass and biomass burning, carbon stock and footprint. Current study deals with the future scope of REDD and REDD+ regimes for measuring and monitoring the current state and dynamics of carbon stocks over time with combined (integrated geospatial and field-based) biomass inventory approach using multi-resolution satellite data. The combined approach was applied on a regional scale with hierarchy of forest strata representing almost the forest structure found all over India. The top-down and bottom-up approaches can henceforth be implemented from local to global scale. Biophysical modelling was implemented to model the relationship between NDVI and biomass. Power regression model was accepted as the best fit (R2=0.82) to model this relationship which was further implemented to calculate multi-temporal above ground biomass (AGB) and carbon sequestration for complete study area. The current observations reveals that geospatial initiative for biomass assessment can serve as useful benchmark for future studies related to global environmental change and access financial incentives that may lead to sound environmental practices towards sustainable smart cities.

Thursday July 13, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:00

3132 Can Counterfactuals Help to Enhance the Systemic Thinking of Managers?
The focus of this paper is on counterfactual narratives and whether they can be used as a learning tool in a business setting to enhance systemic thinking. Counterfactuals have recently received a lot of attention from academics of different disciplines – from politics and international relations to philosophy and management. However, little attention has been paid to evaluating the outcomes of the use of counterfactuals and whether they can be used to increase decision makers’ systemic reasoning skills and their ability to deal with the complexities of the business world. Hence this paper will discuss how counterfactuals can be used to expose deterministic worldviews and to encourage managers’ explorations of alternative scenarios of the past. The discussion of theory in this paper is complemented with the description of a PhD project, still being designed, that aims to evaluate the impact of counterfactuals on managerial awareness. The research is essentially systemic in nature, given its focus on holistic understanding and appreciation of complexity. The field work will be based around executive education-style sessions involving the analysis of a fictional case study with multiple points of intervention. In addition, the project will also aim to determine whether there is an intercultural aspect to counterfactuals and management learning, as it will involve fieldwork in Turkey, Ukraine, the Netherlands and the UK.

Thursday July 13, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

15:15

3084 A Systemic Abundant Economic Model
Most of us dream of living in a better world. We would like the economy of the planet to be more just, kind and equitable. We are always looking to be secure in all areas of our lives. As a matter of fact, we usually waste a fortune on insurance. Health insurance, life insurance, home insurance, financial insurance...... insurance for everything! That is the equitable transfer of a risk of loss from one entity to another in exchange for payment. It is a means of protection, used to hedge against the risk of a contingent uncertain loss. But, what if instead of thinking we can control everything, also with insurance, we learn how to deal with uncertainty. What if we learn a different systemic way of using the ¨human being energetic tecnology¨: that embraces our body, mind and spirit, to lead the universal energy in order to favor our purposes, projects and desires in life, whatever they are.

This abstract shows how a Systemic Abundant Economic Model (FIGURE I) helps to grow not only in an economic way but also in a spiritual one. This requires us to be open minded. Remember ¨we are what we think¨ (Buddha). Besides, if we always use the same variables, it is difficult to obtain different results (Albert Einstein). So, why not take the risk, learn how to deal with uncertainty and lead the Cosmic energy to help us in our endeavors and wishes.

Chairs
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →

Presenters/Facilitators
MF

Mrs Fabiana Crespo

Journalist,  


Thursday July 13, 2017 15:15 - 15:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3064 Innovation as a Strategic Tool: Analyzing the Innovation Types of Most Innovative Companies
As known, innovation is the most important tool for individuals, organizations and states at todays’ world. Innovation has a strategic role for companies especially, because they can increase their revenues, access to new markets, increase profit margins and have a competitive advantages in sector.

Innovation can be defined as the process of implementing new ideas to create value for an organization. It involves deliberate application of information, imagination and initiative in deriving greater or different values from resources, and includes all processes by which new ideas are generated and converted into useful products. So by that way companies can be sustain business growth. Also it is the key to maintain the competitiveness for long term.

This study aims to analyze the innovation kinds of most innovative companies that are in the list of 2016 Forbes. Firstly, a literature research is done and the strategic importance of innovation is highlighted. Then Boston Consulting Group’s The Most Innovative Companies 2016 List is analyzed for determining their innovation types. In the list there are 50 companies in different sectors and they were ranked by company’s revenue, R&D spending. Content analysis is used for determining the innovation types.

The study also comprises the innovation ranks between 2005 and 2016 for these companies. As a result of these analyses most of the companies are technology and telecom and most of them use product innovation.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3091 Performance Management in the Public Sector: The Urgent Need for a Paradigm Shift
nowadays the public sector faces many challenges related to human health, biodiversity, and the fundamentals of life – water, food, and energy. there are many complex interdependencies between social, ecological and technological systems. future scenarios are showing an increase in complexity and uncertainty. for many public service managers, it’s hard to keep up with all the changes and transformations in society. their work is often about making cities and villages, and their residents, resilient in the face of rapid change. public service managers are struggling with achieving community outcomes in a ‘value for money’ cost-effective way and with managing the unknowable.

the challenges show that there is a clear and increasing need for an effective performance management system in the public sector. for many public service managers, this is a big challenge. research often focuses on performance measurement, but does not offer practical solutions to performance management in public services. there’s still a need for empirical studies of public performance management practice. this paper combines systems science with the daily practice of public performance management, to be able to translate research results into practical solutions.

the public sector, and the performance management system within, are complex adaptive systems, which means that they need vital energy flows to stay healthy. in this paper, we look at the limitations of performance management tools and the lack of energy that they create.

first, the technologies are introduced. the public sector has adopted many performance management tools from the private sector. a popular tool is the balanced scorecard. this paper explores the growth of the tool into a “systems dynamics-based balanced scorecard”, supposedly based on systems thinking.

secondly, we explore the people’s side of the public performance system, because the key resource in many public services is human capital. in many organisations, the system of public performance has a negative effect on staff morale leading to poor staff engagement and lack of openness by managers. solutions to address this problem are not based on systems thinking, and are leading to short term results, if any. so, the public performance system is not creating the essential vital energy flows to stay healthy, needed for its survival as a complex adaptive system.

in this paper, i use a number of systems and futures concepts and principles including dsrp, cynefin’s five contexts or "domains" of decision-making, complex adaptive systems, batesonian ideas of “space in between”, nora bateson’s symmathesy, and causal layered analysis.

then, based on and explained by the research above, i’m introducing a coherent, holistic performance management system, using my two models: the compass model and the coherent organisational performance model. these models identify the position of the balanced scorecard, and visualise the dynamics of organisations and people.

this paper shows that public performance management needs to be addressed in a different way, and with high staff engagement, to face the current and future challenges. this paper identifies the urgent need for dialogue about the underpinning paradigms, identifies the key success factors, and offers a practical model and method to approach performance management in a new coherent and holistic way.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:00

3156 The Construction of Sustainability: Study on Production of Knowledge in Social Ecological Systems
One of possible approaches to construct sustainable social ecological systems(SES) is that we can understand the complexity of sustainable development of SES and then control the dominated function of key slow variable. The Knowledge production model, as one of key slow variable, has dominated other variables of SES. Its sustainable evolution is the important part of construction of SES. The fundamental dilemma for Logic-Experiment Model of knowledge production is that this model has failed to deal with the complexity of SES and create sustainable knowledge. While the Construct-Action Model of knowledge production has promoted the emerge of intersection of SES evolution and holistic knowledge innovation in critical state. Moreover, this model can help SES to withstand interference and create sustainable knowledge. In Construct-Action Model, the construction of sustainability emerges from the process of iterative feedback between actor level and observer level, and this has provided a structural narrative framework for the possible development of SES.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30

16:00

3175 From Communities of Practice to Boundary Critique: An Extended Approach
In the critical systems thinking (CST) literature, particularly in the theory of boundary critique, the process of marginalisation has been studied mainly taking into account those elements (issues, values, and agents) that are not fully included or excluded of a social design (Midgley, 2000). Taking this theory into account, this paper presents an extension of the theory of boundary critique by using elements of the social learning theory proposed by Wenger’s (1998, 2000, 2010b): Communities of Practice (CoP). In doing so, the proposal includes the idea of considering the marginalisation process as one described by different forms of participation and non-participation that build the participants identity and their concerns. To achieve this, this paper is organised as follows. The first section presents the main aspects of the CST research approach and the systemic intervention bases to establish the context of the discussions about marginalisation process. The second section presents the main aspects of the CoP framework. The third section presents the proposal of an extended version of the marginalisation process, applying some CoP concepts. We conclude by presenting a practical example of implementation of this extended approach and discussing the implications of this approach for CST research.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:00 - 16:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3181 The Boundary Triage, Its Objects and Heuristics: A Synopsis of the development of a Critical Systemic Leadership Development Toolbox for a Networked World
Since 2004 the arrival of online social media technologies (such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter) combined with personal digital technologies (such as smart phones, tablets and laptops) that connect to the internet have seen business deconstructed and communication mediums proliferate. The past 10 years has seen a considerable change from businesses constraining the use of social technologies to the current status of encouraging more engagement from the overall supply chain and developing new technologies to harness this collective capacity for organisational goals. Coupled with a generation that grew up with ‘always on’ global connection via digital combined and a generation with clear boundaries, the class of the ‘boundaryless’ meets the ‘bounded’ has come with both exciting new innovations and opportunities and, at the same time, increased risks, threats, security and uncertainty. Business leaders are calling this the VUCA era, a term coined by the US defence force meaning ‘Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous'.
‘Leadership’ within this VUCA environment has been identified as a key organisational success factor that needs to be addressed, specifically leadership development at all levels. Yet despite a plethora of leadership literature over the past 60 years, leadership development has changed little. Systems thinking has been hailed as the new way of thinking and working, with Systemic Leadership, as the next operandum for leaders. Yet what is 'systemic leadership'?

The theme for the 61st Meeting of the International Society for Systems Sciences (Vienna) is “From Science to Systemic Solutions: Systems Science for Everyone.” This paper aims to provide a leadership development toolbox for ‘everyone’ to explore systems sciences and potentially develop systemic solutions critically using the idea of ‘embodied cognition’, cybernetics and critical systems thinking. This paper is a synopsis of my PhD research which investigates ‘Systemic Leadership for the networked world’. My mission is to develop a critical systemic leadership toolbox that encourages the critique of multiple systems and systemic thinking, while being easy to remember, employ and transfer to others with just one word – ‘Boundary’.

‘Boundary’ is word that is familiar and, at the same time, it is a key – if not ‘the key’ – concept in Systems Science. I present the core elements of the Boundary Triage (an axio-onto-epistemological symbolic representation of Boundary), its Objects and heuristics, designed using a critical systems thinking approach, from the perspective of embodied cognition. This paper summarises the pragmatic and practical aspects of the Boundary Triage toolbox to develop critical systemic leadership skills in a collective, connected and networked world.

Presenters/Facilitators
avatar for Delia Pembrey MacNamara

Delia Pembrey MacNamara

SIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science, International Society for the System Sciences
Vice President Memberships and Public Relations (2013-2019), International Society for the Systems SciencesSIG Chair: Science, Spirituality and Systems Science (See below for information)Consistently ahead of her time, Delia's Enterprise 2.0 training programs for business began in... Read More →


Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3016 Transdisciplinary Research: Methodological Insights in the Emerging Study of Sustainability in Project Management
The ‘truths’ of project management are changing with increasing attention being paid by practitioners and researchers on climate change and other public priorities. Projects and their management are recognized as “a way to sustainability” and sustainability is recognized as a developing theme in project management research. With the examination of the relationship between sustainability and project management increasing, a more detailed review of the associated research designs can now occur. The purpose of this research is to identify methodological insights that indicate and guide the transdisciplinary research in this field.

As sustainability is a topic that crosses several disciplines, such as physical sciences, natural sciences, ecology and social sciences, its research requires transdisciplinarity. Project management similarly crosses multiple disciplines as seen in papers concerning ‘schools of thought’ contributing to project management and complex applied problems requiring innovative and novel approaches . Preliminary analysis of the methods of a ‘sustainability school’ indicate conceptual studies of an interpretive nature, giving meaning to how the concepts of sustainability could be interpreted in the context of projects, or of a normative nature, prescribing how sustainability should be integrated into projects.

Scholars in project management have also been urging project management researchers to use translational research by borrowing research methods from other disciplines. Research in sustainability requires systemic thinking and project management researchers would benefit from systems research approaches that also support transdisciplinary research. Scholars of systems thinking have also labelled issues arising from sustainability as ‘wicked problems’ and urged the use of systems methodologies in transdisciplinary research.

A systems approach to project management offers a framework that connects the change associated with an individual project (at a micro level) to an intermediate (or meso) level where the results of a particular project could address a larger societal issue (eg, climate change). Beyond this—at the ‘macro’ level—project managers can see how their projects contribute to not only the sustainability of the planet, but its thrivability. And its partly through the incremental work of project management researchers that a fourth stage of ‘protopia’ can be described…one where nuances of societal progress could be as valuable (or even more) than the great leaps associated with traditional measures of project management success.

In this paper we will identify strategies used by researchers who have investigated sustainability in project management, describe specific methods, and propose how future research could be designed that can further evolve the field towards transdisciplinarity.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3083 Embracing the Complexity: Multiple Interests and Debated Resolutions in the Pineapple Value Chain in Uganda
Strengthening horticultural value chains can be used for improving food and nutrition security while reducing rural poverty. However, the complexity of local situations challenges the effectiveness of development strategies and calls for actor-oriented approaches. The fresh pineapple value chain in Uganda is illustrative of such a complex situation. The market supply is not organized though dominating and organizing lead firms. By contrast, individually negotiated and context specific actor relationships and their purposeful activities form and sustain this human activity system. As value chain actors take multiple factors for their business activities into account, the aim of our system analysis is to elicit their perspectives on the influence of these factors. This provides a more contextualized understanding to inclusively increase local actors’ benefits.

We used a systems learning approach, in which stakeholders and scientists seek a better understanding of the local system. Cognitive mapping and additional methods were applied to reveal internally hold perceptions about the factors and their influences on the income generation from engaging in the pineapple value chain. Several meetings with participants from only one actor group informed subsequent multi-actor meetings: five with farmers (4-8 each), one with brokers (5) and five with traders (2-6 each). Group cognitive maps served as starting point for twelve meetings which included participants from several actor groups (4-13 each). To foster the feeling of connectedness between actors along the chain, these consecutive multi-actor meetings evolved around the factors and situations that participants had identified as influential to all actor groups, such as prices, markets, quality and communication. The facilitation of the entire process was constantly adapted to encourage participation. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation further complemented the analysis.

The approach resulted in a contextualized picture of how multiple natural, technical and social factors influenced actors’ income generation in the pineapple value chain, e.g. farm and market price, market size, quality, seasonality, production methods and skills, buyer-seller relationships and transportation. There was little disagreement about the rationale of the influence of factors during the single actor group meetings. However, the number of factors and their cause-effect relations differed between actor groups. The dialogue during multi-actor meetings revealed problem-situations in the value chain. Participants expressed solutions and also explained barriers to them. For all actors in the chain to profit from their respective business activities, awareness of prices and other market information is particularly important. However, problematic communication patterns between actors showed current challenges and dissatisfactions. The flow of information was disrupted by the intertwined patterns of changes in prices, supply and demand, along with structural constellations, such as many small-scale farmers, relatively few brokers linking production areas to distant market centers and many, dispersed traders in different markets. Moreover, prices were individually negotiated and generally competitively formed. The occurring fragmentation among actors is the result and also part of the causes for communication problems, observed fluctuations and actor relations. In addition, the debate regarding proposed solutions, such as collective bargaining or establishing uniform prices, showed that this fragmenting feedback cycle is difficult for actors to break when contextual constraints and their conflicting interests are taken into consideration.

The participatory activities and shared explanations allowed the surfacing of problematic patterns and value chain structures that caused friction and hindered broader collaboration. The approach helped to trigger dialogue and understanding between otherwise often competing market actors. While actors are aware of the benefits from improved collaboration, this is difficult to implement given a contextualized system understanding. Participatory system inquiries are challenging, yet important for enabling actor-driven system change.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

16:30

3157 Constructivist View of System in System Dynamics
System dynamics is an important systems methodology for analysing the complexity of the world, and the system dynamics school is one of the most influential schools of complexity research. Systems thinking based on holism has become an important mode of thinking for human beings to explore the complex world. It has provided an important methodological foundation for system dynamics. Systems thinking aims at analysing the complex system structure and adopting intervention measures from the whole, interrelated and macroscopic perspectives. Since its establishment, system dynamics has been perfected in theory, method and tool, and has achieved great success in solving complex problems in the fields of society, management, economy, ecology and so on. As an important systems theory and systems management methodology, the generation and development process of system dynamics contains rich systems holistic thought which is based on constructivist view of system.

Firstly, the generation of system dynamics inherits the definition of system in general system theory. For example, Bertalanffy tried to form a common general law of different systems from the biological and human problems. The Cybernetics proposed by Wiener, especially the feedback concept plays a very important role in system dynamics. The combination of information and feedback becomes the key of system dynamics to deal with complex problems. Secondly, one of the most important contributions of system dynamics is that it has changed people's views on system definition and system concept. Different from the traditional concept of entity system, system dynamics holds that the system is constructivist. It means that a system is a collection of variables but not entities. This systematic view of constructivism is a view of the integration of the subject and the object. Thirdly, the systematic view of constructivism has an important connection with Holon, and it has a great methodological significance in the management of complex systems. For example, Checkland’s soft system methodology tried to overcome the shortcomings of hard system methods such as operations research, system analysis, system engineering, etc. In particular, he advocated the use of holon in management. The soft system methodology can supplement the methodology of system dynamics.

Thursday July 13, 2017 16:30 - 17:00

17:00

Cancelled: 3036 Complementarity Model of the Organizative System Among Micro, Small and Medium-Sized Tourist Enterprises of Mexico, in a Changing Environment
The interventions of a tourist MSMEs in a conventional Mexican destination turn out to be inefficient in facing the perturbations of a changing environment. The forces of global markets do not provide equal conditions, increasing barriers that risk their life cycle. This context, provides the opportunity to address a local problem with high implications at national level through the Systemic Method and propose effective and adaptive actions. This paper presents the design of a model based on the beneficial adaptation of MSMEs heterogeneous attributes. The Soft Systems Methodology, served as an integrative frame of factors and actors that influence the problem situation and its abstraction in a model, which was contrasted through AHP. The results allow to establish that, systemic complementarity is a framework for integrating local collaboration opportunities and increasing the variety of response to generate a favorable environment and extend the permanence of these organizations. Likewise, the relationships could absorb deficiencies from the collective learning and the development of individual capacities.

Presenters/Facilitators
JE

Juan Enrique Nuñez-Rios

PhD. Student, IPN
ISSS Student
DJ

Dr Jorge Rojas-Ramirez

Dr., National Polytechnique Institute (IPN) - Mexico
RT

RICARDO TEJEIDA-PADILLA

ricardotp75@hotmail.com, Instituto Politecnico Nacional


Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3019 A Systemic Integration Approach to Designing Interagency Responses to Wicked Problems
Wicked problems are open-ended, highly interdependent issues that cross agency, stakeholder, jurisdictional, political and geopolitical boundaries. This confounds governments because policies and budgets tend to be aligned within these boundaries and not across them, making it difficult to bring the appropriate talent, knowledge and assets into an interagency approach to tackling whatever wicked problem is at hand. This paper describes the development and implementation of a Systemic Intervention approach to designing government interagency meta-organizations to address specific wicked problems.

Many governments realize the need for a ‘whole-of-government’ approach to tackling large complex issues, and have employed various methods to achieve interagency and other private/public partnerships. One approach is to employ experts (sometimes called Czars) who are in charge of specific policies and can coordinate input from across government and private entities. Other organizational approaches have focused on forming high-level committees and task forces made up of representation from stakeholder organizations. These approaches are intended to increase cross-government information sharing, identify best-practices, and generate reports that include recommendations to policy makers. However, the formation of these vehicles can be ad hoc and not designed holistically to handle the complexity of wicked problems where interdependencies abound and the perspectives and values of agencies and other stakeholders can often be in conflict. Other complaints about forming these ad hoc groups include the slow, long-term process required to build trust; one agency typically takes the lead, creating problematic power relationships when their own inevitably partial perspective starts to override the perspectives of other agencies; difficulties of reaching agreement on crosscutting agendas; too many meetings; inaction in the face of the above difficulties; and missed opportunities.

The research described in this paper was conducted to develop and evaluate a new Systemic Intervention approach to designing interagency organizations. It is a multi-method approach that combines the viable system model (VSM) as the organizational design instrument with participatory problem structuring methods and boundary critique. The idea is to create interagency meta-organizations that are specifically aligned to the particular wicked problem they are charged with addressing. The VSM offers a valuable method for creating such interagency meta-organizations because it allows agencies to remain autonomous, while also being part of a larger complex systemic organization. It also offers ways to build adaptive mechanisms for dealing with the rapidly changing dynamics of wicked problems, and establishes protocols for interagency coordination and information sharing. In contrast, problem structuring methods facilitate the engagement of multiple agency stakeholders to structure and formulate an expanded and shared understanding of the wicked problem (which is then seen as the “environment” within the VSM), and boundary critique helps the participants to understand and address power relations when boundary decisions are being made.

This Systemic Intervention approach was evaluated through an action research project called Crime on the Urban Edge (CUE). CUE has been focused on designing an interagency as a complex adaptive system for countering illicit drug trafficking by transnational organized crime, U.S. urban gangs, and their potential for systemic interaction. This is a wicked problem that crosses local/national/international agency divides. Although the action research was conducted in the specific context of CUE, the idea was to generate transferable knowledge about how the same or similar methods could be used for designing interagency meta-organizations more generally to better address wicked problems (e.g. urban sustainability, climate change adaption, terrorism, the energy/food/water nexus, migration issues, etc.). Preliminary results and lessons learned from the analysis of this action research will be discussed.

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
4th Floor, Room SR 384, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3106 A Systems Theory of Human and Land Transformations: Systemic Analysis of Land Use Changes and Dynamics in the NorthWest of Pichincha, Ecuador
Despite past high deforestation rates, the north-west of Pichincha, Ecuador, is a forested area characterised by its large quantity of cloud forest and the creation of private conservation networks. Nowadays, the fragmentation of remnant forest is important, but both a strong conservationist movement and foreign investment in conservation and ecotourism activities counteract it. In fact, much of the cloud forest around Mindo is protected in the Mindo-Nambillo Protected Forest thanks to civil society initiatives.

In the context of this systemic research, the combination of the “Analytical Framework for a Systemic Analysis of Drivers and Dynamics of Historical Land-Use Changes” with Grounded Theory approaches have allowed researchers to achieve both creative thinking and novel outcomes, without losing a certain degree of coherence.

a)Historical institutional changes; b) production and external conservation trends; c)the biophysical characteristics of the land; and d) individual cognitive factors have influenced the decision-making process of the landowners in this area. Individual decisions have shaped the landscape, which in return have re-influenced formal and informal institutions and believes, as well as societal processes. Ultimately, decisions and choices affect present and future land-use functions (goods and services provided by different land-uses). The system's dynamic observed in this middle-range theory of human and land transformations pretend to generate knowledge in the way the already aforementioned drivers trigger historical processes (including changes in practices, and changes in understanding and learning). Understanding of the real motives of land use decisions have wider implications for nature conservation, policy and human development.


Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:00

3207 From Certainty to Wisdom: The Contribution of Dynamic and Integrative Epistemology to Systemic Leadership
There is a “thinking and doing dichotomy” that assumes that chronologically we should think before we act. This dichotomy reduces human cognitive processes to their intellectual dimension assuming a superiority of reason over emotions. This dichotomy is rooted well-entrenched epistemological assumptions such as the assumption that the aim of the process of human knowing is to achieve accurate representation of the world leading to “a form of deductive knowledge that contained a degree of certainty unaffected by convictions, expectations, or passions” (Prigogine & Stengers, 1984This degree of certainty matches the Cartesian requirement that knowledge must be indubitable, infallible and incorrigible.

Dynamic and integrative epistemology overcomes the thinking and doing dichotomy by acknowledging that knowing is most and first of all an activity of the knower. Secondly, knowing does not aim at making accurate representations of reality (clear and distinct ideas) but at accumulating insights through information processing. Information processing is defined as enriching immediate data of experience with value and meaning for the purpose of decision-making and problem-solving. Knowing as information processing occurs at four levels of consciousness, namely, the emotional (pathos), the intellectual (logos), evaluative (ethos) and the active (praxis). These four levels of consciousness imply four different possible outcomes of the process of human knowing. Experiencing generates data or representations, understanding generates meaning, evaluating creates value while acting leads to achievement of practical goals. Furthermore, knowing involves whole organisms and not isolated minds, hence rationality and intelligence can be extended to artifacts such as economic systems, social institutions and non-human experts such as electronic expert systems. In this context, leadership in an information-rich has to be based on wisdom rather than on certainty.

Defining human knowing as accumulating insights through information processing implies challenging in an unprecedented way assumptions that normative epistemology inherited from modern science and its attempts to model all of human knowing on the physical sciences. The three facts of information i.e. being, behaving and becoming, show striking similarities with Lonergan’s process of human knowing in way that defining knowing as information processing implies an assimilation of the two frameworks. All in all, knowing as information processing implies that, as Simon (1971) has pointed out: “in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.”

These skills are not isolated acts but attitudes that shape the process of knowing despite its dynamic and integrative nature. Lonergan (1990) has called these skills transcendental precepts. For him: “progress proceeds from originating value, from subjects being their true selves by observing the transcendental precepts, Be attentive, Be Intelligent, Be reasonable, Be responsible. Being attentive includes attention to human affairs. Being intelligent includes a grasping of hitherto unnoticed or unrealized possibilities. Being reasonable includes rejection of what probably would not work but also acknowledgement of what probably would. Being responsible includes basing one’s decisions and choices on an unbiased evaluation of short-term and long-term costs and benefits to oneself, to one’s groups, to other groups.”

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:00 - 17:30

17:30

Cancelled: 3041 Soft Systems Methodology and AHP to Develop a Conceptual Model for Human Capital Management in Mexican Lodging SMEs
The lodging SMEs operate in a dynamic environment where aspects such as turbulence and information asymmetry undermine them compared to large enterprises. On this matter, it is considered that Human Capital Management is relevant to overcome deficiencies, delays in operations and to ensure the permanence of the organization. However, these human activity systems (HAS) lack of a systemic model that contributes to the achievement of such an end. This paper presents a perspective on this matter, from the Systems Thinking. In the methodological approach the Soft Systems Methodology was used, obtaining as finding a conceptual model that considers the heterogeneity in lodging SMEs problems and the human capital management. The construct was verified through the Analytic Hierarchy Process, that allowed to find congruence between what had been proposed from the Systems Thinking and reality, enabling its conduction towards a viable equilibrium state in its current environment. Personnel with managerial functions can benefit from an approach that pursues systemic solutions and the transcendence of the whole system like the one mentioned.

Presenters/Facilitators
PI

Prof Isaias Badillo-Piña

Professor, Instituto Politecnico Nacional
JE

Juan Enrique Nuñez-Rios

PhD. Student, IPN
ISSS Student
RT

RICARDO TEJEIDA-PADILLA

ricardotp75@hotmail.com, Instituto Politecnico Nacional


Thursday July 13, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
2nd Floor, Room SR 125, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3130 Energy and Water in the Earth System: An Integrated Modelling Approach
The concept of global change refers to planetary-scale changes in the Earth system. The system consists of the land, oceans, atmosphere, life, and the planet's natural cycles that are linked and influence one another. As a result, it becomes necessary to consider impacts of global change from an integrated perspective. The ANEMI integrated assessment model is developed at Western University to study feedbacks in the Earth system as they relate to water resources management and the energy-economy using the system dynamics simulation approach. Nine different model sectors are used to represent the system structure, which is composed of stocks and flows used to represent feedbacks within and between sectors. The model sectors include population, climate, carbon cycle, energy-economy, water quality, water quantity, water demand, food production, and land-use. The model has been used to study the dynamics of adding water pollution affects into the determination of water stress, potential for wastewater reuse to limit water stress, and the effect of carbon taxation on economic growth, CO2 emissions, and climate change within the integrated system.

In this work, structural changes to the ANEMI model have been made to create a tighter link between water resources and the energy-economy sectors and to study the feedbacks between them. Capital stocks for water and energy supplies are modelled dynamically in order to examine the development of alternative water resources such as desalination, wastewater reuse and groundwater mining to offset future water stress, as well as the dynamics of coal, oil, and natural gas as sources of energy for electricity and heating purposes. A link between the water and energy capital stocks is made by examining future projected growth in energy recovery from biogas and biosolids by-products from the wastewater treatment process, which is influenced by a projected increase in the level of wastewater treatment and reuse. Preliminary results show that by investing in recovered energy from wastewater treatment by-products, fossil fuel consumption may be reduced, thereby slowing price increases in fossil fuels as the supplies are being depleted.

Current improvements to the ANEMI integrated assessment model are focused on the development of a methodology to study potential feedbacks between drinking water and wastewater treatment as they are related via source water quality and economics. For example, treated and untreated wastewater discharges have the potential to reduce water quality of lakes and rivers, which act as source waters for drinking water treatment plant intakes. If water quality becomes degraded due to increased levels of sediment and dissolved organic matter, the cost of treatment and plant maintenance increases. At this point there is an economic trade-off between investing in increased wastewater treatment and the increase in drinking water treatment costs. The results of the ANEMI model are currently globally aggregated. This allows for the Earth system to be modelled simply in a way that allows for the dynamics of global change to be analysed and feedbacks to be diagnosed. However, this level of aggregation also limits the practical value of model results. A multi-scale feedback disaggregation approach for the ANEMI model is briefly discussed.

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:30 - 18:00
3rd Floor, Room SR 121, Institut für Computertechnik,TU Wien Gußhausstraße 27-29, 1040 Wien, Austria

17:30

3139 System-Purpose Method: Theoretical and Practical Aspects
This article observes methodological aspects of conflict-contractual theory of social systems. System-purpose method is formulated and determined in frame of the theory and presented in this article

Thursday July 13, 2017 17:30 - 18:00